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View Full Version : NFLRA & NFL close to deal, refs could be on field as early as this weekend



phinatic1399
09-26-2012, 12:32 PM
The NFL and the NFL Referees Association made enough progress in negotiations Tuesday night that the possibility of the locked-out officials returning in time to work this week's games has been discussed, according to sources on both sides.
An agreement in principle is at hand, according to one source familiar to talks, although NFL owners have postured with a "no more compromise" stance.
Although league sources said it would take a week to get the locked-out officials on the field, the NFLRA says its 121 referees have been trained on the new rules implemented last season, have already passed physicals or are prepared to pass physicals immediately. New official game uniforms designed by Nike are "hardly an obstacle," according to a source.
Both sides have made concessions on previous sticking points such as a taxi squad of 21 new officials and pension plans that sources say the final meaningful hurdle is, as one source said, "about a little more money."


http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/8427652/locked-nfl-referees-return-early-week-sources


(http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/8427652/locked-nfl-referees-return-early-week-sources)
(http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/8427652/locked-nfl-referees-return-early-week-sources) ESPN's Chris Mortensen is reporting that an agreement between the NFL and NFLRA is at hand.

With a deal in principle reached Wednesday morning, the regular officials could be back as soon as this week. All it took was one of the worst calls in league history in front of a national audience on Monday Night Football. The issue will hopefully be put to bed now.

(http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/8427652/locked-nfl-referees-return-early-week-sources)
rotoworld.com

Roman529
09-26-2012, 12:41 PM
I heard the ref's demands only would cost the NFL $3 million/year. That is such a small amount in a $9 billion business. I am sure Jerry Jones and the other big wig's could call their local bank and have them cut a check for this amount in five minutes flat. I think the refs want a guaranteed pension, and not just a 401K. Maybe just make the refs full-time year round employees. I think they make $150,000 as part-timers....that is great money for working just 16 to 20 games a year. I miss Ed Hochuli showing off his guns. :lol:

phinatic1399
09-26-2012, 12:42 PM
I heard the ref's demands only would cost the NFL $3 million. That is such a small amount in a $9 billion business.

I know such a joke, the NFL grosses close to $10 billion and that number is growing but they cant afford pensions?

NY8123
09-26-2012, 12:46 PM
Ahhh but the right call was made in the Packers/Hawks game.........sure, I'll believe ya when me **** turns purple and smells like rainbow sherbet.

Anvil35
09-26-2012, 12:46 PM
F&%$ unions!! They are the reason we are in the economic situation this country finds itself...

JCane
09-26-2012, 12:47 PM
I know such a joke, the NFL grosses close to $10 billion and that number is growing but they cant afford pensions?

The refs asking for a pension is a flat-out JOKE. What kind of successful business do you know just pisses away money?

These refs work PART-TIME and want a pension. A pension that THEY DON'T HAVE TO CONTRIBUTE TO.

Name a company that offers that for even FULL-TIME employee.

Yeah...I'll wait.

flynryan15
09-26-2012, 12:48 PM
Every game is literally clown college! The scabs can barely tie their own shoes.

phinatic1399
09-26-2012, 12:49 PM
F&%$ unions!! They are the reason we are in the economic situation this country finds itself...

that has nothing to do with this, some companies cant afford pensions anymore we all know that but a $10 billion a year empire definitely can, it's pennies.

JCane
09-26-2012, 12:51 PM
that has nothing to do with this, some companies cant afford pensions anymore we all know that but a $10 billion a year empire definitely can, it's pennies.

Pennies lol. Please.

This pension demand is straight robbery. I can't believe it. NFL should Hollywood Hogan these clowns and tell them to, "STICK IT, BROTHER!"

Hayden Fox
09-26-2012, 12:51 PM
I think the replacement refs helped the Fins actually. lol.

flynryan15
09-26-2012, 12:53 PM
The refs asking for a pension is a flat-out JOKE. What kind of successful business do you know just pisses away money?

These refs work PART-TIME and want a pension. A pension that THEY DON'T HAVE TO CONTRIBUTE TO.

Name a company that offers that for even FULL-TIME employee.

Yeah...I'll wait.

Delta Airlines, Alaska Airlines, United Airlines, American Airlines(for now) all offer several defined pension plans, and I'm sure you would consider our schedule part time because I average 15.5 days off in a normal month and in a vacation week run into a month off.

JCane
09-26-2012, 12:55 PM
NFL should look into creating a school for officials. Baseball has a school for umpire. Rigorous courses. Vision tests ever so often, etc.

NFL could benefit greatly from this.

http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/official_info/umpires/how_to_become.jsp

---------- Post added at 12:55 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:54 PM ----------


Delta Airlines, Alaska Airlines, United Airlines, American Airlines(for now) all offer several defined pension plans, and I'm sure you would consider our schedule part time because I average 15.5 days off in a normal month and in a vacation week run into a month off.

Do you have to contribute to this pension plan?

flynryan15
09-26-2012, 01:01 PM
NFL should look into creating a school for officials. Baseball has a school for umpire. Rigorous courses. Vision tests ever so often, etc.

NFL could benefit greatly from this.

http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/official_info/umpires/how_to_become.jsp

---------- Post added at 12:55 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:54 PM ----------



Do you have to contribute to this pension plan?

Every plan is different at every airline, they are specific to the cba, and labor group. The company contributes and you can match at my airline that is for both 401k and defined pension plan.

Fins1971
09-26-2012, 01:06 PM
I think the replacement refs helped the Fins actually. lol.

Yep, that is my take also. Several calls in Jet game went our way.
Eventually the odds will turn and we'll get a bad call against us though.

flynryan15
09-26-2012, 01:10 PM
Look at that link you provided and the pipeline to become a mlb umpire you make it through that you should be compensated handsomely! Same with the NFL the scabs have proven not every one can be a NFL ref! I had a retired NFL ref working as a replay official on my plane the last week of the preseason. He came up to chat during a delay, I noticed some sort of championship ring on him so I ask. It was from officiating the Pats, Rams Superbowl. Guess my look said it all because he quickly pointed out the replay refs are under a separate contact. So I picked his brain, trust me it isn't part time work and these guys make huge sacrifices to become a NFL ref!

The problem is the new generation of management that is driven by their bonuses have a mentality to fight their employee groups and paint them as villains in the process

Hayden Fox
09-26-2012, 02:02 PM
Yep, that is my take also. Several calls in Jet game went our way.
Eventually the odds will turn and we'll get a bad call against us though.

I will never forgive Gene Steratore.

I always thought Bob Kraft got away with things whenever we played the Pats. We never got any calls vs. the Pats.

JCane
09-26-2012, 02:11 PM
Every plan is different at every airline, they are specific to the cba, and labor group. The company contributes and you can match at my airline that is for both 401k and defined pension plan.

So you do have to contribute to the pension then.

I'm not saying that what the officials do doesn't take a lot of hard work and preparation. It's a thankless job as well. Not once has a game been played and the officials been commended by either fan base for a job well done. It's not easy to be an official. However, the guys who are holding out right now are NOT the only guys in the world who can do that job. Others can learn and hone their skills to become an official. It's certainly possible. Right now these replacement officials are in over their head. It would be like you flying a remote controlled model airplane and then being asked to land an actual 747 lol. You need some tune up time.

A pension for these guys is just plan crazy. I wouldn't be so opposed to the pension idea if they had to contribute to the pension but they're just strong arming the NFL. And I can't say I blame them. I've always said that one man is only worth what another man is willing to pay for him. So if the NFL is willing to give them everything they ask for, then obviously the NFL feels that these guys are worth it. Personally, I wouldn't give it to them pero the negotiating tactics of the officials is on point.

SCOTTY
09-26-2012, 02:12 PM
Delta Airlines, Alaska Airlines, United Airlines, American Airlines(for now) all offer several defined pension plans, and I'm sure you would consider our schedule part time because I average 15.5 days off in a normal month and in a vacation week run into a month off.

Aren't these gaurenteed pensions bankrupting the Airlines, the car companies, state governments. Paying people a salary every year even after they retire. Never understood that one...

Vertical Limit
09-26-2012, 02:17 PM
Honestly I feel bad for the replacement referees. It must be embarrassing to come home to your family knowing so many people just straight up hate what you're doing. It's really not their fault, they shouldn't be here to begin with if the NFL just paid up.

JCane
09-26-2012, 02:20 PM
Aren't these gaurenteed pensions bankrupting the Airlines, the car companies, state governments. Paying people a salary every year even after they retire. Never understood that one...

Yeap lol. Noticed Southwest wasn't on that list.

BAGS FLY FREE!

jared81
09-26-2012, 02:22 PM
Delta Airlines, Alaska Airlines, United Airlines, American Airlines(for now) all offer several defined pension plans, and I'm sure you would consider our schedule part time because I average 15.5 days off in a normal month and in a vacation week run into a month off.


um yea. because the airlines are a model for financial stability. saying "the airlines do it" is exactly why the nfl shouldnt fall for this scheme.

J. David Wannyheimer
09-26-2012, 02:25 PM
Aren't these gaurenteed pensions bankrupting the Airlines, the car companies, state governments. Paying people a salary every year even after they retire. Never understood that one...

It's not the sole reason, but it's a huge part of the problem. As life expectancy increases across the board, then the amount of money required to fund pensions for retired employees increases at a staggering rate. You can't simply push back the retirement age because the employee unions will revolt -- never mind that having an aged workforce presents its own problems -- and having to fund burgeoning pensions means that you need to cut costs elsewhere. Typically, the first place those costs are cut is from the pockets of the employees who aren't yet collecting benefits.

Unions have their place, but there is a reason that the most heavily unionized industries in America are also the ones suffering the most during hard economic times. They simply can't compete on cost due to obligations that came about because management decided not to play hardball with an employee union twenty, thirty, or even fifty years ago.

People love to **** on 'management' as the root of all problems, but the simple fact is that when GM collapsed in 2008, the average fixed cost per car produced was about $2,000.00 higher than it was for Toyota and Nissan, and if you bother to examine the cost breakdown, well, let's just say the UAW has been damn successful at the negotiating table.

Awsi Dooger
09-26-2012, 07:02 PM
The problem is the new generation of management that is driven by their bonuses have a mentality to fight their employee groups and paint them as villains in the process

That's exactly correct, and as succinct as I've seen it stated. The anti-union push has been not only emboldened by applauded in recent years. That encourages ownership to apply the squeeze and then tighten it again and again, even if their business specifics or bottom line don't remotely compare to elsewhere. We've already seen that laughably attempted in this thread. SAMs are still eager to blame government for a broken fingernail while ignoring exploding corporate arrogance and greed. I wish I could share some of the examples I've witnessed in Las Vegas.

Heck, there's an example in suburban Miami. The Bacardi corporation purchased Calusa golf course in Kendall six or seven years ago. They attempted to turn it into a private course, and erect a huge wall blocking the view of adjacent homeowners. That plan failed as the economy slowed. Bacardi then ran Calusa into the ground. Intentionally. They operated the course out of a trailer and with a trailer, and later outhouses, as the sole bathrooms. The greens were destroyed, literally unplayable. The worst greenskeeper on the planet couldn't be that bad. Chemicals would produce massive barren spots. Then we'd hear they used the wrong chemical. Sure, that happens all the time from a specialist. It served exactly the purpose that Bacardi wanted it to serve, to run the regular golfers off the course. Parking lot all but vacant, day after day. Then Bacardi whined they couldn't make any money and closed the course in March 2011. Maybe they should sell their rum out of paper cups lined with mud and see how well they fare? That would be the equivalent. One minor problem for Bacardi, there's a 99 year covenant protecting that land as a golf course. It's not yet at the half way mark of the covenant. Bacardi knew all about that covenant. They didn't care in the slightest, about impact on the homeowners or anyone in the area who used the course for recreation. It's very familiar corporate tactics these days. I saw similar in Las Vegas from Billy Walters, purchasing golf course property then manipulating the Clark County Commission to get rid of restrictions on use of the land. In Calusa's case, with a huge winding property, it's estimated the land is worth $3 million as a golf course and $100 million if unrestricted. Bacardi closed the course in early 2011 and offered insulting $50,000 bribes to the 148 adjacent homeowners to sign a waiver on the covenant. They needed 75% signatures to free up the land. Not surprisingly, Bacardi was 100% self concerned. They offered the $50,000 to ONLY the first 75% who signed. Hilarious. Corporate greed at its finest. We'll wrangle the minimum we need then comfortably ignore everybody else. But along the line we'll claim the homeowners are our utmost concern. Sometimes you can't make this stuff up. Bottom line, the homeowners didn't cave. Expensive homes along that route. Not gullible suckers. Nice handicapping, Bacardi. Covenant was upheld, despite Bacardi's expensive hired gun lawyers. And it only gets better. Bacardi has given up on persuading the homeowners and is now SUING them. That's right, since you didn't bow down to our corporate desperation for that $100 million, cave in to our bribe, and swallow our talking points, we're now suing each and every one of you.

Sorry for the post. It may not fit in this forum so I intentionally cramped it into on one paragraph. The fact that so many ignoramuses coddle corporations and look the other way regardless of what they do is the most disgusting aspect of society right now, IMO.

Back to the refs, I'm not sure if it's irony or karma that the state that's been the focal point of the recent anti-union push had its cherished professional sports team screwed by scab labor.

Flip Tanneflop
09-26-2012, 11:00 PM
That's exactly correct, and as succinct as I've seen it stated. The anti-union push has been not only emboldened by applauded in recent years. That encourages ownership to apply the squeeze and then tighten it again and again, even if their business specifics or bottom line don't remotely compare to elsewhere. We've already seen that laughably attempted in this thread. SAMs are still eager to blame government for a broken fingernail while ignoring exploding corporate arrogance and greed. I wish I could share some of the examples I've witnessed in Las Vegas.

Heck, there's an example in suburban Miami. The Bacardi corporation purchased Calusa golf course in Kendall six or seven years ago. They attempted to turn it into a private course, and erect a huge wall blocking the view of adjacent homeowners. That plan failed as the economy slowed. Bacardi then ran Calusa into the ground. Intentionally. They operated the course out of a trailer and with a trailer, and later outhouses, as the sole bathrooms. The greens were destroyed, literally unplayable. The worst greenskeeper on the planet couldn't be that bad. Chemicals would produce massive barren spots. Then we'd hear they used the wrong chemical. Sure, that happens all the time from a specialist. It served exactly the purpose that Bacardi wanted it to serve, to run the regular golfers off the course. Parking lot all but vacant, day after day. Then Bacardi whined they couldn't make any money and closed the course in March 2011. Maybe they should sell their rum out of paper cups lined with mud and see how well they fare? That would be the equivalent. One minor problem for Bacardi, there's a 99 year covenant protecting that land as a golf course. It's not yet at the half way mark of the covenant. Bacardi knew all about that covenant. They didn't care in the slightest, about impact on the homeowners or anyone in the area who used the course for recreation. It's very familiar corporate tactics these days. I saw similar in Las Vegas from Billy Walters, purchasing golf course property then manipulating the Clark County Commission to get rid of restrictions on use of the land. In Calusa's case, with a huge winding property, it's estimated the land is worth $3 million as a golf course and $100 million if unrestricted. Bacardi closed the course in early 2011 and offered insulting $50,000 bribes to the 148 adjacent homeowners to sign a waiver on the covenant. They needed 75% signatures to free up the land. Not surprisingly, Bacardi was 100% self concerned. They offered the $50,000 to ONLY the first 75% who signed. Hilarious. Corporate greed at its finest. We'll wrangle the minimum we need then comfortably ignore everybody else. But along the line we'll claim the homeowners are our utmost concern. Sometimes you can't make this stuff up. Bottom line, the homeowners didn't cave. Expensive homes along that route. Not gullible suckers. Nice handicapping, Bacardi. Covenant was upheld, despite Bacardi's expensive hired gun lawyers. And it only gets better. Bacardi has given up on persuading the homeowners and is now SUING them. That's right, since you didn't bow down to our corporate desperation for that $100 million, cave in to our bribe, and swallow our talking points, we're now suing each and every one of you.

Sorry for the post. It may not fit in this forum so I intentionally cramped it into on one paragraph. The fact that so many ignoramuses coddle corporations and look the other way regardless of what they do is the most disgusting aspect of society right now, IMO.

Back to the refs, I'm not sure if it's irony or karma that the state that's been the focal point of the recent anti-union push had its cherished professional sports team screwed by scab labor.

Awsi FTMFW AGAIN!!!!