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View Full Version : Advice for a trip to Paris?



Tetragrammaton
02-19-2009, 08:11 PM
I am about to go to France in two weeks. I know some of the touristy places to go to, like the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, and Versailles. But what else should I see? I am spending two weeks there.

CedarPhin
02-19-2009, 08:24 PM
I'd have gone to Italy instead, but that's me.

SpaceMountain16
02-19-2009, 08:27 PM
Storm the Bastille!

Tetragrammaton
02-20-2009, 11:22 AM
Storm the Bastille!

I forgot about the Bastille. But now I read that it is demolished.

No one has any ideas? The most visited country in the world?

fishfanfromjerz
02-20-2009, 11:27 AM
I am about to go to France in two weeks.


my question is ...... WHY??

CedarPhin
02-20-2009, 03:05 PM
I've never had any real desire to go to France. I don't like the French that much though...so that may be it.

ryanosaur2000
02-20-2009, 04:46 PM
I am about to go to France in two weeks. I know some of the touristy places to go to, like the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, and Versailles. But what else should I see? I am spending two weeks there.

Ok, some advice from a none American who has been to France many times on rugby tours. France is a great place to visit. Paris is one of the truly beautiful cities in the world..and one with a lot of history. It is however a little bit pricey. Musts in Paris; top level of the Eiffel tower, it has a fantastic panoramic view and is not overly expensive. You have to check out Notre Dame cathedral, it is truly magnificent and is in many ways the heart of Paris. A tour along the Seine river is another must do, it is a very informative tour and again not overly pricey.

Outside of Paris you should try to go to to the Bordeaux area of France. Beautiful countryside and great for cheap (but good) wine ;-).

One vital piece of advice. Try to use as much French as possible. The French are a proud people (rightfully so) and will want you to make an effort in language. However, if you make an attempt you will find them welcoming and accomodating.

Bon voyage mon ami.

Nublar7
02-20-2009, 09:57 PM
I am about to go to France in two weeks. I know some of the touristy places to go to, like the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, and Versailles. But what else should I see? I am spending two weeks there.
In 2007 I went to Spain, Italy, Sicily and France. While I was in France for a few days, I only did one day in the city of Paris. It was a tour that we took that took us around and showed us the main sites of Paris. Of course we went to the Eiffel Tower, we drove by the Louvre and we also went to Notre Dame. Though we didn't spend long at Notre Dame and I wish we would have. That was a pretty cool place. We also did a cruise down the Seine river(which I will tell you is a pretty dirty river with homeless people under every bridge).

I am not sure how much traveling you are during in France, but another big famous place to visit is Marseille where you can go to the Monte Carlo. We went there and you wouldn't believe how many expensive cars were parked outside. One place I wish I would have got to in France but didn't was Normandy.

We also spent a couple of nights at Disneyland Paris, which was fun. One note about France is that in restaurants, they seem not to like putting ice in sodas, water, etc. Not sure why, but it is something I guess we are used to here in the States.

I will say that out of the four countries I went to on that trip, Italy was by far my favorite. You can't beat Italy. We went to Florence, Pisa, Naples, Civitavecchia(we then took the train into Rome and saw the Trevi Fountain, Vatican City and the the colosseum). Seeing Pompei was pretty cool also.

Tetragrammaton
02-20-2009, 10:26 PM
my question is ...... WHY??

Because it is a beautiful country, rich with history? Did you not enjoy it?

Thanks Ryan. I hadn't even heard of the Seine River, but I will be sure to check it out. I don't know how much countryside I am going to be able to see though, because my wife's parents in London are trying to get us come to them for a few days. I will fight this as hard as I can, however.

Thanks Nublar. I want to go to Mersaille, but honestly I don't know if I will be able to. We are going to capitalize on Spring Break so we don't miss much school, but I should have waited until summer, but by that point, my wife is going to be unable to walk. I really wish we could have at least a month.

Buzz Killington
02-20-2009, 10:44 PM
I have been to Paris many times and it is a great city. You will enjoy great food and wine and breath-taking architecture. I agree that Notre Dame is a must see. I have spent hours walking around the Latin Quarter and the area around Notre Dame.

Something off-beat but enjoyable is the tour of the Paris sewer system.

Bumpus
02-21-2009, 03:21 AM
You could always check out the National Surrender Museum.


... or, I hear the they give lovely tours of the white-flag textile mill.

Miamian
02-21-2009, 04:07 PM
Paris is beautiful. I hate Rome.

Anyway, when I was in Paris I decided to go by the numbers. I started at Ile de la Cite, and within about a week I pretty much seen most of the first 8 arrondisements. I added the Eiffel Tower as a divergence.

Unfortunately the Musee D'Orsay was closed when I wanted to see it, a Monday, take note.

One thing about language. I speak French, so it wasn't a problem but I really didn't get the sense of the "ugly American" attitude.

CedarPhin
02-21-2009, 05:56 PM
In 2007 I went to Spain, Italy, Sicily and France. While I was in France for a few days, I only did one day in the city of Paris. It was a tour that we took that took us around and showed us the main sites of Paris. Of course we went to the Eiffel Tower, we drove by the Louvre and we also went to Notre Dame. Though we didn't spend long at Notre Dame and I wish we would have. That was a pretty cool place. We also did a cruise down the Seine river(which I will tell you is a pretty dirty river with homeless people under every bridge).

I am not sure how much traveling you are during in France, but another big famous place to visit is Marseille where you can go to the Monte Carlo. We went there and you wouldn't believe how many expensive cars were parked outside. One place I wish I would have got to in France but didn't was Normandy.

We also spent a couple of nights at Disneyland Paris, which was fun. One note about France is that in restaurants, they seem not to like putting ice in sodas, water, etc. Not sure why, but it is something I guess we are used to here in the States.

I will say that out of the four countries I went to on that trip, Italy was by far my favorite. You can't beat Italy. We went to Florence, Pisa, Naples, Civitavecchia(we then took the train into Rome and saw the Trevi Fountain, Vatican City and the the colosseum). Seeing Pompei was pretty cool also.

Sicily and Tuscany are beautiful places.

Miamian
02-22-2009, 05:43 AM
Something else about Europe in general. A lot of people visit cities and just go from attraction to attraction and that way miss much of what the city has to offer. Paris may be the quintessential example. When you're there take time to walk through the neighborhoods and watch the street theater go by on a sidewalk bench.

Tetragrammaton
02-22-2009, 02:19 PM
Something else about Europe in general. A lot of people visit cities and just go from attraction to attraction and that way miss much of what the city has to offer. Paris may be the quintessential example. When you're there take time to walk through the neighborhoods and watch the street theater go by on a sidewalk bench.

Really? I have heard a bit of the opposite. I have been told that once you start getting out of tourists zones, your lack of French is treated in a much more hostile way. I am just now learning the most basic French phrases, so I don't know how well I would be looked at. My wife's English accent should be able to stop some of the anti-Americanism though.

ryanosaur2000
02-22-2009, 02:46 PM
Really? I have heard a bit of the opposite. I have been told that once you start getting out of tourists zones, your lack of French is treated in a much more hostile way. I am just now learning the most basic French phrases, so I don't know how well I would be looked at. My wife's English accent should be able to stop some of the anti-Americanism though.

The French dislike the English as much (if not more) than they dislike you guys lol. But, all jokes aside, I found that any attempt to speak French will be met with generosity. In my opinion the stereotype of the French being completely arrogant and rude are greatly overplayed. Make light of your bad French and apologise jovially about your mis-pronouciation. And, always keep in mind how you would feel if someone came to the U.S. and only spoke a foreign lanuage and expected you to adapt to him. With those things in mind, you won't have any major issues.

Nublar7
02-22-2009, 02:50 PM
Paris is beautiful. I hate Rome.

Anyway, when I was in Paris I decided to go by the numbers. I started at Ile de la Cite, and within about a week I pretty much seen most of the first 8 arrondisements. I added the Eiffel Tower as a divergence.

Unfortunately the Musee D'Orsay was closed when I wanted to see it, a Monday, take note.

One thing about language. I speak French, so it wasn't a problem but I really didn't get the sense of the "ugly American" attitude.I absolutely loved Rome.

As for the "ugly American attitude", I definitely could sense it. I felt they were much more rude if they knew you were American. A prime example was I was in line for Space Mountain at DisneyLand Paris and these two French guys(in their 20s) were behind us. At one point in the line, they just decided to push ahead of the Americans. Of course being in a foreign country I didn't want to get into anything(especially in a tight line), but I had to really hold myself back from doing anything. I felt they looked down upon us, but we made due.

Miamian
02-22-2009, 06:16 PM
Really? I have heard a bit of the opposite. I have been told that once you start getting out of tourists zones, your lack of French is treated in a much more hostile way. I am just now learning the most basic French phrases, so I don't know how well I would be looked at. My wife's English accent should be able to stop some of the anti-Americanism though.
I think that the effort will be appreciated.

CedarPhin
02-22-2009, 06:22 PM
The only problem I've ever had overseas was when I got harassed by some fake cops in Mexico, and more recently during the Gaza ordeal when I was in Lebanon. Nothing major, and the people are usually friendly, but once that started, I'd never got so many dirty looks in my life.

I've never had any trouble at all at any place in Europe though.