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2xBlown
02-21-2009, 10:33 PM
Hello Dolphin brothers and sisters. I'm flying out from Vancouver to Florida on March 14 for a week. I'll be staying in Marco Island at a friend's place, but will be making trips to Miami, Key West and Disney World.

Its my first time in the Miami area and sadly its not during football season. Nevertheless, I'm going to make a point of dropping by Dolphins Stadium. Perhaps the locals can give me some more ideas on Dolphins related activities or just some cool things to check out.

CedarPhin
02-21-2009, 11:15 PM
Stay at the Clevelander.

Best. Hotel. Ever.

BARF
02-21-2009, 11:58 PM
visit south beach

CedarPhin
02-22-2009, 12:55 AM
Yeah, the Clevelander is right down on South Beach. You can't miss it.

Miamian
02-22-2009, 04:30 AM
South Beach is great, but if you stay there, particularly on Ocean Drive or Washington Avenue and particularly at a hotel like the Clevelander with its all-night packed bar, you won't sleep unless you're the kind that could sleep through a volcanic eruption.

If you need something quieter consider going a bit farther north and maybe along the Intracoastal.

While you're in Miami, there's lots to do. South Beach is more of a people-watching beach. If you want something more, but not completely pristine, try Crandon Park on Key Biscayne. Farther south, you also have Matheson Hammock with a really interesting tropical hardwood hammock in its natural state.

Coconut Grove is also a nice and interesting place to walk around and shop. Another that isn't quite as developed and still had a lot of artists when I was there last is the Art and Design District, known locally as the Design District.

If you want to experience Latin culture, then go to Little Havana, which centers on Calle Ocho (8th Street). You could go to Little Haiti for Haitian culture, although I don't know how developed it is as of now. It was starting to develop but my guess is that it's still pretty gritty.

Museums:
Historical Museum of Southern Florida in Downtown Miami. It's really cool. The architecture of the plaza there is an affront.

Vizcaya Museum and Gardens: What many consider Miami's crown jewel. It was the estate of James Deering who built a tractor-based economic empire. Interesting mansion which reflects his eccentricity and beautiful Italian-style gardens.

Spanish Monastery: In North Miami Beach, it's the oldest building in the United States. It's an actual 12-century monastery from Spain that was disassembled, shipped over to Miami, and then rebuilt.

Parrot Jungle Island: I've only been there when it was more modest and located in the suburbs, it's been developed near Downtown and has parrot shows with parrots doing tricks and has lush gardens.

Freedom Tower: A replica of a tower in Giralda, Spain, it was originally the Miami News tower and served as the central processing center for Cuban refugees after the Revolution. It's been in and out of development.

Brickell Avenue: It's got interesting architecture, but it's essentially a lot of banks on one segment and mostly residential on another. That's where the building with the palm tree from Miami Vice is located.

2xBlown
02-24-2009, 01:10 PM
South Beach is great, but if you stay there, particularly on Ocean Drive or Washington Avenue and particularly at a hotel like the Clevelander with its all-night packed bar, you won't sleep unless you're the kind that could sleep through a volcanic eruption.

If you need something quieter consider going a bit farther north and maybe along the Intracoastal.

While you're in Miami, there's lots to do. South Beach is more of a people-watching beach. If you want something more, but not completely pristine, try Crandon Park on Key Biscayne. Farther south, you also have Matheson Hammock with a really interesting tropical hardwood hammock in its natural state.

Coconut Grove is also a nice and interesting place to walk around and shop. Another that isn't quite as developed and still had a lot of artists when I was there last is the Art and Design District, known locally as the Design District.

If you want to experience Latin culture, then go to Little Havana, which centers on Calle Ocho (8th Street). You could go to Little Haiti for Haitian culture, although I don't know how developed it is as of now. It was starting to develop but my guess is that it's still pretty gritty.

Museums:
Historical Museum of Southern Florida in Downtown Miami. It's really cool. The architecture of the plaza there is an affront.

Vizcaya Museum and Gardens: What many consider Miami's crown jewel. It was the estate of James Deering who built a tractor-based economic empire. Interesting mansion which reflects his eccentricity and beautiful Italian-style gardens.

Spanish Monastery: In North Miami Beach, it's the oldest building in the United States. It's an actual 12-century monastery from Spain that was disassembled, shipped over to Miami, and then rebuilt.

Parrot Jungle Island: I've only been there when it was more modest and located in the suburbs, it's been developed near Downtown and has parrot shows with parrots doing tricks and has lush gardens.

Freedom Tower: A replica of a tower in Giralda, Spain, it was originally the Miami News tower and served as the central processing center for Cuban refugees after the Revolution. It's been in and out of development.

Brickell Avenue: It's got interesting architecture, but it's essentially a lot of banks on one segment and mostly residential on another. That's where the building with the palm tree from Miami Vice is located.


Thats a great list. Thank you very much. I'll make sure to take as much in as I can.