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Buffalo Sucks
02-12-2007, 01:53 PM
Courtesy SI's Peter King:

The Franchise Player Tag. By slapping the franchise tag on a player, a team agrees to pay the player the average of the top five players at that position, or a 20 percent raise over his 2006 salary, whichever is greater. Usually the average of the top five is greater. If another team makes a franchise player an offer, the original team can match the offer and keep the player, or it can let the player go and take two first-round picks as compensation, or (and this is what usually takes place if a team wants to dangle a player in the trade market) the team can negotiate with a team trying to acquire the franchise player by accepting fewer than two first-round picks.

The Transition Player Tag. When a team designates a transition player, the team designates his salary at an average of the top 10 players at his position, or a 20 percent raise over his 2006 salary, whichever is greater. If another team makes a transition player an offer, the original team can match the offer and keep the player or surrender the player for a draft pick or picks.

Last season, a surprisingly low four players got one of the two tags ... a number sure to be surpassed this year. Three players -- John Abraham of the Jets, Jeff Backus of Detroit and Nate Clements of Buffalo -- were designated with the franchise tag; Backus and Clements signed with their teams for 2006, but Abraham was traded to Atlanta. The fourth player, Seattle guard Steve Hutchinson, was declared a transition player, which led to Minnesota signing him and Seattle choosing not to match the offer.

Teams have until Feb. 22 to designate franchise or transition players. Free-agency begins March 2. I think there will be a big influx of tags on players, because teams have an average of $18 million to spend in the free-agent and draft-pick market entering this off-season. So Indianapolis, for example, is not going to allow Dwight Freeney, a looming free-agent, to see the open market because he'd be snapped up in a second.

It'll be interesting to see, though, if a team out there with a low first-round pick and significant cap money (the Saints, picking 27th in the first round, have about $21 million in cap room) chooses to pursue a franchised player or one given a transition tag, and attempts to work out a trade for him.

The numbers per position:
Franchise vs. Transition

Position Franchise Number Transition Number

Quarterback $12.615 million $10.182 million
Running back $6.999 million $5.981 million
Wide receiver $7.613 million $3.612 million
Tight end $4.371 million $3.612 million
Offensive line $9.556 million $8.267 million
Defensive end $8.644 million $7.701 million
Defensive tackle $6.775 million $5.554 million
Linebacker $7.206 million $6.493 million
Cornerback $7.790 million $6.766 million
Safety $4.490 million $3.984 million
Kicker/Punter $2.078 million $1.926 million

spydertl79
02-12-2007, 10:13 PM
I will never understand why New England didn't tag Vinatieri last offseason.

Smoke
02-12-2007, 11:22 PM
I will never understand why New England didn't tag Vinatieri last offseason.

It worked out for them. That rookie Gostkowski had a solid season for them and looks promising.

playmaker1
02-13-2007, 02:58 AM
It worked out for them. That rookie Gostkowski had a solid season for them and looks promising.

worked out? you mean while NE watched from home while Vinatieri win another ring?

Alex44
02-13-2007, 03:03 AM
worked out? you mean while NE watched from home while Vinatieri win another ring?

You guys are both right.


NE had the cap room they should have tagged him IMO

but

They werent really sitting at home because of their kicker (Although maybe that game is different if the Colts have another kicker, or heck maybe the Colts dont even beat the Ravens)