PDA

View Full Version : Dell - Are they any better today? Need advice on computers.



FinsNCanes
04-14-2008, 01:07 AM
So..I've never been a huge fan of these mass producing computer places. I understand it's probably the cheaper route parting stuff out seperarely and having someone build it and what not but I don't really have 1300 to just drop on the spot (however much it would be) so I'm looking for something I can have payments and try to pay off earlier. I guess my question would be does anyone here have one and/or have an opinion on how they are today? My friend has one and his seems to work perfectly. I've just always been kind of irked by Dell..no real reason though. I assume all the parts are the same as you would get anywhere else. I've been out of the loop for a long time so HELP ME..please :wink:

CitizenSnips
04-14-2008, 01:25 AM
Ahem...ok

Im a sophmore in college, and My mom bought me a Dell XPS for a high school graduation gift. It didn't make it through my freshman year. I'm not really sure what happened, only that one day it randomly turned off and from that point on it would only work for about 10-15 minutes and then it would continually shut off. Then it got to the point where it wouldnt even turn on at all. I spent hours on the phone with customer service from Dell, and they did not help me at all. In fact they sold me a new power supply, which i got, switched with the one in the computer, and the same thing still occurred. So they roped me into buying another $50 part i didn't need. And of course, this happened about 3 weeks after my warranty ran out. So they wouldn't send anyone out to fix it for me either.

This is a horror story of mine that will keep me away from anything Dell forever. Not only did there product break, they even screwed me into buying another piece of crap along with it. I had to buy a new laptop mid-semester. I bought an HP and its been good to me ever since.

CitizenSnips
04-14-2008, 01:37 AM
So i looked up some potential causes, apparently im not alone. You know how the 360 has the 3 red lights of death?

Well apparently a Dell has the Orange light of death. To see several other horror stories like mine, type in "Dell Orange Light" into google and you'll see several links to other people who have had the same problem. Apparently the orange light can mean several things. Either a component in the computer has stopped working or it was installed incorrectly. So Dell sold me a power supply, when it could have been several other things as well, such as the hard drive or the motherboard.

Go Dell.... (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Dell+orange+light&btnG=Google+Search)

PaPhinz
04-14-2008, 06:04 AM
I normally build my own PC's but judging from your post you would not be comfortable doing that but at work when we order a new server we use Tiger Direct. You can usually find really good deals on that site for PC's and parts. If you ever want to build a PC it's actually a lot easier than people think and it will save you some money. When I built my current PC it was as good if not better than what DELL and HP were offering and it cost me about $450-500. Here is the site where you can configure your own, hope this helps:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/category/category_slc.asp?CatId=1307

Another site to check out as well is. http://www.newegg.com

Phin-o-rama
04-14-2008, 08:38 AM
Dell's are great. I have bought many for people in our company, including laptops, desktops and monitors.

Their customer service is great. I would splurge a little on the warranty if you are worried (you get 1 year automatically).

For example, one of our guys complained to me about his laptop battery not holding a charge very well. I called Dell and he still had 3 months left on warranty, so they overnighted a new battery for free, and it was very painless.

Building your own pc will be cheaper, and better. You would know all the parts and pieces inside your machine which will be helpful to you in learning about them and whatnot.

as far as tigerdirect.com goes...they are great, just be weary of items that have an MIR (mail in rebate) as they are somewhat shady on following through.

newegg.com > all

FinsNCanes
04-14-2008, 11:04 AM
Thanks for the replies. I was doing a little research last night on how to build PC's and it does seem pretty easy. There is a site I found that actually has video on how to put together each part like video card, ram, etc. You think 1000 bucks (if I built my own) could get me something mid-high level (it's mainly for gaming). I know video cards are pretty expensive though and depending on what ram you get can be a huge jump. What is the "it" ram nowadays? I remember when I got my computer DDR was the thing and my roommate just got DDR2 or something for like 25 bucks per gig which seems awfully cheap to me. I was reading though if I'm going to splurge to splurge more so on the motherboard for future upgrades.

Dolphin1184
04-14-2008, 11:29 AM
Thanks for the replies. I was doing a little research last night on how to build PC's and it does seem pretty easy. There is a site I found that actually has video on how to put together each part like video card, ram, etc. You think 1000 bucks (if I built my own) could get me something mid-high level (it's mainly for gaming). I know video cards are pretty expensive though and depending on what ram you get can be a huge jump. What is the "it" ram nowadays? I remember when I got my computer DDR was the thing and my roommate just got DDR2 or something for like 25 bucks per gig which seems awfully cheap to me. I was reading though if I'm going to splurge to splurge more so on the motherboard for future upgrades.

I believe Corsair RAM is pretty big.

I have a Gateway with a Quadcore Q6600, 4GB RAM 500gig hard drive, and Nvidia Geforce 8500. I know the video card is my comp's Achilles heal, but after getting the XBOX 360, I doubt I will be upgrading my video card and power source any time soon.:(

PaPhinz
04-14-2008, 02:12 PM
If you're looking for a gaming PC and you feel pretty confident I would definitely suggest building, what you save in most parts can be put towards a higher end graphics card. The only thing really to worry about when building one is double grounding the motherboard and frying it. Like someone else said it's nice to know all of the parts inside your PC. As far as RAM I tend to go with Crucial unless I find a really good deal on something else. If you do decide to go the building your own route and are going to be running stuff that requires a lot of PC use it's definitely worth it to find a case that will support multiple fans to keep it cool. The case I got has 3 fans on the case and then one on the processor.

Phin-o-rama
04-14-2008, 03:04 PM
RAM is a place you want to save money....its so cheap nowadays....once you figure out the type you need, don't be afraid to buy offbrands like GEIL and PATRIOT... (well as a dolphin fan you might not want to buy patriot : P )

but yeah, most all ram is the same chips....dont get caught up spending too much for the cool looking ram with the neat casing or LED lighting...

NewEra8
04-15-2008, 06:59 PM
Just recently bought an extremely basic almost barebone XPS1730 as a desktop replacement and upgraded everything myself (4gb RAM, Core 2 Extreme CPU, Dual 8800GTX GPU, plus a few other things) and saved somewhere between 800-1000 bucks buying parts from random places where I found them cheapest.... could go that route.

If youre strapped for cash, you could always do this and then slowly build it and upgrade it as you get the money...

DOLBET
04-15-2008, 07:36 PM
Good site for looking up reviews of computer parts and so on is www.tomshardware.com .

You can buy video card 3850 256 ram for only 130 dollars and it will do for games. If you plan to play new and current games , buy 3850 with 512 ram and it will cost you about 180 to 190 dollars. I have 3850 with 512 ram and I can play Farcry with no lagging.

The most important part in the computer will be power supply... Most "novice" builders buy cheap power supply and complains when their computer broke down within a year. A power supply feeds the computer parts electricity and a cheap ones do it unsteady with some power peaks and lags that damages the parts. The good power supply feeds the computer parts steadly. The forums in tomshardware lists the best power supplies.

I spend about 900 dollars building my computer and it can run everything I throw at it. The most expensive part in my computer is the power supply.

ricky williams
04-18-2008, 09:11 PM
Thanks for the replies. I was doing a little research last night on how to build PC's and it does seem pretty easy. There is a site I found that actually has video on how to put together each part like video card, ram, etc. You think 1000 bucks (if I built my own) could get me something mid-high level (it's mainly for gaming). I know video cards are pretty expensive though and depending on what ram you get can be a huge jump. What is the "it" ram nowadays? I remember when I got my computer DDR was the thing and my roommate just got DDR2 or something for like 25 bucks per gig which seems awfully cheap to me. I was reading though if I'm going to splurge to splurge more so on the motherboard for future upgrades.

putting together computers is pretty easy. i know next to nothing about computers and i was able to accomplish it. i'm also as dumb as dirt w/ little to no patience. all you need is a tiny screwdriver and a static guard.

i know some components work bettter together so i would do some research online and see some builds that work. if your not in a hurry you can wait out bargains online. sites like newegg and slickdeals have deal of the day or something similar. you can definitely get a pretty decent computer for the price you are talking about.

Stoobz
04-18-2008, 10:44 PM
We have HUNDREDS of Dells at work that work 24/7 with very few problems that aren't caused by stupid users.

I've had a Dell for years and would buy again if I can't build what I want to my satisfaction.

Dell did have a period of time where they bought *cheap* motherboards to go with their cheap line of computers - it didn't work out and they are now back to mostly quality components.

If you don't want to go through the build your own process, buy a mid priced Dell, but be sure you get a decent MB and video card. Everything else you can expand cheaper than what Dell offers.