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JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 12:57 AM
the harry potter thread got me thinking

mine would be THE RULES: Time-Tested Secrets for Capturing the Heart of Mr. Right by Ellen Fein and Sherrie SHamoon (used to be Schneider, now shes divorced)

freshmen year of undergrad i took a class on strategy as a freshmen seminar, and the teacher made us read this book (yea he was a dude, making it worse)

i cant even begin to describe how awful this book, and that it legitimately tells women to be materialistic and shallow because that will lead to happiness boggles my mind

the irony in all of this is that both women ended up getting divorced a couple of years ago

King Felix
08-03-2006, 01:00 AM
whats a book:confused:

Slappy8800
08-03-2006, 01:03 AM
read?`

TitansFanatic
08-03-2006, 01:10 AM
I hated having to read Animal Farm in AP 9th grade English.

Probably cause of the paper we had to write.

Silverphin
08-03-2006, 01:21 AM
I personally thought "A Seperate Peace" sucked ***.

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 01:27 AM
I personally thought "A Seperate Peace" sucked ***.
my brother was in the movie Showtime put out a couple of years back, basically so kids would watch the movie instead of reading the book. he played "Leper". not a huge fan of the book either. the movie's out on dvd which is kinda funny to me.



I hated having to read Animal Farm in AP 9th grade English.

seriously??? one of my favorite books...gotta love the political satire

and what were doing taking AP english in 9th grade??

NaboCane
08-03-2006, 01:56 AM
Anything by Dickens. Overrated schmuck with a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children, and he's the darling of every English professor with a giant stick up his ***, and who probably himself has a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children.

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 02:04 AM
Anything by Dickens. Overrated schmuck with a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children, and he's the darling of every English professor with a giant stick up his ***, and who probably himself has a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children.



amen!

Gonzo
08-03-2006, 02:14 AM
Anything by Dickens. Overrated schmuck with a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children, and he's the darling of every English professor with a giant stick up his ***, and who probably himself has a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children.Not to mention the fact that he is boring as **** to read.

Gonzo
08-03-2006, 02:15 AM
Tough question. I tend to block them from my memory. First one that comes to mind is Speaker of the Dead by Orson Scott Card. It might have been disappointment after reading Ender's Game, which I loved despite not really liking Sci Fi books.

Recently, I read In the Eagle's Shadow: The United States and Latin America by Kyle Longely (previously a prof. at my school). Now, I am not a huge fan of American foreign policy, but this book argues that every single problem in Latin America is caused by the U.S. in one way or another. It's one of the most one-sided books I have ever had to read.

NaboCane
08-03-2006, 02:18 AM
Not to mention the fact that he is boring as **** to read.

...and that! Worst sin any author can commit.

TitansFanatic
08-03-2006, 02:19 AM
my brother was in the movie Showtime put out a couple of years back, basically so kids would watch the movie instead of reading the book. he played "Leper". not a huge fan of the book either. the movie's out on dvd which is kinda funny to me.




seriously??? one of my favorite books...gotta love the political satire

and what were doing taking AP english in 9th grade??

I took AP English 9th, 10th, and 12th. One subject I was actually good at...lol.

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 02:21 AM
Tough question. I tend to block them from my memory. First one that comes to mind is Speaker of the Dead by Orson Scott Card. It might have been disappointment after reading Ender's Game, which I loved despite not really liking Sci Fi books.

Recently, I read In the Eagle's Shadow: The United States and Latin America by Kyle Longely (previously a prof. at my school). Now, I am not a huge fan of American foreign policy, but this book argues that every single problem in Latin America is caused by the U.S. in one way or another. It's one of the most one-sided books I have ever had to read.

HOLY SH-T DUDE!!!! i had to read this for US/Latin American Relations (senior seminar) last year

awful....everyday wed criticize it in class...not really the everything is the US's problem (every book on latin america contends it, and the truth is the US is responsible) but the writing and language was pathetic. I mean did he have an editor???? our teacher needed something that was a steady book to pace the course, and was basically forced to use this as a constant, but even she hated the quality of it

content wise, he is a bit off on parts, conflicts himself a lot as well.

but the more you study latin american relations, its hard not to find the US at fault (also because latin america overexaggerates our interest in them). ultimately, the US just doesnt care, the countries in latin america just think we do. and cuse they think everything we do is somehow related to them (maybe cuse of the monroe doctrine) they use the US as an antagonist


in the history of latin america, everytime something that ultimately hurt the latin american people happened, there was a bunch of rich white americans making money near by. its hard not to blame the US when there are so many consistant instances of this
__________________

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 02:29 AM
I took AP English 9th, 10th, and 12th. One subject I was actually good at...lol.

i didnt know they offered it in 9th and 10th, i thought just 11th and 12th

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 02:31 AM
Davinci Code

ever read the one he plagerized from? Holy Blood, Holy Grail? basically the historical basis of the book, dan brown took the stories and tied them together with fictional connections that never existed

dominizzo
08-03-2006, 02:32 AM
Davinci Code

Miamian
08-03-2006, 06:30 AM
Anything by Dickens. Overrated schmuck with a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children, and he's the darling of every English professor with a giant stick up his ***, and who probably himself has a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children.
Nabo, tell us how you really feel about Dickens.

Miamian
08-03-2006, 06:36 AM
A few candidates:

1. The Scarlet Letter. FCOL, couldn't Hawthorne put less than a dozen subjects into one paragraph?

2. Being Alien by Rebecca Ore. I bought it from a sales table. Very anticlimatic ending.

3. The Name of The Rose I might be in the minority in this one; I found it overblown.

4. Heart of Darkness Joseph Conrad was the equivalent of Stephen King for is time.

5. Aliens Among Us The author, I don't remember who it is, theorizes that we were genetically engineered by intelligent dinosaurs who live under the earth's surface and that they are the ones responsible for UFO's.

SkapePhin
08-03-2006, 09:07 AM
ever read the one he plagerized from? Holy Blood, Holy Grail? basically the historical basis of the book, dan brown took the stories and tied them together with fictional connections that never existed


Its not plagerism if you cite your sources, as Brown did..

Anyway, worst book? Probably most of Shakespeare's work - mainly because I cannot stand Old English ..

I tend not to read books I dont enjoy.. I do all my research on the books before I purchase them. So I have enjoyed every book that I have read on my own.

Jimmy James
08-03-2006, 09:55 AM
A few thoughts...

I haven't read much Dickens, but I don't mind him based on what I have read.

The Scarlet Letter is at the top of my list. It's sad this is on what seems like every high school reading list because it SUCKS. Hawthorne did other work I read at one point that was a lot better than this book was.

I liked Heart of Darkness once I read it a second time, but it was nearly incomprehensible the first time I read it for whatever reason. That could have been because I waited until the night before my senior year started to read the whole summer reading list for my AP English class. It was tough to get through this one that night after having read the book of Job and various other things.

Tess of the d'Ubervilles is another book on my list. It was terrible.

My final book is Light in August. I love most of Faulkner's other work, but this one just didn't do anything for me.

poornate
08-03-2006, 10:54 AM
I cannot believe someone said Animal Farm....
Also, Speaker for the Dead is a really good book in a really uninteresting genre. Rarely does sf really get to the heart of the human element in the story. I strongly recommend it to anyone who is a fan of philosophy or writing that questions morals.

Now that I have repudiated others....worst book for me has to be A Death In The Family by James Agee....only because it is touted as an American classic and I found it boring and pointless...

Buddwalk
08-03-2006, 11:18 AM
worst book...no clue really but the best book by far was And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie :yes:

SkapePhin
08-03-2006, 11:20 AM
I cannot believe someone said Animal Farm....
Also, Speaker for the Dead is a really good book in a really uninteresting genre. Rarely does sf really get to the heart of the human element in the story. I strongly recommend it to anyone who is a fan of philosophy or writing that questions morals.

Now that I have repudiated others....worst book for me has to be A Death In The Family by James Agee....only because it is touted as an American classic and I found it boring and pointless...


You havent read much Heinlein I take it?

Miamian
08-03-2006, 11:43 AM
worst book...no clue really but the best book by far was And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie :yes:
I remember reading that in 10th grade.

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 11:43 AM
Jane Eyre is up there for me...never been a fan of the bronte sisters

dQbell
08-03-2006, 01:57 PM
Anything by Dickens. Overrated schmuck with a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children, and he's the darling of every English professor with a giant stick up his ***, and who probably himself has a sick interest in the corporal punishment and suffering of children.

You know, that's the first author I thought of when I read this post's heading.

DolfanDaveInATX
08-03-2006, 02:03 PM
"Sun Tzu was a Sissy" by Stanley Bing. This guy is supposed to be some management genius but this book reads like a high school class project from the obnoxious kid you want to grab by his underwear and pull it over his head.

One of the chapters in this book consisted of two paragraphs. I'm not kidding.

Gonzo
08-03-2006, 02:13 PM
Its not plagerism if you cite your sources, as Brown did..

Anyway, worst book? Probably most of Shakespeare's work - mainly because I cannot stand Old English ..

I tend not to read books I dont enjoy.. I do all my research on the books before I purchase them. So I have enjoyed every book that I have read on my own.

Not to mention the fact that the idea itself was nothing new.

Gonzo
08-03-2006, 02:19 PM
HOLY SH-T DUDE!!!! i had to read this for US/Latin American Relations (senior seminar) last year

awful....everyday wed criticize it in class...not really the everything is the US's problem (every book on latin america contends it, and the truth is the US is responsible) but the writing and language was pathetic. I mean did he have an editor???? our teacher needed something that was a steady book to pace the course, and was basically forced to use this as a constant, but even she hated the quality of it

content wise, he is a bit off on parts, conflicts himself a lot as well.

but the more you study latin american relations, its hard not to find the US at fault (also because latin america overexaggerates our interest in them). ultimately, the US just doesnt care, the countries in latin america just think we do. and cuse they think everything we do is somehow related to them (maybe cuse of the monroe doctrine) they use the US as an antagonist


in the history of latin america, everytime something that ultimately hurt the latin american people happened, there was a bunch of rich white americans making money near by. its hard not to blame the US when there are so many consistant instances of this
__________________

Sorry, but I have to disagree. While the U.S. (in the form of businessmen, if they can cause us to lump all Americans into this) can be held partially at fault, I think it is a simplistic approach to problems. They take no responsibility whatsoever and this book was an example of this. They totally ignore the fact that a lot of their problems are homegrown and their complete unwillingness to do anything about it other than point the finger north. I have studied U.S./Latin American relations and I find that if all else fails, blame America. Sorry, but it just far to simple an approach.

On top of that, it was horribly written.

PassRush
08-03-2006, 02:32 PM
I dont read books I dont like. If I am five pages in and I am not curious about the content of page six, I will put the book down and never pick it up again

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 02:37 PM
Sorry, but I have to disagree. While the U.S. (in the form of businessmen, if they can cause us to lump all Americans into this) can be held partially at fault, I think it is a simplistic approach to problems. They take no responsibility whatsoever and this book was an example of this. They totally ignore the fact that a lot of their problems are homegrown and their complete unwillingness to do anything about it other than point the finger north. I have studied U.S./Latin American relations and I find that if all else fails, blame America. Sorry, but it just far to simple an approach.

On top of that, it was horribly written.

i agree with that, but its also simplistic to say they are not caused by america just because latin americans blame everything on us. weve done a lot of things not intended to hurt latin america, but do anyways. just because we didnt intend to screw them doesnt mean we didnt

i think the US does take a lot of blame from problems that were caused by the role of Christianity in latin america, and the book doesnt place enough significance on this
Catholicism and CHrisitianity in general has caused a lot of the problems in latin america, but the US is blamed for these anyways (some of the local memoirs reveal lots of antipathy for the europeans who brought catholocism and the values accompanied with it)

but yes the book is awfully written, i mean piss poor

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 02:54 PM
anyone ever read any Ibn Khaldun? basically the islamic Machiavelli

amazing stuff, one of the more interesting reads ive had (although hard to get through some of it)

HolliFinFan
08-03-2006, 02:56 PM
I find this thread interesting. Some of the classic novels mentioned--Animal Farm, Jane Eyre, etc.--are some of my favorites. Someone mentioned A Separate Peace. That novel is two-fold--Gene's struggle with his latent homosexuality and the parallels of WWII. I can see how some might find it boring though. Most people don't understand the themes, and teachers rarely address the novel's true intent.
Nabo, you don't like any Dickens? I enjoy the satire of the English in Great Expectations AND in Oliver Twist.
Additionally, The Scarlet Letter is a fabulous novel, ripe with religious hypocrisy and symbolism, IMO.
The worst book (classic) I can remember reading in undergrad is A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man. I did reread it later, and found more merit in the book, yet it still was a struggle to get through.
Finally, someone mentioned Shakespeare's writings being penned in Old English. Actually, they're not even in Middle English. Believe it or not, that writing is contemporary English, in archaic style. :wink:
I wish some of y'all had had better teachers for the novels mentioned. :shakeno:
~~Holli

SkapePhin
08-03-2006, 03:01 PM
I find this thread interesting. Some of the classic novels mentioned--Animal Farm, Jane Eyre, etc.--are some of my favorites. Someone mentioned A Separate Peace. That novel is two-fold--Gene's struggle with his latent homosexuality and the parallels of WWII. I can see how some might find it boring though. Most people don't understand the themes, and teachers rarely address the novel's true intent.
Nabo, you don't like any Dickens? I enjoy the satire of the English in Great Expectations AND in Oliver Twist.
Additionally, The Scarlet Letter is a fabulous novel, ripe with religious hypocrisy and symbolism, IMO.
The worst book (classic) I can remember reading in undergrad is A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man. I did reread it later, and found more merit in the book, yet it still was a struggle to get through.
Finally, someone mentioned Shakespeare's writings being penned in Old English. Actually, they're not even in Middle English. Believe it or not, that writing is contemporary English, in archaic style. :wink:
I wish some of y'all had had better teachers for the novels mentioned. :shakeno:
~~Holli

Hmm.. I always figured they were translated (modernized) from Olde English.. Oh well, it still makes my head spin.

DrAstroZoom
08-03-2006, 03:06 PM
The worst book (classic) I can remember reading in undergrad is A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man. I did reread it later, and found more merit in the book, yet it still was a struggle to get through.

~~Holli

Oh Lord, and Ulysses? Torture.

Reading James Joyce is like being forced to look through Coke bottles for an hour, then being smacked on the back of the head.

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 03:07 PM
The worst book (classic) I can remember reading in undergrad is A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man. I did reread it later, and found more merit in the book, yet it still was a struggle to get through.
~~Holli

had to read that i think sophmore year of undergrad. never read it though we ran out of time in the class and that was the first book to get scrapped

its not that i dont like the quality of Jayne Eyre, the story just rubs me the wrong way type of thing. i preferred Wuthering Heights, probably the only Bronte sisters book i enjoyed

i didnt mind A separate Peace its kind of necessary to read at that age cuse of its coming of age implications, i just get bored with those story lines (as good as Catcher in the Rye is, i also just get borred with the coming of age motiff)

i love shakespeare, can't agree with those who dis him

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 03:08 PM
yea joyce was an intersting read, i think i needed to be drinking more at the point in my life when i read Ulyses

HolliFinFan
08-03-2006, 03:09 PM
Oh Lord, and Ulysses? Torture.

Reading James Joyce is like being forced to look through Coke bottles for an hour, then being smacked on the back of the head.

:sidelol: Exactly. Did you ever read As I Lay Dying? A little more interesting, yet that same simile applies.
~~Holli

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 03:10 PM
http://www.finheaven.com/images/imported/2006/08/B0006Q93YM01_SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V110306383-1.jpg

my brother is the second from the left (danny swerdlow)..the one with his hand on his chest or whatever

HolliFinFan
08-03-2006, 03:17 PM
Hmm.. I always figured they were translated (modernized) from Olde English.. Oh well, it still makes my head spin.

Now that you're older, you'd probably "get" all of his sexual puns and recognize his brilliance as a human psychologist via his characters' words and actions. If you ever get bored, maybe try reading him again? I'd recommend starting with Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth.
~~Holli

HolliFinFan
08-03-2006, 03:19 PM
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/B0006Q93YM.01._SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V1103063837_.jpg

my brother is the second from the left (danny swerdlow)..the one with his hand on his chest or whatever

Awesome! I've not seen that version.
~~Holli

JSwerdy
08-03-2006, 03:27 PM
Now that you're older, you'd probably "get" all of his sexual puns and recognize his brilliance as a human psychologist via his characters' words and actions. If you ever get bored, maybe try reading him again? I'd recommend starting with Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth.
~~Holli

i remember in 10th grade our teacher having to explain to us what a "Fishmongerer" really meant, as in the sexual pun of a prostitute or a pimp

Roman529
08-03-2006, 04:16 PM
Probably a book I read in grad school on Urban Planning.

Miamian
08-03-2006, 04:36 PM
Probably a book I read in grad school on Urban Planning.
Ouch. That's my profession, which book was it?

OurHeartAndSoul
08-03-2006, 06:01 PM
Going into freshman year we had to read The Source by James Michener. One of the most boring books I have ever picked up.

ih8brady
08-03-2006, 07:33 PM
I couldnt finish reading the Da Vinci Code. cardboard characters, dull prose, USA Today language and ridiculous action by the characters.

There's also this Sociology book I had to read called Race, Class, and Gender and it was awful. The class was supposed to be on gender in society but the book was a bunch of articles written by political pundits like (I kid you not) USA Today's Julianne Malveaux and mainly features rambling against capitalism, white people and praises for people like Louis Farrakhan. The sad thing is the book doesnt even attempt to use sociological language or surveys, just political screed.

PHANTASTIC 13
08-03-2006, 10:39 PM
Randy Moss' autobiography..."Just Throw Me the Damn Ball" the guy is a real turd.

Roman529
08-04-2006, 02:02 AM
Ouch. That's my profession, which book was it?

I can't remember the name of the book but it was really dry. I have a master's degree in public administration with a concentration in urban management and planning. Most of my studies were interesting, particular books detailing the development of urban core areas and transportation systems by Robert Moses. I think the book I read dealt a little too much with economics and statistics...it was pretty dull.

DolphinDevil28
08-04-2006, 02:33 AM
Randy Moss' autobiography..."Just Throw Me the Damn Ball" the guy is a real turd.

That was Keyshawn Johnson.

DolphinDevil28
08-04-2006, 02:35 AM
My sophomore year at LSU I was forced to read "Sense and Sensability."

:barf::barf::barf:

Miamian
08-04-2006, 09:11 AM
I can't remember the name of the book but it was really dry. I have a master's degree in public administration with a concentration in urban management and planning. Most of my studies were interesting, particular books detailing the development of urban core areas and transportation systems by Robert Moses. I think the book I read dealt a little too much with economics and statistics...it was pretty dull.
That can be dry, but a lot depends on the delivery. When you have to perform sophisticated statistical analyses like Z-scores, it can get more interesting. Economics are more interesting in Jacobs.

Jaydog57
08-04-2006, 09:42 AM
I think the worst book I had to read was my US government book in high school. God, politics is so damn BORING.:sleep:

Gonzo
08-04-2006, 11:27 AM
I can't remember the name of the book but it was really dry. I have a master's degree in public administration with a concentration in urban management and planning. Most of my studies were interesting, particular books detailing the development of urban core areas and transportation systems by Robert Moses. I think the book I read dealt a little too much with economics and statistics...it was pretty dull.

Speaking of Public Admin. The book I am reading for the class I am taking right now (P.A.) is pretty bad. Public Administration in the New Century by Jeffrey D. Greene. First off, it's boring as hell and extremely repetative. Then he spends half the book attempting to convince us why bureaucracy is more than just a necessary evil and trying to show that a lot of the ideas about it are myths (red tape, etc.). The rest of the book goes on to explain how the myths are actually true, completely contradicting himself. This book is red tape.

DrAstroZoom
08-04-2006, 11:33 AM
Fundamentals of Insurance for Financial Planning by Beam, Bicklehaupt, Crowe and Poole.

NaboCane
08-04-2006, 11:33 AM
Speaking of Public Admin. The book I am reading for the class I am taking right now (P.A.) is pretty bad. Public Administration in the New Century by Jeffrey D. Greene. First off, it's boring as hell and extremely repetative. Then he spends half the book attempting to convince us why bureaucracy is more than just a necessary evil and trying to show that a lot of the ideas about it are myths (red tape, etc.). The rest of the book goes on to explain how the myths are actually true, completely contradicting himself. This book is red tape.

:lol: Sounds like it should be surrounded by yellow tape.

CrunchTime
08-04-2006, 11:47 AM
Going into freshman year we had to read The Source by James Michener. One of the most boring books I have ever picked up.

A good book....if you are interested in Archeology and History.Its about a mound that has been formed by the rubble of hundreds of years of settlements and fictional stories revolving around the people who habitated them.Very well researched as most of Michners books are.

Not for everyone but I am history buff so I like historical novels if they are well researched.:wink: