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View Full Version : I love cats, but I wouldn't want this one near me



Miamian
07-27-2007, 06:39 AM
The feline grim reaper (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070726/ap_on_fe_st/death_cat;_ylt=AmUbM3H9TdeoeY9FLEqWuaHq188F)


Oscar the cat seems to have an uncanny knack for predicting when nursing home patients are going to die, by curling up next to them during their final hours. His accuracy, observed in 25 cases, has led the staff to call family members once he has chosen someone. It usually means they have less than four hours to live.

Pagan
07-27-2007, 07:30 AM
Yikes.

finswin56
07-27-2007, 07:59 AM
Damn Grim Reaper

PhinzN703
07-27-2007, 08:13 AM
I felt the same when I read the article. It has to be nice though for the families to have some closure about their situation and to see the cat giving the patient a little love before they pass on.

If I was aware of what the cat was doing and saw him in my room's doorway I'd try and get up to run away

:unsure:

SCall13
07-27-2007, 08:19 AM
That's kind of freaky.

Mike13
07-27-2007, 11:47 AM
Maybe we should send the Cat to Saban's house?

Alex44
07-27-2007, 11:55 AM
I'd still want him :lol:


I'm getting another kitten today :woot:

TotoreMexico
07-27-2007, 02:34 PM
:foundout:

http://www.finheaven.com/clear.gif

ckb2001
07-27-2007, 02:43 PM
I hope they do find out exactly what the cat is sensing if he's really sensing something. This quote says it all:

QUOTE:
"No one's certain if Oscar's behavior is scientifically significant or points to a cause. Teno wonders if the cat notices telltale scents or reads something into the behavior of the nurses who raised him.

Nicholas Dodman, who directs an animal behavioral clinic at the Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and has read Dosa's article, said the only way to know is to carefully document how Oscar divides his time between the living and dying.

If Oscar really is a furry grim reaper, it's also possible his behavior could be driven by self-centered pleasures like a heated blanket placed on a dying person, Dodman said."
------------

Puka-head
07-27-2007, 05:15 PM
I hope they do find out exactly what the cat is sensing if he's really sensing something. This quote says it all:

QUOTE:
"No one's certain if Oscar's behavior is scientifically significant or points to a cause. Teno wonders if the cat notices telltale scents or reads something into the behavior of the nurses who raised him.

Nicholas Dodman, who directs an animal behavioral clinic at the Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and has read Dosa's article, said the only way to know is to carefully document how Oscar divides his time between the living and dying.

If Oscar really is a furry grim reaper, it's also possible his behavior could be driven by self-centered pleasures like a heated blanket placed on a dying person, Dodman said."
------------
Animal have senses that humans don't, I think they are able to communicate on a much more primitive spiritual nature than humans. There is lots of research with dogs being able to detect cancer by smelling, and dolphins have been able to use there ultrasound to diagnose pregnancy's and malignant tumors in patients.
I believe that humans lost there "contact" with the earth and the spirits of all living things when tools became more important, and animals still have that sense.

ckb2001
07-27-2007, 06:15 PM
Animal have senses that humans don't, I think they are able to communicate on a much more primitive spiritual nature than humans. There is lots of research with dogs being able to detect cancer by smelling, and dolphins have been able to use there ultrasound to diagnose pregnancy's and malignant tumors in patients.
I believe that humans lost there "contact" with the earth and the spirits of all living things when tools became more important, and animals still have that sense.

That bolded statement is too spiritual for me. You're right about animals having other senses. Humans have something like 10 only. And we don't have stuff like echolocation, infra-red vision (some snakes have that - it's not really "vision" either), detecting electric currents (many marine animals use that to find stuff under sand), etc..

But, otherwise (so other than senses we don't have), it's just a matter of how sensitive the sensory apparatus is and how reliant we are on it, nothing else and nothing spiritual. Most animals use the sense of smell (detecting odorants) as their primary method of understanding the world around them. So, rats or dogs detecting things we can't has nothing to do with humans losing ability we had before we used tools, it just has to do with those animals having greater sensitivity to that kind of stimuli.

Where humans are generally good is with vision. Regardless of how more "in touch" with nature this cat in the article seems, it will never have vision comparable to what humans have. We can detect things it simply can't detect (at given distances, etc..) because of the design of our eyes.

Oh, and even with chemoreceptors, we can outdo the cat in some ways. Cats can't sense "sweetness" for example.

So, our senses are perfectly "in touch" with nature. We just use them to understand the world we've created more than the world that existed before man started altering it with technology.

Mike13
07-27-2007, 06:17 PM
I hope they do find out exactly what the cat is sensing if he's really sensing something

It is intresting thats for sure, My Grandparent's doberman dug her own grave as she was dying(or so I'm told)

Puka-head
07-27-2007, 06:59 PM
That bolded statement is too spiritual for me. You're right about animals having other senses. Humans have something like 10 only. And we don't have stuff like echolocation, infra-red vision (some snakes have that - it's not really "vision" either), detecting electric currents (many marine animals use that to find stuff under sand), etc..

But, otherwise (so other than senses we don't have), it's just a matter of how sensitive the sensory apparatus is and how reliant we are on it, nothing else and nothing spiritual. Most animals use the sense of smell (detecting odorants) as their primary method of understanding the world around them. So, rats or dogs detecting things we can't has nothing to do with humans losing ability we had before we used tools, it just has to do with those animals having greater sensitivity to that kind of stimuli.

Where humans are generally good is with vision. Regardless of how more "in touch" with nature this cat in the article seems, it will never have vision comparable to what humans have. We can detect things it simply can't detect (at given distances, etc..) because of the design of our eyes.

Oh, and even with chemoreceptors, we can outdo the cat in some ways. Cats can't sense "sweetness" for example.

So, our senses are perfectly "in touch" with nature. We just use them to understand the world we've created more than the world that existed before man started altering it with technology.
My Native American heritage popping up there :wink:

What I'm refering to is more how birds are able to migrate, lost pets find their way home from miles away in strange places, I spent two summers tracking tuna in Hawaii, they could find geographical structure and manmade ones with accuracy equaling GPS. That kind of thing, animals seem to be more "aware" of things on an instinctual level than we are, and I don't think that was always the case.

tylerdolphin
07-27-2007, 08:00 PM
A seagull returns to the place it grew up every year until it dies. Down here in the Bahamas Ive know of people to raise seagull chicks and have them come back to a specific house for 10-20 years. How do they know where to fly? Like puka-Head said, its like some animas have a special instinct we dont have.

ckb2001
07-27-2007, 08:01 PM
My Native American heritage popping up there :wink:

What I'm refering to is more how birds are able to migrate, lost pets find their way home from miles away in strange places, I spent two summers tracking tuna in Hawaii, they could find geographical structure and manmade ones with accuracy equaling GPS. That kind of thing, animals seem to be more "aware" of things on an instinctual level than we are, and I don't think that was always the case.

Oh, I see. Well, humans never had such "instincts" either if that's what you mean. Our "awareness" of Nature comes from our unequalled ability to learn and find associations among things we experience.

Even without advanced tools (or any tools for navigation), Polynesian islanders could look at vast stretches of "featureless" ocean and find their from island to island. And bedouins can navigate "featureless" deserts too.

But, humans aren't born with such navigational tools. No, instead we have become so powerful because of our ability to learn associations among things we experience and change our behavior and strategy accordingly. We do this better than any other organism out there. And we're born with a brain that allows us to learn such things.

For example, even a human infant can outperform most other animals in truly simple tasks, from recognizing itself in pictures or a mirror to something as stupidly simple as counting past say the number 4. Most birds can't count past 4 (you can find that out by having several humans go into a building with all but one coming out shortly afterwards. Then you see if the bird remembers there is still one in the building/shack). And how many animals can you deceive with the exact same trick over and over again?

So, it's a different kind of ability we're talking about. But, humans haven't "lost" abilities of the kind you're talking about, since those were mostly learned in the past anyway.

ckb2001
07-27-2007, 08:06 PM
A seagull returns to the place it grew up every year until it dies. Down here in the Bahamas Ive know of people to raise seagull chicks and have them come back to a specific house for 10-20 years. How do they know where to fly? Like puka-Head said, its like some animas have a special instinct we dont have.

It just boils down to an animal having the ability to sense something we have difficulty sensing and being preprogrammed to behave in a certain way. It does seem impressive, but keep in mind all the things humans can do they can't, especially mental abilities. I'd argue we're far more impressive than they are. That doesn't mean we can do everything they can do. Why should we? We evolved in a different environment than they did, so we need different abilities than they do.

Scatman
07-29-2007, 04:36 PM
man kill that thing will tya