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WeVie
03-07-2010, 10:23 AM
Are You A CarefuL person? Let's see. Below there is a text about writing from wikipedia. Just Read it ALL and Copy-Paste 15th Sentence of the text. That's all (If you can).

Writing, more particularly, refers to two things: writing as a noun, the thing that is written; and writing as a verb, which designates the activity of writing. It refers to the inscription of characters on a medium, thereby forming words, and larger units of language, known as texts. It also refers to the creation of meaning and the information thereby generated. In that regard, linguistics (and related sciences) distinguishes between the written language and the spoken language. The significance of the medium by which meaning and information is conveyed is indicated by the distinction made in the arts and sciences. For example, while public speaking and poetry reading are both types of speech, the former is governed by the rules of rhetoric and the latter by poetics.

A person who composes a message or story in the form of text is generally known as a writer or an author. However, more specific designations exist which are dictated by the particular nature of the text such as that of poet, essayist, novelist, playwright, journalist, and more. A translator is a specialized multilingual writer who must fully understand a message written by somebody else in one language; the translator's job is to produce a document of faithfully equivalent message in a completely different language. A person who transcribes or produces text to deliver a message authored by another person is known as a scribe, typist or typesetter. A person who produces text with emphasis on the aesthetics of glyphs is known as a calligrapher or graphic designer.

Writing is also a distinctly human activity. It has been said that a monkey, randomly typing away on a typewriter (in the days when typewriters replaced the pen or plume as the preferred instrument of writing) could re-create Shakespeare-- but only if it lived long enough (this is known as the infinite monkey theorem). Such writing has been speculatively designated as coincidental. It is also speculated that extraterrestrial beings exist who may possess knowledge of writing. At this point in time, the only confirmed writing in existence is of human origin.

In Western Culture writing is often only considered as the representation of language in a textual medium through the use of a set of signs or symbols (known as a writing system). Writing may use abstract characters that represent phonetic elements of speech, as in Indo-European languages, or it may use simplified representations of objects or concepts, as in east-Asian and ancient Egyptian pictographic writing forms. However, it is distinguished from illustration, such as cave drawing and painting, and non-symbolic preservation of language via non-textual media, such as magnetic tape audio.
Means for recording information

Wells argues that writing has the ability to "put agreements, laws, commandments on record. It made the growth of states larger than the old city states possible. The command of the priest or king and his seal could go far beyond his sight and voice and could survive his death"[3].
Writing systems

The major writing systems methods of inscription broadly fall into four categories: logographic, syllabic, alphabetic, and featural. Another category, ideographic (symbols for ideas), has never been developed sufficiently to represent language. A sixth category, pictographic, is insufficient to represent language on its own, but often forms the core of logographies.
Logographies

A logogram is a written character which represents a word or morpheme. The vast number of logograms needed to write a language, and the many years required to learn them, are the major disadvantage of the logographic systems over alphabetic systems. However, the efficiency of reading logographic writing once it is learned is a major advantage.[4] No writing system is wholly logographic: all have phonetic components as well as logograms ("logosyllabic" components in the case of Chinese characters, cuneiform, and Mayan, where a glyph may stand for a morpheme, a syllable, or both; "logoconsonantal" in the case of hieroglyphs), and many have an ideographic component (Chinese "radicals", hieroglyphic "determiners"). For example, in Mayan, the glyph for "fin", pronounced "ka'", was also used to represent the syllable "ka" whenever the pronunciation of a logogram needed to be indicated, or when there was no logogram. In Chinese, about 90% of characters are compounds of a semantic (meaning) element called a radical with an existing character to indicate the pronunciation, called a phonetic. However, such phonetic elements complement the logographic elements, rather than vice versa.

The main logographic system in use today is Chinese characters, used with some modification for various languages of China, Japanese, and, to a lesser extent, Korean in South Korea. Another is the classical Yi script.
Syllabaries

A syllabary is a set of written symbols that represent (or approximate) syllables. A glyph in a syllabary typically represents a consonant followed by a vowel, or just a vowel alone, though in some scripts more complex syllables (such as consonant-vowel-consonant, or consonant-consonant-vowel) may have dedicated glyphs. Phonetically related syllables are not so indicated in the script. For instance, the syllable "ka" may look nothing like the syllable "ki", nor will syllables with the same vowels be similar.

Actually Syllabaries, or writing have nothing to do with the aim of this thread. This is the Paragraph, that shows if you are careful enough and if you can really read the whole writing. There are many people who don't even read the first sentence of the thread and just go by the title. So, I just wanted make a small trick and see, if people do really read what the thread is about. So if you are reading this paragraph, this means that you are a really careful person who really cares with what others say and mean. If you read this paragraph please don't consider what I said before about the 15th sentence, just write something which has nothing to do with the text or the thread. Let's see who are the ones that are really caring for others.

Syllabaries are best suited to languages with relatively simple syllable structure, such as Japanese. Other languages that use syllabic writing include the Linear B script for Mycenaean Greek; Cherokee; Ndjuka, an English-based creole language of Surinam; and the Vai script of Liberia. Most logographic systems have a strong syllabic component. Ethiopic, though technically an alphabet, has fused consonants and vowels together to the point that it's learned as if it were a syllabary.
Alphabets
See also: History of the alphabet

An alphabet is a small set of symbols, each of which roughly represents or historically represented a phoneme of the language. In a perfectly phonological alphabet, the phonemes and letters would correspond perfectly in two directions: a writer could predict the spelling of a word given its pronunciation, and a speaker could predict the pronunciation of a word given its spelling.

As languages often evolve independently of their writing systems, and writing systems have been borrowed for languages they were not designed for, the degree to which letters of an alphabet correspond to phonemes of a language varies greatly from one language to another and even within a single language.
Abjads

In most of the alphabets of the Mid-East, only consonants are indicated, or vowels may be indicated with optional diacritics. This property originated since the Egyptian times in the hieroglyphs. Such systems are called abjads, derived from the Arabic word for "alphabet".
Abugidas

In most of the alphabets of India and Southeast Asia, vowels are indicated through diacritics or modification of the shape of the consonant. These are called abugidas. Some abugidas, such as Ethiopic and Cree, are learned by children as syllabaries, and so are often called "syllabics". However, unlike true syllabaries, there is not an independent glyph for each syllable.

Sometimes the term "alphabet" is restricted to systems with separate letters for consonants and vowels, such as the Latin alphabet, although abugidas and abjads may also be accepted as alphabets. Because of this use, Greek is often considered to be the first alphabet.
Featural scripts

A featural script notates the building blocks of the phonemes that make up a language. For instance, all sounds pronounced with the lips ("labial" sounds) may have some element in common. In the Latin alphabet, this is accidentally the case with the letters "b" and "p"; however, labial "m" is completely dissimilar, and the similar-looking "q" is not labial. In Korean hangul, however, all four labial consonants are based on the same basic element. However, in practice, Korean is learned by children as an ordinary alphabet, and the featural elements tend to pass unnoticed.

Another featural script is SignWriting, the most popular writing system for many sign languages, where the shapes and movements of the hands and face are represented iconically. Featural scripts are also common in fictional or invented systems, such as Tolkien's Tengwar.

Troysif
03-07-2010, 11:11 AM
It is also speculated that extraterrestrial beings exist who may possess knowledge of writing.

WeVie
03-07-2010, 11:43 AM
It is also speculated that extraterrestrial beings exist who may possess knowledge of writing.

Wong answer. Have a closer look please.

fin-atic
03-07-2010, 11:48 AM
It made the growth of states larger than the old city states possible.

WeVie
03-07-2010, 12:29 PM
It made the growth of states larger than the old city states possible.


Wrong answer

Troysif
03-07-2010, 01:23 PM
At this point in time, the only confirmed writing in existence is of human origin. (Attempt 2)

cowboy82nd
03-13-2010, 11:29 PM
So, what is the right answer?

JCane
03-14-2010, 02:05 AM
So, what is the right answer?

Tim Tebow is one queer son of a ***** and the Florida Gators can go straight **** themselves with an aids infested strap-on cow dildo.

JCane: The pinpoint beacon of light in the vast, dark expanses of stupidity.

:up:

WeVie
03-14-2010, 02:13 AM
So, what is the right answer?


Let's give others a chance to figure it out. Maybe we can trade some answers for some votes for FH MM?

Joe from WY
03-14-2010, 02:13 AM
"At this point in time, the only confirmed writing in existence is of human origin."...lol

WeVie
03-14-2010, 09:19 AM
"At this point in time, the only confirmed writing in existence is of human origin."...lol


You are wrong too friend.

Slim
03-14-2010, 11:40 AM
People seriously can't follow instructions...

The answer is 'Ted Ginn JR sucks at Football.'

Nublar7
03-14-2010, 12:15 PM
"Pigeons and doves are distributed everywhere on Earth, except for the driest areas of the Sahara Desert, Antarctica and its surrounding islands and the high Arctic."

I am counting on your vote WeVie. :up:

WeVie
03-14-2010, 12:23 PM
"Pigeons and doves are distributed everywhere on Earth, except for the driest areas of the Sahara Desert, Antarctica and its surrounding islands and the high Arctic."

I am counting on your vote WeVie. :up:



I too am counting on your vote but, you need to read more carefully.

Nublar7
03-14-2010, 12:29 PM
I too am counting on your vote but, you need to read more carefully.I thought I did. I did "just write something which has nothing to do with the text or the thread".

WeVie
03-14-2010, 01:55 PM
I thought I did. I did "just write something which has nothing to do with the text or the thread".



Don't tell anyone. I wanna save the answer to trade for votes.

phinpunk14
03-14-2010, 11:14 PM
Nothing beats a warm, soft pretzel with melted cheese on it.

WeVie
03-15-2010, 05:03 AM
Nothing beats a warm, soft pretzel with melted cheese on it.


I like those too! :up:

Possum
03-15-2010, 05:06 AM
Don't tell anyone. I wanna save the answer to trade for votes.
have to be careful. cuz if it were someone like me i would start a thread to announce the answer.

Rafiki
03-15-2010, 12:38 PM
Monkeys eat bananas.

arsenal
03-15-2010, 01:11 PM
i dont consider caring reading through long threads... especially when what is being read really isn't relevant to anything...

i once had a teacher give like a getting to know you type test the first day of class... the instructions were to follow the directions, which said read through every question before attempting to answer them... and the last question said do not answer any of the questions... but of course 80% of the class started answering the questions right away including me... im not good at following directions

Bumpus
03-15-2010, 04:31 PM
i dont consider caring reading through long threads... especially when what is being read really isn't relevant to anything...

i once had a teacher give like a getting to know you type test the first day of class... the instructions were to follow the directions, which said read through every question before attempting to answer them... and the last question said do not answer any of the questions... but of course 80% of the class started answering the questions right away including me... im not good at following directions

:lol:
I actually use that one from time to time with my classes ... I call it the "Observation Test"

Full of ridiculous questions, but the last one is "Only answer #7."