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BigFinFan
05-26-2004, 03:33 PM
Why has our Constitution survived longer than any other modern governing document?

Many of us take for granted the freedoms gained for us two centuries ago.

Fewer than half of us even bother to vote in national elections. The turnout for local elections is even more dismal.

Foreigners striving for citizenship in our nation tend to know much more about the nature of our republic than most of the people born in the United States. They have to; part of the road to U.S. citizenship involves a test.

Here are 10 questions similar to those faced by people who want most of all what we received by right of birth.

1. How many amendments have been added to the Constitution?

2. What are the first 10 amendments called?

3. What are the three branches of government?

4. How long is a Senator’s term of office?

5. How long is a member of the House of Representative’s term?

6. What rights does the First Amendment protect?

7. How many colonies did we have in 1776?

8. Who drafted the Declaration of Independence?

9. How many Senators are there?

10. How many members are in the House of Representatives?

No matter how well you scored, bear in mind the strength of commitment forged by a roomful of men in New York, who in 1776 declared their nation’s independence from monarchical rule – underscored by their closing line:

“And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”

P4E
05-26-2004, 04:02 PM
1. How many amendments have been added to the Constitution?

Guessing it's around 24 presently. I, ummm, should know this.:(

2. What are the first 10 amendments called?

The Bill of Rights

3. What are the three branches of government?

Legislative, Judicial, Executive

4. How long is a Senator’s term of office?

Six years

5. How long is a member of the House of Representative’s term?

Two years

6. What rights does the First Amendment protect?

Assuming you're looking for freedoms of speech and assembly

7. How many colonies did we have in 1776?

Thirteen

8. Who drafted the Declaration of Independence?

TJ

9. How many Senators are there?

One-hundred

10. How many members are in the House of Representatives?

Four-hundred thirty five

Scrap
05-26-2004, 04:12 PM
8. Who drafted the Declaration of Independence?

TJ



Pretty good P4E. Now can you tell me what round it got drafted in?

BigFinFan
05-26-2004, 04:40 PM
I will post the answers tomorrow in order to give more peopel a chance to Test their knowledge.

Very Good P4E

iceblizzard69
05-26-2004, 05:17 PM
If you don't know at least 8 of those, you should have never made it past 6th grade.

themole
05-26-2004, 07:03 PM
Why has our Constitution survived longer than any other modern governing document?

Many of us take for granted the freedoms gained for us two centuries ago.

Fewer than half of us even bother to vote in national elections. The turnout for local elections is even more dismal.

Foreigners striving for citizenship in our nation tend to know much more about the nature of our republic than most of the people born in the United States. They have to; part of the road to U.S. citizenship involves a test.

Here are 10 questions similar to those faced by people who want most of all what we received by right of birth.

1. How many amendments have been added to the Constitution?

2. What are the first 10 amendments called?

3. What are the three branches of government?

4. How long is a Senator’s term of office?

5. How long is a member of the House of Representative’s term?

6. What rights does the First Amendment protect?

7. How many colonies did we have in 1776?

8. Who drafted the Declaration of Independence?

9. How many Senators are there?

10. How many members are in the House of Representatives?

No matter how well you scored, bear in mind the strength of commitment forged by a roomful of men in New York, who in 1776 declared their nation’s independence from monarchical rule – underscored by their closing line:

“And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”



The answer to your first sentence is because our Constitution is EXTREMELY difficult to amend "change".

Therefore the politicians "though many have tried" can't change what our forefathers put down on paper 215 years ago.

In 1913 the 16th amendment was voted in by skullduggery.

Below is the TEETH to what has help keep us a relatively free people.

There are two methods for amending the U.S. Constitution.

The first method is for a bill to pass both halves of the legislature, by a two-thirds majority in each. Once the bill has passed both houses, it goes on to the states. This is the route taken by all current amendments. Because of some long outstanding amendments, such as the 27th, Congress will normally put a time limit (typically seven years) for the bill to be approved as an amendment (for example, see the 21st and 22nd).

The second method prescribed is for a Constitutional Convention to be called by two-thirds of the legislatures of the States, and for that Convention to propose one or more amendments. These amendments are then sent to the states to be approved by three-fourths of the legislatures or conventions. This route has never been taken, and there is discussion in political science circles about just how such a convention would be convened, and what kind of changes it would bring about.

Regardless of which of the two proposal routes is taken, the amendment must be approved by three-fourths of states. The amendment as passed may specify whether the bill must be passed by the state legislatures or by a state convention. See the Ratification Convention Page for a discussion of the make up of a convention. Amendments are sent to the legislatures of the states by default. Only one amendment, the 21st, specified a convention.

It is interesting to note that at no point does the President have a role in the formal amendment process (though he would be free

BTW...Thank you BigFinFan you are a man after my own heart.

P4E
05-26-2004, 07:53 PM
I will post the answers tomorrow in order to give more peopel a chance to Test their knowledge.

Very Good P4E

I get to stay?

themole
05-26-2004, 08:25 PM
I get to stay?


Might as well stay P4E, looks like we are the only ones interested. As I stated in another thread here in the lounge, to many of these Sth Fl. People just aren't interested.... not only in the Dolphins but politics either. Generation X jerk wads!

Move the Dolphins to Orlando.

TerryTate
05-26-2004, 09:21 PM
Might as well stay P4E, looks like we are the only ones interested. As I stated in another thread here in the lounge, to many of these Sth Fl. People just aren't interested.... not only in the Dolphins but politics either. Generation X jerk wads!

Move the Dolphins to Orlando.

Im a generation Xer that would love to have the Dolphins move to Orlando! :)

iceblizzard69
05-26-2004, 10:21 PM
Im a generation Xer that would love to have the Dolphins move to Orlando! :)

I hope you're joking. :shakeno: The Dolphins are Miami's team. I'm not even from Miami and I would be very pissed if they moved, but I know that will never happen. :)

BigFinFan
05-26-2004, 11:57 PM
One of my favorite quotes regarding the Constitution is from the movie With Honors:

Simon Wilder: You asked a question, sir. Let me answer it. The genius of the constitution is that it can always be changed. The genius of the constitution is that it makes no permanent rule other than its faith in the wisdom of ordinary people to govern themselves.

Mr. Picannon: The faith in the wisdom of ordinary people is exactly what makes the Constitution incomplete and crude.

Simon: Crude? No, sir. Our founding parents were pompous middle-aged white farmers, but they were also great men, because they knew one thing that all great men should know: that they didn't know everything. They knew they were going to make mistakes, but they made sure to leave a way to correct them. They didn't think of themselves as leaders. They wanted a government of citizens, not royalty. A government of listeners, not lecturers. A government that could change not stand still. The president isn't an elected king, no matter how many bombs he can drop, because the crude Constitution doesn't trust him. He's a servant of the people. He's a bum. Ok, Mr. Picannon? He's just a bum. The only bliss that he's searching for is freedom and justice.

BigFinFan
05-27-2004, 12:27 PM
Here are the answers!

1. 26
2. The Bill of Rights
3. Executive, Legislative, and Judicial
4. Six years
5. Two Years
6. Freedom of religion, speech, the press; right to peaceful assembly, and to petition the government for redress of grievance.
7. 13
8. Thomas Jefferson
9. 100
10. 435 (voting members)

genx23
05-27-2004, 02:02 PM
If you don't know at least 8 of those, you should have never made it past 6th grade.

I only got 7...then again, I'm Canadian. :D

themole
05-27-2004, 04:49 PM
I hope you're joking. :shakeno: The Dolphins are Miami's team. I'm not even from Miami and I would be very pissed if they moved, but I know that will never happen. :)

I'll bet you the fans of the Browns, Colts, Cardinals,Rams, Raiders and Oilers all said the same thing. The Bolts are San Deigos team, the owners are doing their best to leave there. The Vikings are Minnesotas team, the owner is doing his darnest to leave there also. If Wayne H. were to visit this board to get an idea of how the fan base in Miami is feeling about his team....he would have packed his Dolphins moving van and Bolted for Orlando years ago. But really all he has to do is read Miami's local mullet wrappers to get a feel for local opinion. As the years wear on you, you'll learn to "Never say Never".
Orlando Dolphins...Orlando Dolphins...Orlando Dolphins all the way! :eek:

BigFinFan
05-27-2004, 05:51 PM
I'll bet you the fans of the Browns, Colts, Cardinals,Rams, Raiders and Oilers all said the same thing. The Bolts are San Deigos team, the owners are doing their best to leave there. The Vikings are Minnesotas team, the owner is doing his darnest to leave there also. If Wayne H. were to visit this board to get an idea of how the fan base in Miami is feeling about his team....he would have packed his Dolphins moving van and Bolted for Orlando years ago. But really all he has to do is read Miami's local mullet wrappers to get a feel for local opinion. As the years wear on you, you'll learn to "Never say Never".
Orlando Dolphins...Orlando Dolphins...Orlando Dolphins all the way! :eek:

Two words that can get you into serious trouble:

ALWAYS and NEVER

themole
05-27-2004, 06:17 PM
BigFinFan here is one of my favorites.

Why I am An American

I am an American because I believe in a government of laws and not men, and in an national allegiance to high principle and lofty ideal instead of to a personal sovereign.

I am an American because I believe in a government with three distinct, separate branches, each mutually independent of the other, with no power of delagation or appropriation of rights or powers by any one to or from any other.

I am an American because I believe government must derive its " just powers from the consent of the governed" and that branches of government and officers shall have such powers and such only as shall be given by the people; because I believe that the assumption by branches of government or by officers of rights or powers not specifically conferred upon them is usurpation; and because impeachment or other trial lies against any officer who so usurps rights or powers not specifically conferred.

I am an American because I believe in the greatest possible measure of self government and because I believe in a federal system of government which keeps local affairs in the hands of local governments.

I am an American because I believe in the bill of rights which places wholly beyond the reach of lawful government certain matters affecting " life, liberty, and the persuit of happiness," and specifically the right of freedom of conscience and worship, the right of free speech and a free press, the right peaceably to assemble and petition government, and the right to gain and hold property without molestation except by due process of law.

I am an American because under our form of government the people of the United States have made a progress never before made by any other people in the world in an equal time during the whole period of recorded history.

I am an American because standards of life and of living of the entire American people are far beyond those enjoyed by any other people in any other part of the world, either now or at any other time, which is a living testimony and evidence of the kindly beneficence of our free institutions.

I am an American because this nation has no scheme or plan of conquest, because it has a respect for the rights of other peoples and of other nations, because it promotes justice and honor in the relationships with other nations, because it loves the ways of peace as against war, as shown by the repeated peaceful adjustment of its own international disputes, because it has conquered the land greed that so afflicts the nations of the world, as demonstrated in Cuba and the Phillippines.

I am an American because my country abolished slavery after it had become deep-rooted and because men still are free to work, and are secur in the enjoyment of the products of their labor.

I am an American because I firmly and ernastly believe that the Constitution is an inspired document designed by our maker to set up a government which would make sure and secure the rights set forth in the Bill of Rights, and particulary the right of freedom of conscience and worship.

I am an American because I believe that the destiny of America is to be the abiding place of liberty and free institutions, and that its own practice and enjoyment of these blessings shall be to the world a becon light light which shall radiate its influence by peaceful means to the uttermost parts of the world, to the uplifting of humanity.

This is a reprint from Congressional Record, June 11, 1940.

A little lengthy but still true.

WeVie
05-27-2004, 10:04 PM
You are an American beacause you were born here.

themole
05-27-2004, 10:18 PM
You are an American beacause you were born here.

Actually....I have a choice.

iceblizzard69
05-28-2004, 10:04 AM
You are an American beacause you were born here.

Exactly. There are two ways to become an American:

1. Being born in the USA. If you are born here, you become a US citizen.
2. Becoming a US citizen later in life. If you are not born here, you can still become an American by becoming an American citizen. For example, soccer player Freddy Adu was born in Ghana, but he moved here and became an American citizen, so he is an American.

You don't have to like those running the government to be an American. Agreeing with our laws doesn't make you more of an American, and not agreeing with them doesn't make you less of an American. I love this country and would never want to live anywhere else, but I don't agree with everything our government does, and just because I don't agree with everything they do doesn't mean that I am less of an American.

themole
05-28-2004, 04:23 PM
Exactly. There are two ways to become an American:

1. Being born in the USA. If you are born here, you become a US citizen.
2. Becoming a US citizen later in life. If you are not born here, you can still become an American by becoming an American citizen. For example, soccer player Freddy Adu was born in Ghana, but he moved here and became an American citizen, so he is an American.

You don't have to like those running the government to be an American. Agreeing with our laws doesn't make you more of an American, and not agreeing with them doesn't make you less of an American. I love this country and would never want to live anywhere else, but I don't agree with everything our government does, and just because I don't agree with everything they do doesn't mean that I am less of an American.


So what does that have to do with what I posted? Or, are you just being a contrary little snot? :fire:

BigFinFan
05-28-2004, 05:51 PM
The main point of the post is being missed:

Many of us take for granted the freedoms gained for us two centuries ago.

Foreigners striving for citizenship in our nation tend to know much more about the nature of our republic than most of the people born in the United States. They have to; part of the road to U.S. citizenship involves a test.

BigFinFan
05-28-2004, 05:55 PM
I
I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.

II
I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist.

III
If I am captured, I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.

IV
If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information nor take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way.

V
When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give name, rank, service number, and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause.

VI
I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

themole
05-28-2004, 06:07 PM
The main point of the post is being missed:

Many of us take for granted the freedoms gained for us two centuries ago.

Foreigners striving for citizenship in our nation tend to know much more about the nature of our republic than most of the people born in the United States. They have to; part of the road to U.S. citizenship involves a test.

I could not agree with you more BigFinFan.

It is EVERY citizens obligation to be INFORMED and INVOLVED! If all would participate we would have a much more responsive government. I can't speak for the youth of today, but I'd like to think that what they are ignorant of "book wise" they make up for by subconsciously having liberty instilled in ther hearts by example.

themole
05-28-2004, 06:18 PM
I
I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.

II
I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist.

III
If I am captured, I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.

IV
If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information nor take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way.

V
When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give name, rank, service number, and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause.

VI
I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

I thought that IV & V had been revisited? Perhaps, V is the revised version of the code.

It has been over thirty years since I had to snap to and respond to such matters.

iceblizzard69
05-28-2004, 07:07 PM
So what does that have to do with what I posted? Or, are you just being a contrary little snot? :fire:

My post says what I think an American is, and I believe an American is someone who is a US citizen. There's nothing else to it. I actually agreed with a lot of the things said in "Why I am an American," I just don't think that you are an American because you believe those things.

JPhinfan86
06-02-2004, 09:37 AM
Assuming P4E is right, I got 4 right. The others im not sure about.