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View Full Version : German Doctor Accidentaly Cures AIDS In Leukemia Patient..



tucker
11-10-2008, 11:04 PM
A Doctor, a Mutation and a Potential Cure for AIDS - WSJ.com (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122602394113507555.html)

http://www.finheaven.com/images/imported/2008/11/NAAT825_CURE_NS_20081106180821-1.gif


The startling case of an AIDS patient who underwent a bone marrow transplant to treat leukemia is stirring new hope that gene-therapy strategies on the far edges of AIDS research might someday cure the disease.
The patient, a 42-year-old American living in Berlin, is still recovering from his leukemia therapy, but he appears to have won his battle with AIDS. Doctors have not been able to detect the virus in his blood for more than 600 days, despite his having ceased all conventional AIDS medication. Normally when a patient stops taking AIDS drugs, the virus stampedes through the body within weeks, or days.

"I was very surprised," said the doctor, Gero Hütter.
The breakthrough appears to be that Dr. Hütter, a soft-spoken hematologist who isn't an AIDS specialist, deliberately replaced the patient's bone marrow cells with those from a donor who has a naturally occurring genetic mutation that renders his cells immune to almost all strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS

this is very cool news..i've heard of bone marrow transplants through stem cells in the past..glad it may be picking up more steam

Miamian
11-11-2008, 02:38 AM
Sometimes that's how it happens.

ברוך יי

LouPhinFan
11-11-2008, 08:09 AM
I'm a firm believer that a cure for almost any disease can be found in our genetic code. Whether its mutation or therapy, once our genetic code is more fully understood, most diseases won't stand a chance.

RaboGrande24
11-17-2008, 11:46 PM
YOu right but im a believer of conspiracies so i KNOW the government already knows this theyre just not letting us know

SpurzN703
11-18-2008, 12:09 AM
Sounds like good news to me. I hope they can find out how exactly this happened and develop a cure that can help millions

Miamian
11-18-2008, 03:50 AM
Of course the alternative is out of the question, but what are the consequences of not having CCR5?

ch19079
11-18-2008, 04:55 PM
I didnt know that some people were basically immune to HIV. The article makes it sound like common knowledge. :(

If that is the case, you would think that most, if not all AIDS research would be focused around these people, to determine exactly why.

So if they are spending millions (im sure someone is looking into it) on a cure for HIV/AIDS, then why is it found by mistake in a leukemia patient?

tucker
11-18-2008, 05:01 PM
actually this practice has been around for a few years, the title is more to grab your attention

edit: and what happened to ckb2001

Tetragrammaton
11-21-2008, 10:04 AM
I didnt know that some people were basically immune to HIV. The article makes it sound like common knowledge. :(

If that is the case, you would think that most, if not all AIDS research would be focused around these people, to determine exactly why.

So if they are spending millions (im sure someone is looking into it) on a cure for HIV/AIDS, then why is it found by mistake in a leukemia patient?

No research is necessary. You have to have certain receptor sites on your cells to catch a disease. It isn't just HIV, it applies to just about every disease.

We all knew that kid that didn't get chicken pox. It is the same thing.

It isn't common knowledge, though. I learned it in an Anatomy class. Science articles have a way of talking above people.

ih8brady
11-23-2008, 02:20 AM
No research is necessary. You have to have certain receptor sites on your cells to catch a disease. It isn't just HIV, it applies to just about every disease.

We all knew that kid that didn't get chicken pox. It is the same thing.

It isn't common knowledge, though. I learned it in an Anatomy class. Science articles have a way of talking above people.


I smell elitism. Anybody who tries to smarten up needs to be put down! Let's burn down the CDC and build a new leeching center.