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View Full Version : Key to a long life -- Fewer calories in your diet and less insulin in the brain



Celtkin
07-20-2007, 03:28 PM
Good, old-fashioned diet and exercise might keep you young by reducing the action of insulin in the brain, researchers reported on Thursday.

They created mutant mice that over-ate, got fat and even had symptoms of diabetes, and yet lived 18 percent longer than normal lab mice. The secret: they lacked a certain key gene that affects insulin, the hormone that regulates glucose.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070719/sc_nm/aging_insulin_dc

But that's not the whole story :)

I read this article this morning and it tied in nicely with a episode of NOVA Now that aired earlier this week. Watch the video, if you please:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/3401/01.html

HansMojo
07-20-2007, 06:30 PM
Cool article.

Now, I'm not a prophet, or the son of a prophet, but I am convinced that science will continue to prove that lifespans can be increased through; a healthful BALANCED plant based diet, excercise, lots of water, not too much but enough sunshine, clean air, low stress, proper rest, healthy relationships, and a positive attitude. Socioeconomic status (enables proper healthcare, healthy living conditions, etc.) is also a factor...which is unfortunate for those who are trapped in poverty and one more reason we should be doing as much as possible to help those in this situation.

Of course, I'm not saying one has to be a vegetarian to live a long life. Okinowans are some of the longest lived people in the world and they eat plenty of animal based foods. But it would be beneficial for meat eaters to incorporate lots of plant based foods in their diet and certainly more than the average American consumes.

ckb2001
07-20-2007, 06:46 PM
Cool article.

Now, I'm not a prophet, or the son of a prophet, but I am convinced that science will continue to prove that lifespans can be increased through; a healthful BALANCED plant based diet, excercise, lots of water, not too much but enough sunshine, clean air, low stress, proper rest, healthy relationships, and a positive attitude. Socioeconomic status (enables proper healthcare, healthy living conditions, etc.) is also a factor...which is unfortunate for those who are trapped in poverty and one more reason we should be doing as much as possible to help those in this situation.

Of course, I'm not saying one has to be a vegetarian to live a long life. Okinowans are some of the longest lived people in the world and they eat plenty of animal based foods. But it would be beneficial for meat eaters to incorporate lots of plant based foods in their diet and certainly more than the average American consumes.

Hey Hans.. nice to see you around again.

Anyway, there seems to be a "genetic" limit to being able to increase human life spans, even given all the right environmental conditions. It's something around 120 years (though some say possibly a few decades more).

So, in order to increase it even further, it will take other technologies, like genetic engineering, regeneration of tissue and organs, or artificial body parts.

Maybe far in the future, we can just transplant an individual's consciousness, but that's still firmly in the realm of science fiction :wink:

Celtkin
07-20-2007, 06:48 PM
I think the future of medicine lies in fixing problems at the genetic or cellular level rather than using medication to control the symptoms as we often do now. The exception is dealing with infections but I will start another thread on that subject when I have more time.

The Confessor
07-20-2007, 06:51 PM
I think the future of medicine lies in fixing problems at the genetic or cellular level rather than using medication to control the symptoms as we often do now. The exception is dealing with infections but I will start another thread on that subject when I have more time.

Oh yeah, and what makes you such an expert:tantrum:


Just kidding my friend:D. Good to see you are already getting a head-start on the long studies ahead of you.:beer1:

Great article BTW Celtkin.

Celtkin
07-20-2007, 06:55 PM
Oh yeah, and what makes you such an expert:tantrum:


Just kidding my friend:D. Good to see you are already getting a head-start on the long studies ahead of you.:beer1:

Great article BTW Celtkin.
I have already completed a Master's degree in molecular biology and microbiology :lol:

cnc66
07-20-2007, 06:58 PM
:phinatic13:

HansMojo
07-20-2007, 07:05 PM
Hey Hans.. nice to see you around again.

Anyway, there seems to be a "genetic" limit to being able to increase human life spans, even given all the right environmental conditions. It's something around 120 years (though some say possibly a few decades more).

So, in order to increase it even further, it will take other technologies, like genetic engineering, regeneration of tissue and organs, or artificial body parts.

Maybe far in the future, we can just transplant an individual's consciousness, but that's still firmly in the realm of science fiction :wink:
Hey Ckb. I think you are going to be proven right about the genetic limit. But I think more people could achieve closer to that limit with healthy lifestyles.

As long as you guys figure out how to transplant my conscious into a giant 40 foot tall robot, I'm all for it. Oh, and I want to be able to tranform into a car.

The Confessor
07-20-2007, 07:06 PM
I have already completed a Master's degree in molecular biology and microbiology :lol:


Yeah well, I disected a frog once...:lol:

Celtkin
07-20-2007, 07:15 PM
Yeah well, I disected a frog once...:lol:
:sidelol:

I love the new avatar, Kenny. :up:

ckb2001
07-20-2007, 07:18 PM
Hey Ckb. I think you are going to be proven right about the genetic limit. But I think more people could achieve closer to that limit with healthy lifestyles.

As long as you guys figure out how to transplant my conscious into a giant 40 foot tall robot, I'm all for it. Oh, and I want to be able to tranform into a car.

You know that Transformers movie got a relatively bad rating, but I just loved those robots :D

And of course what you said about healthy lifestyles is correct.

HansMojo
07-20-2007, 07:32 PM
You know that Transformers movie got a relatively bad rating, but I just loved those robots :D

And of course what you said about healthy lifestyles is correct.
Geek (Yeah, I loved it too). Sure, it was probably developed with 13 year old males in mind, but how can you not like watching giant space robots battle each other in the middle of a city (with the ability to transform into something else no less). What could be better than that with a giant bucket of popcorn?