PDA

View Full Version : It's Rated "R." Who Brought The Kids?



BAMAPHIN 22
01-27-2007, 10:47 PM
Movie Industry Considering Adding Specific Admonishment To Parents Over Graphic Films

When Kate Attea went to see Steven Spielberg's "Munich" last year – an R-rated film with themes of terrorism and revenge and with graphic portrayals of sex and violence – she was shocked to see a 7- or 8-year-old girl sitting behind her, occasionally asking her parents about the on-screen violence before her.


"It seems very obtuse of parents to think that has no effect at all," says Attea, a Chicago mother of a 1-year-old. She still remembers being "traumatized for years" after seeing "Poltergeist" in the third grade.


Even as parents push for more consistency in movie ratings and theater owners feel the pressure to keep unaccompanied teens out of "R" movies, the reality is that many parents choose – some thoughtfully, some casually – to take young teens and even preschoolers to those movies with them.

The movie industry now is considering amending its ratings system to include this new and specific admonishment to parents: Many R-rated movies are unsuitable for young children.

The exact wording has yet to be decided, but the change is being made in response to "complaints from people who go to R-rated movies and are disturbed to see young children in there," says Kori Bernards, a spokeswoman for the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). The admonishment is part of the industry's broader plan, announced last week, to try to make the rating system clearer and its process more transparent.


"Parents have life experience, kids don't, and it's important to realize that the way their child experiences [a movie] is very different than the way they do," says Kimberly Thompson, a health-policy professor at Harvard and the director of the Kids Risk Project. She encourages parents to seek information about a movie ahead of time, and if they do allow their child to see it, to watch it with them and discuss it later. "Movies can give kids experiences that may influence their attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors, and it's important for parents to talk about any content they're experiencing," she says.



http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/01/25/entertainment/main2398472.shtml

HysterikiLL
01-28-2007, 12:08 AM
In the States, an R means you can take kids into the films as long as they're with a parent or guardian right?

Here in NZ, we have R16 and R18. If you're under the age of the given classification, you can't get it. Doesn't matter if you're wearing a fake beard and a balding cap. Trust me, I've tried. :foundout:

Rafiki
01-28-2007, 01:11 AM
Why don't people just mind their own buisness and let parents raise their kids. It may not be ethically sound to take a kid to a rated-R movie, but there are many things in life which are just as damaging.

There is a rating, NC-17, which no one under the age of 17 is admitted. If the industry feels the need to lower the standards by which the rating is to apply, then so be it.

ih8brady
01-28-2007, 01:38 AM
Why don't people just mind their own buisness and let parents raise their kids. It may not be ethically sound to take a kid to a rated-R movie, but there are many things in life which are just as damaging.

There is a rating, NC-17, which no one under the age of 17 is admitted. If the industry feels the need to lower the standards by which the rating is to apply, then so be it.


Agreed. Far too common is this dictatorial tendencies to control every decision and action of everyone else's personal life. Even if this nanny attitude were justified, which it is not, the rating system is very ridiculous giving R rating to a film simply because it uses the F word more than once and the same rating to a film which uses much more profanity, violence and sex. Besides, ratings are guidelines not tablets of clay from Mt Olympus.

Metal Panda
01-28-2007, 12:35 PM
haha, additional admonishment?

"The following motion picture is rated R. If there are children in the room...parents...you should be ashamed of yourselves. We here at the MPAA do not approve. Thank you."

KingCrowder
01-28-2007, 12:45 PM
Why don't people just mind their own buisness and let parents raise their kids. It may not be ethically sound to take a kid to a rated-R movie, but there are many things in life which are just as damaging.

There is a rating, NC-17, which no one under the age of 17 is admitted. If the industry feels the need to lower the standards by which the rating is to apply, then so be it.



Yes, If you don't want your kids to see a Movie, play a VIDEO game, or watch a certain TV show then by all means don't let them. Me personally I let my kids know that Movies and TV shows are FAKE and Video Games, we'll i'm not even getting into that.

A kid is not going to be a psycho killer just because they watch a slasher film. that is what parenting is for.

spydertl79
01-28-2007, 04:05 PM
I respect a parent's right to bring their kids to whatever movies they please.

Pennington's Rocket Arm
01-28-2007, 04:34 PM
the woman was "traumatized" by The Poltergeist. but...she seems fine now, right? obviously she's kind of nosey but she should be living proof to herself that maybe it's not that big of a deal at all, ultimately.

Caps
01-28-2007, 04:44 PM
My parents let me watch R rated movies since I was 5 years old(not at the theater though, VHS). I loved me some Schwarzenneger and Stallone movies back then, still do. I stayed away from scary movies cause it just never interested me.

At the same time, I don't like it when parents take their kids to R-rated movies, mostly for selfish reasons. Trying to wrap my head around Miami Vice while the kid next to me won't shut up about "Why did this happen? Why did they shoot that guy? Why does he like her?" is annoying. If they're mature enough to see a movie and behave the way everyone else is and handle the themes of the film, I've got no beef. If not, please wait for the DVD people.

Phinz420
01-28-2007, 05:28 PM
My parents let me watch R rated movies since I was 5 years old(not at the theater though, VHS). I loved me some Schwarzenneger and Stallone movies back then, still do. I stayed away from scary movies cause it just never interested me.

At the same time, I don't like it when parents take their kids to R-rated movies, mostly for selfish reasons. Trying to wrap my head around Miami Vice while the kid next to me won't shut up about "Why did this happen? Why did they shoot that guy? Why does he like her?" is annoying. If they're mature enough to see a movie and behave the way everyone else is and handle the themes of the film, I've got no beef. If not, please wait for the DVD people.

Well said.

Metal Panda
01-28-2007, 05:55 PM
I do think there are some movies that children shouldn't be exposed to before they are ready...but I agree with the general consensus of this thread that people should be allowed to parent as fit.

I don't really think all R rated movies **** up children too much, I mean I saw my share. Just depends what they are and why they're rated R. Extremely violent movies can trivialize and romanticize violence for children if overexposed, but not all movies are rated R for that reason.

I am generally angry, to steal a page from the Ruthless Reviews website, at how every attempt at censorship these days always revolves around "think about the children".

dunno about you, but some of the kids I grew up with were vile little *******s....not the innocent little gnomes the media makes them out to be :)

Phinz420
01-28-2007, 05:56 PM
I do think there are some movies that children shouldn't be exposed to before they are ready...

Who's up to take the kiddies to go see Deliverance?



:lol:

Metal Panda
01-28-2007, 06:05 PM
Who's up to take the kiddies to go see Deliverance?



:lol:

haha.

Roman529
01-28-2007, 08:08 PM
Why don't people just mind their own buisness and let parents raise their kids. It may not be ethically sound to take a kid to a rated-R movie, but there are many things in life which are just as damaging.

There is a rating, NC-17, which no one under the age of 17 is admitted. If the industry feels the need to lower the standards by which the rating is to apply, then so be it.

:yeahthat:

dolphan117
01-28-2007, 11:03 PM
There have definitely been times that I have seen young kids and sometimes even babies (who start crying) in movies that I didn't think were appropriate for their age group........ That being said this is pretty stupid. Putting some new kind of warning label on movies isn't going to all of a sudden going to make parents stop taking their young kids to see R rated movies. The problem is the parents, not the lack of a warning label.

FinsNCanes
01-29-2007, 01:05 AM
I'm really afraid to see what society is going to be like in 20 years. We'll probably get tasered for holding hands with our wives in public because kids might not know why we would be.

dolphan117
01-29-2007, 01:20 PM
A note from Peter Kings MMQB


10. I think these are my non-football thoughts of the week:
a. Finally saw The Departed. I know it's a great story with great acting. But the gratuitous gruesomeness went waaaaaay overboard and ruined the movie for me. How many people getting shot in the head with the blood spraying out everywhere do we have to see in order for Martin Scorsese to make his point that mob violence can be pretty horrible? And are there any state troopers still alive in Massachusetts? After watching this killathon, you'd think they'd all be dead. Two-thirds of the way through the movie, I couldn't wait for it to end.
b. The only thing worse than the stomachache I had leaving the theater was the revulsion I felt seeing eight or 10 children walk out after the movie with their parents or guardians. One 2- or 3-year-old was being carried in a woman's arms. With parents like those, God have mercy on those children and how they will grow up viewing the world.http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/peter_king/01/28/mmqb/5.html

dolphan117
01-29-2007, 01:22 PM
I'm really afraid to see what society is going to be like in 20 years. We'll probably get tasered for holding hands with our wives in public because kids might not know why we would be.Um, I think if you look at the present VS. what things were like 20 years ago we are very much moving in the other direction. :wink:

DrAstroZoom
01-29-2007, 01:29 PM
As long as the kids don't yap during the movie, I'm fine with it.

Pennington's Rocket Arm
01-29-2007, 01:34 PM
A note from Peter Kings MMQB
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/peter_king/01/28/mmqb/5.html
hey it's great to hear from the 50's again.