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View Full Version : Caleb Campbell - controversy ?



PMZQ
04-28-2008, 05:35 PM
I guess we all know now that Campbell from West Point, was drafted at 218 (I think).

As an Army grad he is supposed to be committed to 5 years of service to our country as an officer in the Army. There was every chance he would serve overseas and specifically in harms way in Iraq & Afganistan. However the Army has said they may make an exception for Campbell, and allow him to serve only as a recruiter and keep him safe stateside.

How would you feel if your son or daughter was graduating from West Point, and was deployed, while this guy was kept stateside ? Why should he get preferential treatment ?

I'm really torn on this one.....but lean towards not letting him out of his service. He signed his letter of intent to serve as a real officer, not as a recruiter, which is usually done by an NCO in his later years (I think) or by reserve officers, not full timers. His education was paid for by my taxes, and he will be making a pile, as an NFL player. Should he be required to pay back the worth of his education if he does in fact not serve ?

Jal
04-28-2008, 06:21 PM
I guess we all know now that Campbell from West Point, was drafted at 218 (I think).

As an Army grad he is supposed to be committed to 5 years of service to our country as an officer in the Army. There was every chance he would serve overseas and specifically in harms way in Iraq & Afganistan. However the Army has said they may make an exception for Campbell, and allow him to serve only as a recruiter and keep him safe stateside.

How would you feel if your son or daughter was graduating from West Point, and was deployed, while this guy was kept stateside ? Why should he get preferential treatment ?

I'm really torn on this one.....but lean towards not letting him out of his service. He signed his letter of intent to serve as a real officer, not as a recruiter, which is usually done by an NCO in his later years (I think) or by reserve officers, not full timers. His education was paid for by my taxes, and he will be making a pile, as an NFL player. Should he be required to pay back the worth of his education if he does in fact not serve ?

As a brother of an NCO serving in Iraq (currently involved with the mess in Sadr City for about the past month) I would strongly object since there are thousands of troops who put their lives on the line, whose lives are no more or less valuable than his. The fact that the Army would consider making an exception for him to keep him stateside would send a terrible message to the deployed troops that their lives are worth less than this guys just because he has an NFL contract.

He knew what he was signing up for, so I would expect him to fulfill his obligation. My brother re-enlisted prior to his current deployment, but he never once talked about wanting out because he knew that this was a possibility before re-enlisting. If he wants out, I say make him reimburse the Army and give him a dishonorable discharge.

Just my $0.02

CANDolphan
04-28-2008, 06:28 PM
It's almost the same sort of idea with that American Idol guy who was allowed to stay over here because he was bringing positive press.

If anything, I think it's a good thing. The services need all the positive press they can get right now, and Caleb Campbell does everything right. He deserves to stay stateside and show kids that you CAN be in the NFL if you go to Army/Navy/Air Force. If will not only attract recruits to those schools that are on the fence but it'll bring their type of sacrifice to a whole new light.

Myles Fynch
04-28-2008, 07:02 PM
I guess we all know now that Campbell from West Point, was drafted at 218 (I think).

As an Army grad he is supposed to be committed to 5 years of service to our country as an officer in the Army. There was every chance he would serve overseas and specifically in harms way in Iraq & Afganistan. However the Army has said they may make an exception for Campbell, and allow him to serve only as a recruiter and keep him safe stateside.

How would you feel if your son or daughter was graduating from West Point, and was deployed, while this guy was kept stateside ? Why should he get preferential treatment ?

I'm really torn on this one.....but lean towards not letting him out of his service. He signed his letter of intent to serve as a real officer, not as a recruiter, which is usually done by an NCO in his later years (I think) or by reserve officers, not full timers. His education was paid for by my taxes, and he will be making a pile, as an NFL player. Should he be required to pay back the worth of his education if he does in fact not serve ?

Sounds like a knee-jerk reaction to the Pat Tillman tragedy. [Not on your part, PMZQ]

fldvldog
04-28-2008, 07:05 PM
I don't have a problem with it...I believe he will be a mentor and role model to all service members around the world. He will also be a good character representative that could open the door for more military athletes. Also, Officers do have recruiting duty in the military.

fishypete
04-28-2008, 08:02 PM
The're many ways to serve your country. This isn't an exception just for Campbell...it's available to any servces player that gets drafted...and lets remember just because he gets drafted doesn't mean his obligation is done...if he doesn't stick with the Lions...he still has to fulfill his obligation to the country.

tucker
04-28-2008, 08:39 PM
well, you should have been a good football player then....

Lazy1
04-28-2008, 09:01 PM
I dont have any problem with this, look at how many commercials and advertisements the government spends in recruitment for the army and navy. This guy is a walking and talking advertisement for the army. He will represent the army in a good way and if you watched the draft on sunday he got the whole place chanting usa and made everyone at home root for him and root for the army, that is exactly what they wanted when they made this rule, show the services in a good light.

Stoobz
04-28-2008, 09:27 PM
Much ado about nothing. The rule was in place beforehand and who says he would have gone to Afghanistan or Iraq anyhow?

When you are in the military, you are government property and will be used as they see fit.

Always has been, always will be.

From a USN veteran.

PJack
04-28-2008, 09:49 PM
I heard the Army is the only branch of the Military that allows this. Navy and Air Force do not have this in place. In exchange for allowing Campbell to play in the NFL, he is allowed to finish his military term as a recruiter. I guess Army thinks this type of thing will help draw people to join our already overworked, tired Army troops that have served beyond their normal tours.

FINSItalia
04-28-2008, 10:07 PM
As a former grad I have no problem with this policy. I fully believe if they told him he had to deploy tomorrow he would do so selflessly like every other cadet. But why take away an opportunity of a lifetime from him just because, well I can't think of a reason why someone wouldn't want to see him play Sundays other than jealousy. He'll motivate other grads that are deployed and help recruiting to the Army as well as the West Point football program.

And I believe they fashioned the policy after what USNA did with David Robinson many years ago.

Vaark
04-28-2008, 11:19 PM
I think this policy will be responsible for increased enrollment of high caliber student athletes in service academies who would otherwise accept scholarships elsewhere and whenever afterwards as valued service men and women.... ...(and make the Army Navy game more competitively interesting).

The Juggernaut
04-28-2008, 11:29 PM
I think the rule is right. It's not like playing in the NFL is an ordinary job, you have a very small window to capitalize on that ability and make it in the league, if Caleb was to spend his 5 years then try for the NFL it would be too late. Whereas for every other career he would still be considered young.

hemidemon
04-28-2008, 11:46 PM
I don't see a problem with it. Not all military personnel end up in Iraq. As long as he does his part it's ok.

dlockz
04-28-2008, 11:54 PM
As a military vet and current reservist I have no problem with it. At least its a rule for all and not something Daddy pulled out of his azz. What was done for George Bush and many like him was bull but this is a fair rule that is out in the open. This is good press for Army in the long run.

dabeastdabone
04-29-2008, 12:08 AM
As a former member of the armed forces I have no problem with him serving his country in that form. Matter of fact he will be more use being he is a high profile person in a recruiting aspect than in the field, anyway.

Besides, there are literally thousands of jobs performed in the services and not all are on the ground in harms way. Every job is important.

Farmer
04-29-2008, 08:20 AM
so....he's doing the exact opposite that Pat Tillman did...??