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Prime
03-26-2006, 09:13 PM
I pormise you for a fact that I WILL start to lift weights tomorow. The question is how should my workout week look like? Do I need to take every other day off or is it ok to work out 20 minutes a day for 4 or 5 days straight?

Buddwalk
03-26-2006, 09:26 PM
simply dont....I dont approve or encourage you working out for the reasons you want to...I'd rather you spend your time on an instrument man. Remember the strongest muscle is your body is your heart :wink:

Rocky Raccoon
03-26-2006, 09:54 PM
the best thing to do is start lightly and work your way up. This way you don't overwork yourself. Create a different challenge every week, but don't try to do to much at once.

calphin
03-26-2006, 10:02 PM
The amount of weight to be used should be based on a percentage of the maximum amount of weight that can be lifted one time, generally referred to as one repetition maximum (1RM). The maximum number of repetitions performed before fatigue prohibits the completion of an additional repetition is a function of the weight used, referred to as repetition maximum (RM), and reflects the intensity of the exercise. A weight load that produces fatigue on the third repetition is termed a three repetition maximum (3RM) and corresponds to approximately 95% of the weight that could be lifted for 1RM.

For maximum results athletes should train according to their genetic predisposition. An athlete with a greater proportion of slow twitch muscles would adapt better to an endurance training and a muscular endurance program using more repetitions of a lighter weight. An athlete with a greater proportion of fast twitch muscles would benefit from sprint training and a muscular strength program using fewer repetitions of a heavier weight.

Load - Repetition Relationship
The strength training zone requires you to use loads in the range of 60% to 100% of 1RM. The relationship of percentage loads to number of repetitions (rounded up) to failure are as follows:

60% - 17 reps
65% - 14 reps
70% - 12 reps
75% - 10 reps
80% - 8 reps
85% - 6 reps
90% - 5 reps
95% - 3 reps
100% - 1 rep
How Many
The number of repetitions performed to fatigue is an important consideration in designing a strength training program. The greatest strength gains appear to result from working with 4-6RM. Increasing this to 12-20RM favours the increase in muscle endurance and mass.

One set of 4-6RM performed 3 days a week is a typical strength training program. The optimal number of sets of an exercise to develop muscle strength remains controversial. In a number of studies comparing multiple set programs to produce greater strength gains than a single set, the majority of studies indicate that there is not a significant difference.

Handling heavy weights in the pursuit of strength will require a recovery of 3-5 minutes between sets, but only minimum recovery should be taken if strength endurance is the aim. The majority of athletic events are fast and dynamic, and therefore this quality must be reflected in the athlete's strength work.

Muscular strength is primarily developed when 8RM or less is used in a set. How much load you use depends upon what it is you wish to develop:

1RM to 3RM - neuromuscular strength
4RM to 6RM - maximum strength by stimulating muscle hypertrophy
6RM to 12RM - muscle size (hypertrophy) with moderate gains in strength (Fleck & Kraemer, 1996)
12RM to 20RM - muscle size and endurance

Rest Interval between sets
The aim of the recovery period between sets is to replenish the stores of ATP and Creatine Phosphate (CP) in the muscles. An inadequate recovery means more reliance on the Lactic Acid (LA) energy pathway in the next set. Several factors influence the recovery period, including:

Type of strength you are developing
The load used in the exercise
Number of muscle groups used in the exercise
Your condition
Your weight
A recovery of three to five minutes or longer will allow almost the complete restoration of ATP/CP.

Rest Interval between sessions
The energy source being used during the training session is probably the most important factor to consider. During the maximum strength phase, when you are primarily using the ATP/CP energy pathway, daily training is possible because ATP/CP restoration is completed within 24 hours. If you are training for muscular endurance (muscle definition) then you require a 48 hour recovery as this is how long it takes to fully restore your glycogen stores (Piehl, 1974; Fox et al, 1989).

As a 'rule of thumb' 48 hours should elapse between sessions. If training strenuously, any athlete will find it extremely difficult to maintain the same level of lifting at each session, and the total poundage lifted in each session would be better to be varied (e.g. a high, low and medium volume session) each week.

What sort of weight lifting equipment ?
There are variable resistance machines and free weights. Variable resistance machines are effective tools for building strength and muscle tone and are designed to work the target muscle in isolation, without the assistance of the surrounding muscles. Free weights (barbells, dumbbells and machines that provide the same equal resistance to a muscle) allow you not only to target a particular muscle group but to engage other muscles that assist in the work. Once they are conditioned, these assisting muscles help you to increase the weight you use in training the target muscles in order to stimulate the most growth in muscle fibres. The assisting muscles help stabilize the body, support limbs and maintain posture during a lift. Lifting free weights improves your coordination by improving the neuromuscular pathways that connect your muscles to the central nervous system.

Training Systems
Simple Sets e.g. 3 x 8 with 70% - meaning three sets of eight repetitions with a weight of 70% of maximum for one repetition. This is the system that all novice lifters should work on, because the high number of repetitions enables the lifter to learn correct technique, and thereby reduce the risk of injury.

Pyramid System Here the load is increased and the repetitions are reduced (e.g. 100kg x 10, 120kg x 5, 130kg x 4, 140kg x 3, 150kg x 2, 160kg x 1). Pyramid lifting is only for experienced lifters who have an established good technique.

Super Setting This consists of performing two or three exercises continuously, without rest in between sets, until all exercises have been performed. The normal 'between sets' rest is taken before the next circuit of exercises is commenced.

Training Programs
Use the above notes to assist you in the preparation of a general strength training program, to develop your general strength, and a specific strength training program to develop your specific strength to meet to the demands of your event/sport.

If weight training facilities is limited to your home and a set of dumbbells then it is still possible to construct a dumbbell weight training program.

To monitor progress in training you should conduct strength and muscle balance tests.

Safety in the Weight Room
Strength training is safe when properly supervised and controlled. Every weight room should have a set of of rues and regulations pertaining to safety and they should be on public display. Rules may vary from one weight room to another but some very basic rules apply to them all:

Train only when a qualified coach is present
Follow your training schedule
Work in pairs - one lifting the other spotting
No horseplay
Wear the correct clothing and shoes
No eating, drinking or smoking
No personal stereos with headphones
Help and respect other athletes
Only athletes who are working out should be in the weight room
Make sure you and your athletes are fully aware of the safety rules applying to the weight training room(s) you use.



Hope this helps,just be careful or you will be going through shoulder problems like myself .to make a long story short,I made the muscles too big on the tops of my shoulders,and now they are pulling the joint apart (hurts like heck).so,If I dont strengthen the bottoms,I will need surgery to fix this. problem

NaboCane
03-26-2006, 10:04 PM
Don't do too much...nothing grows as fast as you want it to, including your muscles.

Eat well, eat balanced, account for the extra expenditure of energy by incresing protein intake.

Don't eat too much as a result.

Take the long view, don't go measuring your guns every day, make a decision that this is a new way of life for you, not a "program."

Work muscles to exhaustion. Anything less is bull****.

ILPhinFan88
03-26-2006, 10:10 PM
Wow, Calphin has the info

Roman529
03-26-2006, 10:18 PM
Did Chuck Norris work out before fighting Bruce Lee and Kareem??? :lol:

OK then.

Buddwalk
03-26-2006, 10:28 PM
But if you want a little bit of info see if you can top me Im 120-125 lbs. I can bench 110 lbs 10 times

Dolfan984
03-26-2006, 10:42 PM
wow calphin you're the man.

Whomever said work it to failure or else it's bull**** is right.

Whatever you do though bro, don't overdo it and make sure you always have a spotter.

dolfan72734me
03-26-2006, 10:56 PM
I pormise you for a fact that I WILL start to lift weights tomorow. The question is how should my workout week look like? Do I need to take every other day off or is it ok to work out 20 minutes a day for 4 or 5 days straight?
One hour per workout, 1-2 body parts per workout. 3-4 sets per exercise. 8-10 reps per set. Weight amount should be about where you reach failure by that 10th rep. Give each body part about a week of recovery before hitting it again. Nothing bothers me more in the gym than seeing someone do benches every single day. You will never grow that way. When you lift to build muscle, little micro tears occur. Growth occurs from the recovery of those tears. If you can't recover, you can't grow.
Drink lots of water. Diet should be about 60/30/10 carbs/protein/fat. Get could complex carbs, and good fats. Meals should be about 5-7 small meals per day. Take a quick digesting protein source immediatley after workout, as your muscle cells are primed for nutrient uptake. Whey Isolate is a quick digesting protein. Whey Concentrate and Micellar Casein are good slower digesting proteins that are good throughout the day, and right before bed.
Before getting into other supplements, make sure your diet is as sound as possible. Remember, supplement means, to help out, not take the place of.
A good multi vitamin is important. So is a good antioxidant, which will help fight any free radicals that can occur from training. A good essential fat source, like Omega 3, 6,and 9, flax seed oil, and primrose oil are very good. they actually help the body utilize bad fats to be burned for energy. Essential fatty acids are also a base for all natural hormone production.
P.M. me if you have any questions.

dolfan72734me
03-26-2006, 11:09 PM
wow calphin you're the man.

Whomever said work it to failure or else it's bull**** is right.

Whatever you do though bro, don't overdo it and make sure you always have a spotter.
Sure, if you are trying to maintain muscle. Training to failure is not the same thing as overtraining. It is a great idea to start off slowly and not over do it. Don't just jump into weights that are to heavy for you to handle in good form. You do not have to lift more than anyone else to grow. Use correct form with a weight you can handle, or else you are looking for injury.
But don't just lift weights to to be going through the motions. If you can keep on and keep on lifting that weight without going to failure, you are not applying enough stress and resistive force to tear down the muscle. And you have to tear it down to build it up through recovery.You need to make each rep count. Or what is the point.

FinsNCanes
03-27-2006, 12:35 AM
This thread actually intrigued me. I started working out about 2 months ago 3-4 days a week an hour a day but then got really sick this month and had to take 2 weeks off and just coudln't get back into it. Recently I've started getting back into my groove and I'm sucking wind hard. The problem here is though I want to lose like 10 MAYBE 15 pounds by running (although I heard lifting works just as well cause it burns up fat) but I smoke atleast a half a pack a day. Although I was running 2 miles a night at one point which isn't TOO bad for a smoker.

dolfan72734me
03-27-2006, 01:19 AM
This thread actually intrigued me. I started working out about 2 months ago 3-4 days a week an hour a day but then got really sick this month and had to take 2 weeks off and just coudln't get back into it. Recently I've started getting back into my groove and I'm sucking wind hard. The problem here is though I want to lose like 10 MAYBE 15 pounds by running (although I heard lifting works just as well cause it burns up fat) but I smoke atleast a half a pack a day. Although I was running 2 miles a night at one point which isn't TOO bad for a smoker.
It is definately hard sometimes to get back into it after a lay off. And yes, they are finding out now that a good weight lifting program can burn as much fat as aerobic exercises.

Agent51
03-27-2006, 01:58 AM
But if you want a little bit of info see if you can top me Im 120-125 lbs. I can bench 110 lbs 10 times

Currently 177 and I can do 165 24 times. :wink: . When I'm training for the football season (play in an adult semi-pro league) my weight goes up both physically and in how much I can bench.

And Budd, why did you tell him not to workout in your first post? You said you don't encourage it for the reasons he wants to, play music instead. I'm not familiar with the reasons he wants to, but if I HAD to guess it would be for a fight maybe, judging by the way you don't want him to? I don't know Ace nor have I seen him post anything about fighting, but if that IS the reason, I'm sorry to say that lifting weights won't make you a better fighter. Especially since if you don't lift at all then start lifting it's going to be awhile before you see results (assuming you do it naturally) so by the time you get big enough to fight someone you prolly won't even be mad at them anymore. But like I said, muscle and being able to lift a lot does NOT make you a better fighter. I'm not even sure that is the reason Ace wants to lift, but from what Budd posted it seems like a logical explaination.

Anyway, Calphin's advice is great

Agent51
03-27-2006, 02:12 AM
This thread actually intrigued me. I started working out about 2 months ago 3-4 days a week an hour a day but then got really sick this month and had to take 2 weeks off and just coudln't get back into it. Recently I've started getting back into my groove and I'm sucking wind hard. The problem here is though I want to lose like 10 MAYBE 15 pounds by running (although I heard lifting works just as well cause it burns up fat) but I smoke atleast a half a pack a day. Although I was running 2 miles a night at one point which isn't TOO bad for a smoker.

Yea man, I got really sick back in January. I went on a surf trip to Morocco and I got bit by a weird spider and that thing TOOK ME OUT. I had Flu-like symptoms for almost 2 weeks straight. I lost TWENTY-SEVEN pounds in those two weeks simply from all the vomitting and "other stuff" and the fact that I could keep no foods or liquids down. This obviously meant my daily workout was out of the question. Even after my vomitting (and "other stuff" lol) was over my stomach still felt shaky when I would drink or eat so it was a few more days til I could keep anything but a few crackers down, and I was so week from losing all that weight/muscle so fast that I had to start like COMPLETELY over, like when I first started working out again, with little 20lb dumbells and benching like 80lbs. It was SUPER discouraging and made me feel like a weak little wuss, haha. But thankfully my progress shot up and I was back to my normal, pre-sick workout in like 5 or 6 weeks.

As ar as shedding pounds, I'd say mix the running with weights. If you smoke 2 packs a day and haven't worked out in awhile, you prolly can't jump right back into a 2 mile run a day. I'd suggest maybe 30 minutes of JOGGING (not full on running) daily, along with your normal weight routine. Or do like 30 miutes of walking and jogging combined. Like jog for a minute then walk for 2 (or whatever time combo you are comfortable with) everyday, plus your weights. Eventually you will be able to work back up to a full on jog for 2 miles.

Buddwalk
03-27-2006, 02:54 AM
Currently 177 and I can do 165 24 times. :wink: . When I'm training for the football season (play in an adult semi-pro league) my weight goes up both physically and in how much I can bench.

And Budd, why did you tell him not to workout in your first post? You said you don't encourage it for the reasons he wants to, play music instead. I'm not familiar with the reasons he wants to, but if I HAD to guess it would be for a fight maybe, judging by the way you don't want him to? I don't know Ace nor have I seen him post anything about fighting, but if that IS the reason, I'm sorry to say that lifting weights won't make you a better fighter. Especially since if you don't lift at all then start lifting it's going to be awhile before you see results (assuming you do it naturally) so by the time you get big enough to fight someone you prolly won't even be mad at them anymore. But like I said, muscle and being able to lift a lot does NOT make you a better fighter. I'm not even sure that is the reason Ace wants to lift, but from what Budd posted it seems like a logical explaination.

Anyway, Calphin's advice is great

He wanted to get big to prove to people that he wasnt a weakling or something along the lines of that. I thought it was a dumb reason and honestly I still do. Getting big should be if your in sports or some kind of activity, not because you want to prove people wrong. Prove them wrong 10 years down the line when you show them how your pay check has 2 more zeros then theres :wink:

dolfan72734me
03-27-2006, 03:12 AM
He wanted to get big to prove to people that he wasnt a weakling or something along the lines of that. I thought it was a dumb reason and honestly I still do. Getting big should be if your in sports or some kind of activity, not because you want to prove people wrong. Prove them wrong 10 years down the line when you show them how your pay check has 2 more zeros then theres :wink:
Oh, dag, I didn't realize that was the reason. You are absolutely correct there. I started to work out to enter a amateur contest a few years back. I never entered, but I loved knowing that I could compete if I did.

Agent51
03-27-2006, 05:10 AM
He wanted to get big to prove to people that he wasnt a weakling or something along the lines of that. I thought it was a dumb reason and honestly I still do. Getting big should be if your in sports or some kind of activity, not because you want to prove people wrong. Prove them wrong 10 years down the line when you show them how your pay check has 2 more zeros then theres :wink:

Ah, now I get it. Your right in that that may not be the best reason, but you don't have to workout JUST for sports, you can work out just becse you want your body to look, and having a good body doesn't urt with the ladies either :wink:

FinsNCanes
03-27-2006, 10:51 PM
Ace if you want to learn how to fight go learn some quick pressure point moves. Those things suck.