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tical
04-15-2011, 07:01 PM
Its on now

Jake locker then ryan mallet

Tunaphish429
04-15-2011, 07:02 PM
Get ready for some major butt kissing..

My guess is Gruden loves them both!!!

tical
04-15-2011, 07:08 PM
Locker is insane taking on tacklers like that as a QB! He wont last long if he keeps that up in the NFL

Tunaphish429
04-15-2011, 07:11 PM
I really love Lockers determination to win.. His accuracey is a problem tho...

tical
04-15-2011, 07:13 PM
I really love Lockers determination to win.. His accuracey is a problem tho...

Yeah im curious about him though...he's one of those guys i dont expect to be successful at the next level..but who knows he may surprise!

tical
04-15-2011, 07:30 PM
Damn did the fans really put Grudens truck on bricks and take the rims? coldddddd!

Tunaphish429
04-15-2011, 07:48 PM
Not very impressed with Mallets speaking....It def worries me a bit.....He talks like a thug...

tical
04-15-2011, 07:53 PM
Not very impressed with Mallets speaking....It def worries me a bit.....He talks like a thug...

Now tuna? lol! He seems to have natural fire to him..but listen to him on the White board, he definitely seems to know what hes talking about.

Roonnette
04-15-2011, 08:02 PM
He is sharp guy, no BS. I like it.

I watched Locker and Dalton, and now Mallett, and he grilled all of them. Gruden QB camp is brutal.

Tunaphish429
04-15-2011, 08:06 PM
Now tuna? lol! He seems to have natural fire to him..but listen to him on the White board, he definitely seems to know what hes talking about.

I agree... His football Iq seemed very high...Locker was the opposite...

TKAllDay
04-15-2011, 08:21 PM
I am ready to take a chance on Mallet

tical
04-15-2011, 08:26 PM
I am ready to take a chance on Mallet

2nd that! lets see,

1) Apparent fire in the belly: Check
2) High FootBall IQ: Check
3) Ability to execute #1 and #2: Check
4) Definitely not a Robot Personality: Check

I'll take the chance

X-Pacolypse
04-15-2011, 09:05 PM
I don't see how anybody could draft Locker in the first three rounds. The guy is horrible.

TKAllDay
04-15-2011, 09:06 PM
I don't see how anybody could draft Locker in the first three rounds. The guy is horrible.
My friend who has a decent football IQ and is a 49ers fan wants them to draft Locker. Locker his fav QB, then Cam, Mallet, Ponder.. LOL

Canadi-Phin
04-15-2011, 09:57 PM
Locker is going to surprise. 2 years from now.

beanh8er
04-15-2011, 10:11 PM
Locker is going to surprise. 2 years from now.
By still being on a roster?

Flip Tanneflop
04-16-2011, 12:08 AM
Jon Gruden is a ****ing douchebag.

rickd13
04-16-2011, 08:57 AM
I was not impressed with Mallett during his segment with Gruden. I get the impression that Gruden wasn't that impressed either. If you look at how enthusiastic Gruden was with Locker as compared to Mallett you will see what I'm talking about. I don't think it is the character issues that bothered Gruden, and character issues are not what bother me. It's the fact that Mallett is so slow and nonathletic that he is going to be a sitting duck in the NFL. He can't improvise at all, so everything around him will have to be perfect for him to be successful. I saw someone on here compare Mallett to Kerry Collins. I think they are right on the money. Mallett has a cannon, but he is going to be so limited because of his lack of athleticism. The closer we get to the draft, the more I'm falling in love with Christian Ponder.

matt11390
04-16-2011, 11:48 AM
I love these shows. Gruden is great with the rookie QB's. You can get a good read on how they carry themselves and their mental toughness ... or softness. Just love these shows.

ckparrothead
04-16-2011, 02:02 PM
I don't know how anyone can watch that whiteboard session with Mallett and also the parts where Gruden pop quizzes him on football concepts...and not just absolutely salivate to get him in your huddle. That whiteboard session and Mallett's ability to talk about football concepts and theory just blows away ALL of the other guys that have done sessions with Gruden this year. You see the way Gruden's face lit up when Mallett got on that whiteboard and he just had to say "God damn there's a lot going on with that play!"

Gruden's a West Coast guy. If he prefers speed with his QBs, that's not exactly surprising. You can get a guy faster. You can work on his tempo and you can use your program to make him a better athlete. But the feet are only going to work as fast as the brain and guys that don't process information on the field as quickly as Mallett can have all the athleticism in the world, they're still going to look slow-footed. Look at Chad Henne. Get him in those Combine-like drills he actually does much better than you'd think. Put him on the field, everything's slow.

I think most people that I've spoken with including yesterday the Burmeister debate we had for NFL Network, plus Greg Cosell, everyone acknowledges this guy Ryan Mallett is 1st round all the way as far as his talent goes. He's a good QB prospect. If you're comfortable with his character issues, it should be a no-brainer...if you have the need at the position which the Dolphins do.

BlueFin
04-16-2011, 02:11 PM
I don't know how anyone can watch that whiteboard session with Mallett and also the parts where Gruden pop quizzes him on football concepts...and not just absolutely salivate to get him in your huddle. That whiteboard session and Mallett's ability to talk about football concepts and theory just blows away ALL of the other guys that have done sessions with Gruden this year. You see the way Gruden's face lit up when Mallett got on that whiteboard and he just had to say "God damn there's a lot going on with that play!"

Gruden's a West Coast guy. If he prefers speed with his QBs, that's not exactly surprising. You can get a guy faster. You can work on his tempo and you can use your program to make him a better athlete. But the feet are only going to work as fast as the brain and guys that don't process information on the field as quickly as Mallett can have all the athleticism in the world, they're still going to look slow-footed. Look at Chad Henne. Get him in those Combine-like drills he actually does much better than you'd think. Put him on the field, everything's slow.

I think most people that I've spoken with including yesterday the Burmeister debate we had for NFL Network, plus Greg Cosell, everyone acknowledges this guy Ryan Mallett is 1st round all the way as far as his talent goes. He's a good QB prospect. If you're comfortable with his character issues, it should be a no-brainer...if you have the need at the position which the Dolphins do.

Exactly CK, he also (Gruden) kept alluding to Dan Marino and the success he had as a Slow QB who moved well in the pocket. I don't know if Mallett moves in the pocket as well as Danny did but the point is taken and I do believe Gruden was impressed by him.

ckparrothead
04-16-2011, 02:14 PM
Gruden had good points for Mallett to take note of...I didn't get the sense that some did that Gruden didn't like Mallett. Because of who Mallett is as a player, he knows he's not a Michael Vick, that sort of thing...he's going to have to know MORE about protections and blitzes and everything than the average QB. That's his challenge, be better with that stuff than anyone else. Don't leave sink calls or fan calls up to your back and right tackle. If you need to be the guy that makes all those calls in order to make sure they're right, so be it...tell your coaches that, and then show that you can do it.

BlueFin
04-16-2011, 02:18 PM
On a related subject, I just heard Mallett came back for a second straight day on Friday, if this is a smokecreen it is a really good one.

ckparrothead
04-16-2011, 02:20 PM
I think he was there Thursday. I certainly didn't see him around the Dolphins' facilities Friday.

BlueFin
04-16-2011, 02:23 PM
I think he was there Thursday. I certainly didn't see him around the Dolphins' facilities Friday.

Just relaying what I heard on 940 winz, they reported just a few minutes ago he came back on Friday for a second straight day?

ckparrothead
04-16-2011, 02:35 PM
Oh really? Dang I wish I'd gotten a chance to see him. Given what I was there for, it would have been serendipitous.

beanh8er
04-16-2011, 03:05 PM
Yea he was scheduled for a 2 day workout Thursday and Friday

hooshoops
04-16-2011, 03:28 PM
Gruden had good points for Mallett to take note of...I didn't get the sense that some did that Gruden didn't like Mallett. Because of who Mallett is as a player, he knows he's not a Michael Vick, that sort of thing...he's going to have to know MORE about protections and blitzes and everything than the average QB. That's his challenge, be better with that stuff than anyone else. Don't leave sink calls or fan calls up to your back and right tackle. If you need to be the guy that makes all those calls in order to make sure they're right, so be it...tell your coaches that, and then show that you can do it.

thats it in a nutshell...if ryan mallet doesn't have a very high level understanding of protections and do some really in depth film study of different blitz packages and recognize them and check into the right things he's gonna struggle...cause teams imo in the pros are gonna be foaming at the mouth to come after him...

and what i saw in that gruden qb camp bothered me a bit...especially the unaccounted for from jump street edge rusher that mallet not only didn't check out of the play he rolled right into the blitzer...to me it doesn't get more basic than that look...

rickd13
04-16-2011, 03:57 PM
thats it in a nutshell...if ryan mallet doesn't have a very high level understanding of protections and do some really in depth film study of different blitz packages and recognize them and check into the right things he's gonna struggle...cause teams imo in the pros are gonna be foaming at the mouth to come after him...

and what i saw in that gruden qb camp bothered me a bit...especially the unaccounted for from jump street edge rusher that mallet not only didn't check out of the play he rolled right into the blitzer...to me it doesn't get more basic than that look...

This is exactly what bothered me. Not only does Mallett have to be protected better than most QBs, you have to trust that he is going to be the hardest working QB in the league because he has very little margin for error buying time for himself in the pocket. He is going to have to understand what defenses are trying to do to him every time they blitz him. I don't know if I like the combination of Mallett's lack of athleticism and trusting him to be one of the hardest working, smartest QBs in the league.

ckparrothead
04-17-2011, 12:46 AM
It doesn't bother me that out of all that tape they managed to find one time where he didn't account for a blitzer. In fact as far as they were concerned they found three times and it turned out that only one of them was really on Mallett.

KB21
04-17-2011, 01:15 AM
It doesn't bother me that out of all that tape they managed to find one time where he didn't account for a blitzer. In fact as far as they were concerned they found three times and it turned out that only one of them was really on Mallett.

I agree. You could take every quarterback prospect in this draft and find that one instance where they didn't identify the blitzer that was coming pre snap.

I thought an interesting back and forth in that segment was when they looked at the play vs Mississippi State where the back missed the block on Pernell McPhee (why you would having a back blocking McPhee, I have no idea). Gruden asked Mallett if he was getting mad when looking at that, and Mallett said he was mad at himself. Gruden then pressed him and asked him what he would tell the guy who missed that block. Mallett just said "That's your man, you have to get him," but he said he would probably say it more forcefully than that or something to that nature.

I was watching the Arkansas spring game today, and they interviewed Mallett. I missed that interview, but they also interviewed DJ Williams. DJ made a point that should sink home and I think it is true. DJ said that there is not another quarterback in the draft that can throw the ball like Ryan Mallett. When you have that kind of throwing talent and that kind of feel for the passing game, you have to consider it. If there were no rumors or unsubstantiated questions about his character, Ryan Mallett would likely be the unquestioned top quarterback prospect in this draft, at least in my opinion. He is by far the best pure passer, IMO, and that's what I'm looking for in a quarterback. He's also had probably more responsibility at the line relative to making protection calls, checking the run, and making audibles of any quarterback in this draft.

Dogbone34
04-17-2011, 01:27 AM
i think we'll have pulled a fast one if we get out with mallet at #15

he's a perfect fit in miami

Spesh
04-17-2011, 01:45 AM
This is exactly what bothered me. Not only does Mallett have to be protected better than most QBs, you have to trust that he is going to be the hardest working QB in the league because he has very little margin for error buying time for himself in the pocket. He is going to have to understand what defenses are trying to do to him every time they blitz him. I don't know if I like the combination of Mallett's lack of athleticism and trusting him to be one of the hardest working, smartest QBs in the league.

Part of the problem we have is: we are Miami Dolphins fans. We saw perfection for a long period of time, then had that lack of (anything near) perfection for a long period of time. We are both antsy and pessimistic.

There are video's showing Ryan Mallett not doing everything flawless. If he had never made a mistake in college, he wouldnt be in discussion for being available at the 15th pick. He wouldnt be available for the 2nd pick. If we draft Mallett, were not going to immediately toss him a gold jacket and ask him for his ideas on what our 2011 superbowl ring design should be.

The encouraging thing here is, at his ripe old age of 22 he gets the mental part of it. He understands defenses, he understands how to break them down, and he understands film study. Some quarterbacks(not mentioning names) never figure that stuff out or are unable to bring it onto the field with them. I have very serious doubts that one day he's going to look up at the board and suddenly blank out and never improve. He shouldnt just plateau and he certainly should pick up more as he gains more experience.

ckparrothead
04-17-2011, 01:46 AM
I agree. You could take every quarterback prospect in this draft and find that one instance where they didn't identify the blitzer that was coming pre snap.

I thought an interesting back and forth in that segment was when they looked at the play vs Mississippi State where the back missed the block on Pernell McPhee (why you would having a back blocking McPhee, I have no idea). Gruden asked Mallett if he was getting mad when looking at that, and Mallett said he was mad at himself. Gruden then pressed him and asked him what he would tell the guy who missed that block. Mallett just said "That's your man, you have to get him," but he said he would probably say it more forcefully than that or something to that nature.

I was watching the Arkansas spring game today, and they interviewed Mallett. I missed that interview, but they also interviewed DJ Williams. DJ made a point that should sink home and I think it is true. DJ said that there is not another quarterback in the draft that can throw the ball like Ryan Mallett. When you have that kind of throwing talent and that kind of feel for the passing game, you have to consider it. If there were no rumors or unsubstantiated questions about his character, Ryan Mallett would likely be the unquestioned top quarterback prospect in this draft, at least in my opinion. He is by far the best pure passer, IMO, and that's what I'm looking for in a quarterback. He's also had probably more responsibility at the line relative to making protection calls, checking the run, and making audibles of any quarterback in this draft.

Couldn't agree more.

rickd13
04-17-2011, 07:14 AM
Part of the problem we have is: we are Miami Dolphins fans. We saw perfection for a long period of time, then had that lack of (anything near) perfection for a long period of time. We are both antsy and pessimistic.

There are video's showing Ryan Mallett not doing everything flawless. If he had never made a mistake in college, he wouldnt be in discussion for being available at the 15th pick. He wouldnt be available for the 2nd pick. If we draft Mallett, were not going to immediately toss him a gold jacket and ask him for his ideas on what our 2011 superbowl ring design should be.

The encouraging thing here is, at his ripe old age of 22 he gets the mental part of it. He understands defenses, he understands how to break them down, and he understands film study. Some quarterbacks(not mentioning names) never figure that stuff out or are unable to bring it onto the field with them. I have very serious doubts that one day he's going to look up at the board and suddenly blank out and never improve. He shouldnt just plateau and he certainly should pick up more as he gains more experience.


I agree with you on the fact that he can improve, but you also have to take into account the fact that NFL defenses are faster and way more complex than the college defenses Mallett faced. Defenses in the pros are going to find his weaknesses and exploit them every time they face him. By, the way, I'm not totally dead set against drafting Mallett. I am, however, absolutely against moving up in the draft to get him like some suggest, and I would much rather see the Dolphins draft Christian Ponder. I think Ponder is completely clean off the field, and on the field I think he has more than a capable arm, and is way more athletic than Mallett could ever dream of being. I think Ponder has a chance to improvise and buy time or take off and make a play with his feet when a play breaks down.

hooshoops
04-17-2011, 08:44 AM
of course you could find one instance with any qb where they didn't id the blitzer presnap...the way gruden was talkin about mallett during that portion of the segment i just got the feel this was not an isolated incident...if it is then yeah its water under the bridge

ckparrothead
04-17-2011, 09:44 AM
of course you could find one instance with any qb where they didn't id the blitzer presnap...the way gruden was talkin about mallett during that portion of the segment i just got the feel this was not an isolated incident...if it is then yeah its water under the bridge

That's probably because, like I said, he thought he had three instances of it...and only found out on camera during filming that he only had one instance of it. His point was that Ryan has to be better at that than the average bear and I think that was a point well-taken.

tical
04-17-2011, 09:55 AM
I don't know how anyone can watch that whiteboard session with Mallett and also the parts where Gruden pop quizzes him on football concepts...and not just absolutely salivate to get him in your huddle. That whiteboard session and Mallett's ability to talk about football concepts and theory just blows away ALL of the other guys that have done sessions with Gruden this year. You see the way Gruden's face lit up when Mallett got on that whiteboard and he just had to say "God damn there's a lot going on with that play!"

Gruden's a West Coast guy. If he prefers speed with his QBs, that's not exactly surprising. You can get a guy faster. You can work on his tempo and you can use your program to make him a better athlete. But the feet are only going to work as fast as the brain and guys that don't process information on the field as quickly as Mallett can have all the athleticism in the world, they're still going to look slow-footed. Look at Chad Henne. Get him in those Combine-like drills he actually does much better than you'd think. Put him on the field, everything's slow.

I think most people that I've spoken with including yesterday the Burmeister debate we had for NFL Network, plus Greg Cosell, everyone acknowledges this guy Ryan Mallett is 1st round all the way as far as his talent goes. He's a good QB prospect. If you're comfortable with his character issues, it should be a no-brainer...if you have the need at the position which the Dolphins do.

Your a wiseman, that was exactly my impression and my comment in the previous post. Prior to the white board session you found your self going...okay, but once he started writing and explaining, personally i began to smile! Theirs some serious FB IQ their boyz!

ckparrothead
04-17-2011, 10:06 AM
Your a wiseman, that was exactly my impression and my comment in the previous post. Prior to the white board session you found your self going...okay, but once he started writing and explaining, personally i began to smile! Theirs some serious FB IQ their boyz!

No kidding. Football IQ is right.

That's what I don't get. Hasn't Ben Roethlisberger showed us that you can be an incredi-douche in this league but if you have a great Football IQ, a commitment to your craft, and natural talent...you can still win it all? I mean, what am I missing. We don't even KNOW that Mallett is an incredi-douche. It's just a theory, based seemingly on some immature moments as a true freshman at Michigan, an accent, and the fact that he was a partier (alcohol, perhaps drugs). I don't think that's enough to convince me he's a Roethlisberger-style incredi-douche, but even if he was, he's got that Football IQ and an OBVIOUS commitment to his craft, to go with all that talent...so what's the big deal?

KB21
04-17-2011, 10:16 AM
I agree with you on the fact that he can improve, but you also have to take into account the fact that NFL defenses are faster and way more complex than the college defenses Mallett faced. Defenses in the pros are going to find his weaknesses and exploit them every time they face him. By, the way, I'm not totally dead set against drafting Mallett. I am, however, absolutely against moving up in the draft to get him like some suggest, and I would much rather see the Dolphins draft Christian Ponder. I think Ponder is completely clean off the field, and on the field I think he has more than a capable arm, and is way more athletic than Mallett could ever dream of being. I think Ponder has a chance to improvise and buy time or take off and make a play with his feet when a play breaks down.

I agree that in the NFL, defenses are a lot faster and more physical than he ever faced at the college level, but this idea that the media loves push stating that mobility is more important than ever at this position in the NFL is pure bunk. If anything, the speed of the defenses in the NFL is why more mobile quarterbacks tend to flop once they get to the NFL....i.e....Vince Young.

An aspect that is much more important than mobility is pocket awareness. Ryan Mallett has this. He can identify the blitz, sense were pressure is coming from, redirect his body, reset his feet, and throw the ball accurately. Now, he does do this inconsistently. Sometimes, he lets his upper body mechanics go bad when he does this, and that's the reason for some poor throws. Another thing with Mallett is that he isn't going to throw the ball away much at all. When he redirects, he's still looking for someone to throw the ball to.

Also, this idea that Mallett is going to be more prone to being sacked because he doesn't run is bunk as well.

Here is the percentage of sacks per pass attempt Mallett had vs two more mobile guys:

Ryan Mallett 5.7%
Cam Newton 7.6%
Christian Ponder 7.1%

Mallett also dropped back to pass more than a 100 times more than either of these other two quarterbacks.

Now, I like Christian Ponder. If Miami decides to go with him, then I'm not against it. Ponder fits more of what Tony Sparano stated he wanted at the end of the season. With that said though, Ryan Mallett is the best passer in this draft.

rickd13
04-17-2011, 10:33 AM
I agree that in the NFL, defenses are a lot faster and more physical than he ever faced at the college level, but this idea that the media loves push stating that mobility is more important than ever at this position in the NFL is pure bunk. If anything, the speed of the defenses in the NFL is why more mobile quarterbacks tend to flop once they get to the NFL....i.e....Vince Young.

An aspect that is much more important than mobility is pocket awareness. Ryan Mallett has this. He can identify the blitz, sense were pressure is coming from, redirect his body, reset his feet, and throw the ball accurately. Now, he does do this inconsistently. Sometimes, he lets his upper body mechanics go bad when he does this, and that's the reason for some poor throws. Another thing with Mallett is that he isn't going to throw the ball away much at all. When he redirects, he's still looking for someone to throw the ball to.

Also, this idea that Mallett is going to be more prone to being sacked because he doesn't run is bunk as well.

Here is the percentage of sacks per pass attempt Mallett had vs two more mobile guys:

Ryan Mallett 5.7%
Cam Newton 7.6%
Christian Ponder 7.1%

Mallett also dropped back to pass more than a 100 times more than either of these other two quarterbacks.

Now, I like Christian Ponder. If Miami decides to go with him, then I'm not against it. Ponder fits more of what Tony Sparano stated he wanted at the end of the season. With that said though, Ryan Mallett is the best passer in this draft.

I agree about pocket passers. I am not one that believes that pocket passers are a thing of the past. I'm just skeptical that Mallett has the movement and instincts in the pocket that many on here believe he has. I'm scared to death that he will be a worse version of Drew Bledsoe in the pocket.

ckparrothead
04-17-2011, 10:49 AM
For all these comparisons to Drew Bledsoe, if you can get a Drew Bledsoe career at #15 overall...that's a pretty good deal.

To me when I watch Mallett under pressure there's a big difference.

If he's dealing with pressure that he expected NOT to be there, he gets into trouble a lot of the time. You know, against Georgia he's setting up in the pocket with normal rhythm but his blind side protected gets beat like a rented mule on a speed rush. Mallett starts in on his throw and then feels the guy crash into his legs and has big enough hands that he can tuck the ball and fall on it instead of fumbling or throwing an interceptable floater.

You look at the plays Gruden brought up in the QB Camp, the first one Mallett didn't see the guy ready to come at him from the play side. That's his fault, should have seen it. He didn't do well with it because he didn't identify it and so when he's coming around on his boot the guy is right in his grill. He certainly didn't throw a pick or anything...but he wasn't about to complete a pass either. The two other plays, his tailback forgot to make a sink call and Mallett expected the pressure to be picked up. Not an interception or anything, but not a play he was about to complete. The other play, Dominguez is supposed to make a fan call and doesn't. Again, Mallett didn't expect the breakdown, so I don't think he completed it.

But then you have a whole mass of plays where the blitz is coming, he identifies it and has a feel for where the pressure is going to come from, where he needs to step and how quickly he needs to get the ball out to his hots. He develops and executes plans for pressure, especially pressure by a single guy. He sees early a guy coming in unblocked, steps to avoid him. Or he backs up and throws off his back foot. Or he just gets the ball out and changes his release so that he doesn't have to worry about it getting batted. If it's within his field of vision (not his blind side) then he can see when a guy is getting beat right off the snap, feel that and do something about it immediately right in his drop.

You really can quicken up a guy's feet and make him a little bit better an athlete, work on his tempo a little, if he has the mental aptitude for processing things like that. But you're going to have a tougher time finding a guy that doesn't process all that information, doesn't "feel" the rush...and making him process more information, more quickly, and get him to feel the rush. I think one is a lot easier to improve than the other.

enJeppesen
04-17-2011, 02:50 PM
I think Mallett was great in that clip.

Roonnette
04-18-2011, 07:09 AM
Cam Newton looked lost in the study room (as expected), and great on the turf (as expected).


BTW, it looks like the Titans and Redskins are the biggest competition to The Dolphins for Mallett's services.

LouPhinFan
04-18-2011, 08:17 AM
I DVR'd it and watched it Saturday night. I was impressed with his marker board work and its obvious Gruden was too. Sure he missed the call on the blitz, but how many times did that happen? I doubt that happened on a regular basis. Every QB will miss a call or a coverage, unless its a common occurance I'm not too concerned about it.

CK, you've obviously seen alot of tape on the kid. How many times did you see him miss a protection call? I mean his own fault, not a RB wiffing on a block

Trust me, Bobby Petrino QBs will be prepared for the NFL from a scheme standpoint. The only gap will be in how that QB processes the information. Brian Brohm was an excellent college QB while here at Louisville under Petrino. He didn't have the strongest arm I'd ever seen, but he was accurate and should have made a top notch WCO QB pro. Unfortunately he had trouble processing the information on the field quickly and still has never caught on. I don't think Mallett is the same. He processes information very quickly, obviously from this whiteboard session. I think his height really helps him do it. Being able to "look down" on the field in a psuedo-Madden video game view surely can't hurt. There's a big difference between 6'3" (Brohm) and almost 6'8" (Mallett).

hooshoops
04-18-2011, 09:26 AM
not that it matters but i don't know what was so jaw dropping about the whiteboard work...he called out the different route combinations based on coverage looks pretty much for a play...

i guess the fact that gruden may have picked that particular play out of all malletts tape makes it more impressive he could do it on the fly but i kinda expect my qb to be able to go to the board and explain to me whats goin on if its a staple of the play book...i guess it shows the guys no idiot and he put in work to know the offense which is encouraging but again i think that should be pretty much a given if you're seriously considering drafting him as a franchise qb

i don't recall if mallett actually gave gruden a 1st thru 4th like progression break down either...i would have liked to see that

BlueFin
04-18-2011, 09:27 AM
I've seen the Mallett one last week, have the Locker one recorded for later.

Fin Thirteen
04-18-2011, 10:25 AM
An aspect that is much more important than mobility is pocket awareness. Ryan Mallett has this. He can identify the blitz, sense were pressure is coming from, redirect his body, reset his feet, and throw the ball accurately. Now, he does do this inconsistently. Sometimes, he lets his upper body mechanics go bad when he does this, and that's the reason for some poor throws. Another thing with Mallett is that he isn't going to throw the ball away much at all. When he redirects, he's still looking for someone to throw the ball to.

This is the key aspect of Mallet's play that's going to determine if he's a boom or a bust, IMO. He's certainly quite elusive, in a minimalist sort of way that buys him a fraction to get the ball away. That's either going to serve him very well in the NFL (because awareness and elusiveness is arguably more important than mobility) OR he's going to find that the extra second he bought in college is half a second in the NFL. His completion rate is going to get examined in that sense.

Because he's ALWAYS looking to complete the play (until it's coached out of him) that implies more picks rather than sacks.

So, it's a coin toss for me whether his brand of elusiveness in the pocket will buy him enough time in the NFL to complete passes, esp with his tendency to go for it. Assuming he can improve his sharpness in staying free, I think he's a good bet to have a productive NFL career.

If he gets worked out though as a guy who can be pressured into giving up picks, the Mallet fever might not be quite so rabid as it seems to be today in Fin circles.

I tend to think he can improve in the pocket. I'd rather a guy with good pocket awareness and limited mobility than the other way around.

TrinidadDolfan
04-18-2011, 12:05 PM
I'm not totally dead set against drafting Mallett. I am, however, absolutely against moving up in the draft to get him like some suggest

Sorry to say this Rik,

But you totally exposed yourself there. Let me get this straight....you would not be against drafting Mallett at 15......but you would be totally against moving up to get him.


You draft a QB in the 1st round because you believe he may be a FRANCHISE QB.

If you believe your choice is a Franchise QB, then why would you be totally against grabbing him a bit higher?????
If you believe he IS NOT a Franchise QB, then why would you go along with drafting him at #15??

Duh.

I thank God everyday that Rickd13 is not in our War Room

Roman529
04-18-2011, 01:43 PM
It looks like Cam Newton never called any plays at Auburn or even operated from a playbook. They kept things simple and he just looked over at the sidelines for the # of the play. I think Newton is a year or two away before he will be ready for a pro style offense. I just wonder if Newton will drop out of the Top Ten now. His interview with Gruden has to make a lot of GM's/Coaches wonder if he can play in a pro style offense. On the other hand, I was really impressed with Mallett's demeanor with Gruden, how he called him "Sir," and how he doesn't come across as cocky and arrogant like Newton. I think if Mallett is there at #15, he should be our pick.

enJeppesen
04-18-2011, 01:44 PM
Mallett certainly is miles ahead of Newton in terms of game knowledge. He couldnt even give a verbal play because every single play was called from the sidelines and he just went up and dived forward...christ good luck panthers

ckparrothead
04-18-2011, 02:13 PM
I love Mallett as much as the next guy and I do believe his whiteboard work with Gruden was extremely impressive, because of the speed with which he drew up the play, the detail he was able to easily drill down to in terms of the option routes on the play, the defensive key reads, which two routes were his hot route options, which side of the field he would work in what scenario, and where his progression would be in another scenario. He labeled something like three or four different scenarios which he would read pre-snap or during the drop and would dictate the starting point (but not necessarily the ending point) of his progression. He showed a full understanding of every player's role on the play and why it's drawn up that way.

Meanwhile Andy Dalton gets up there, draws four vertical routes and an outlet route, and when asked what he reads on the play he just knocks the whiteboard three times with the marker. And this is a reportedly "heady" guy that is supposed to be a winner.

You expect your franchise quarterback in the pros to be able to do what Mallett did. Unfortunately, very few of them come out of college being able to do that. Having such a firm grasp on a very complicated playbook at such an early stage of your career can only mean good things. It's not the end-all, be-all. If a guy doesn't know that stuff coming out, he will soon...because they'll teach it to him. You just have to be sure he has the potential to learn it. Teams are already well-aware of what Newton's offense was like at Auburn, even if Gruden was not. They know they're going to have to start from scratch to teach him verbiage and the intricacies of an NFL playbook. They're more concerned with trying to figure out if he has the potential to learn those things, and I take it they think he does, since there's some heavy demand for him.

What the whiteboard work does for me is show me that the character concerns for Ryan Mallett are overblown. You can't tell if a guy loves football and is willing to work at it by finding the few players he's played with in his high school and college career that were rubbed the wrong way by him and think he's a jerk. You can't tell it by looking at an arrest report for being drunk near a nightspot at 20 years old. And you sure as hell can't tell by a man's accent or way of speaking. You can tell by watching the man go up on the whiteboard like Mallett did, or start explaining to you the theory and goals behind some offensive concepts.

enJeppesen
04-18-2011, 02:15 PM
I think it was clear that Gruden knew and was just poking at Newton to see his response

and to me he didnt do so well..Maybe he uses "#36" in a game situation but he should be able to just spurt out what that play entails

tical
04-18-2011, 02:16 PM
It looks like Cam Newton never called any plays at Auburn or even operated from a playbook. They kept things simple and he just looked over at the sidelines for the # of the play. I think Newton is a year or two away before he will be ready for a pro style offense. I just wonder if Newton will drop out of the Top Ten now. His interview with Gruden has to make a lot of GM's/Coaches wonder if he can play in a pro style offense. On the other hand, I was really impressed with Mallett's demeanor with Gruden, how he called him "Sir," and how he doesn't come across as cocky and arrogant like Newton. I think if Mallett is there at #15, he should be our pick.

Newton is scary!

ROADRUNNER
04-18-2011, 02:18 PM
I love Mallett as much as the next guy and I do believe his whiteboard work with Gruden was extremely impressive, because of the speed with which he drew up the play, the detail he was able to easily drill down to in terms of the option routes on the play, the defensive key reads, which two routes were his hot route options, which side of the field he would work in what scenario, and where his progression would be in another scenario. He labeled something like three or four different scenarios which he would read pre-snap or during the drop and would dictate the starting point (but not necessarily the ending point) of his progression. He showed a full understanding of every player's role on the play and why it's drawn up that way.

Meanwhile Andy Dalton gets up there, draws four vertical routes and an outlet route, and when asked what he reads on the play he just knocks the whiteboard three times with the marker. And this is a reportedly "heady" guy that is supposed to be a winner.

You expect your franchise quarterback in the pros to be able to do what Mallett did. Unfortunately, very few of them come out of college being able to do that. Having such a firm grasp on a very complicated playbook at such an early stage of your career can only mean good things. It's not the end-all, be-all. If a guy doesn't know that stuff coming out, he will soon...because they'll teach it to him. You just have to be sure he has the potential to learn it. Teams are already well-aware of what Newton's offense was like at Auburn, even if Gruden was not. They know they're going to have to start from scratch to teach him verbiage and the intricacies of an NFL playbook. They're more concerned with trying to figure out if he has the potential to learn those things, and I take it they think he does, since there's some heavy demand for him.

What the whiteboard work does for me is show me that the character concerns for Ryan Mallett are overblown. You can't tell if a guy loves football and is willing to work at it by finding the few players he's played with in his high school and college career that were rubbed the wrong way by him and think he's a jerk. You can't tell it by looking at an arrest report for being drunk near a nightspot at 20 years old. And you sure as hell can't tell by a man's accent or way of speaking. You can tell by watching the man go up on the whiteboard like Mallett did, or start explaining to you the theory and goals behind some offensive concepts.

...........:lol2:

tical
04-18-2011, 02:18 PM
I love Mallett as much as the next guy and I do believe his whiteboard work with Gruden was extremely impressive, because of the speed with which he drew up the play, the detail he was able to easily drill down to in terms of the option routes on the play, the defensive key reads, which two routes were his hot route options, which side of the field he would work in what scenario, and where his progression would be in another scenario. He labeled something like three or four different scenarios which he would read pre-snap or during the drop and would dictate the starting point (but not necessarily the ending point) of his progression. He showed a full understanding of every player's role on the play and why it's drawn up that way.

Meanwhile Andy Dalton gets up there, draws four vertical routes and an outlet route, and when asked what he reads on the play he just knocks the whiteboard three times with the marker. And this is a reportedly "heady" guy that is supposed to be a winner.

You expect your franchise quarterback in the pros to be able to do what Mallett did. Unfortunately, very few of them come out of college being able to do that. Having such a firm grasp on a very complicated playbook at such an early stage of your career can only mean good things. It's not the end-all, be-all. If a guy doesn't know that stuff coming out, he will soon...because they'll teach it to him. You just have to be sure he has the potential to learn it. Teams are already well-aware of what Newton's offense was like at Auburn, even if Gruden was not. They know they're going to have to start from scratch to teach him verbiage and the intricacies of an NFL playbook. They're more concerned with trying to figure out if he has the potential to learn those things, and I take it they think he does, since there's some heavy demand for him.

What the whiteboard work does for me is show me that the character concerns for Ryan Mallett are overblown. You can't tell if a guy loves football and is willing to work at it by finding the few players he's played with in his high school and college career that were rubbed the wrong way by him and think he's a jerk. You can't tell it by looking at an arrest report for being drunk near a nightspot at 20 years old. And you sure as hell can't tell by a man's accent or way of speaking. You can tell by watching the man go up on the whiteboard like Mallett did, or start explaining to you the theory and goals behind some offensive concepts.


Yep! its was beautiful, what more needs to be said...i swear man if we have an opportunity to draft him and we pass...the first JETS fan i see...right in the FACE!

TedSlimmJr
04-18-2011, 03:35 PM
The team that drafts Cam Newton in the 1st round is in for a rude awakening... probably even moreso than he is once he gets to the NFL. There ain't no flash cards in the NFL Cam...

He's going to have to learn how to orchestrate an offense all the way from getting under center, to adjusting protections, to identifying coverages and leveraging techniques, etc... and all this is just prior to receiving the snap. Nevermind going through progressions...

It goes back to my point a long time ago about how simple Malzahn makes an offense that "looks" complicated, and makes it 3rd grade simple for his quarterback... that is the genius of Gus Malzahn. Daycare is over... they can't do it for you in the NFL.

The piece with Gruden was an unmitigated disaster, even if he hadn't compared himself to a gun with ammunition.

If Carolina takes this quarterback with the #1 overall pick, it will be the most bizarre 1st overall pick I've seen in a long time.

If they expected me to draft a quarterback like this in the 1st round... they might as well just fire my *** now...

rickd13
04-18-2011, 04:34 PM
Sorry to say this Rik,

But you totally exposed yourself there. Let me get this straight....you would not be against drafting Mallett at 15......but you would be totally against moving up to get him.


You draft a QB in the 1st round because you believe he may be a FRANCHISE QB.

If you believe your choice is a Franchise QB, then why would you be totally against grabbing him a bit higher?????
If you believe he IS NOT a Franchise QB, then why would you go along with drafting him at #15??

Duh.

I thank God everyday that Rickd13 is not in our War Room

There are too many red flags with Mallett to move up for him. He is not a sure thing. By your logic, the Dolphins should be willing to trade up to the number one spot in order to draft him. That might be how they do it in Trinidad, but that is not how we do it here in the greatest country in the history of mankind.