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View Full Version : This is very typical of the Breck Girl.



Section126
07-06-2004, 07:13 PM
So now John Edwards is taking credit for the Patients Bill of Rights that he put his name on in August of 2001.....

What this scumbag does not say is that PRESIDENT BUSH pushed that particular bill and got a vast majority of the senate and House to pass the bill. It was GWB's bill...Not the Breck Girl's.

He just started, and his first thing out the box is an outright lie.

Clumpy
07-07-2004, 02:11 AM
Why is John Edwards a scumbag? :shakeno:

ohall
07-07-2004, 09:07 AM
Why is John Edwards a scumbag? :shakeno:

He's a lawyer that took 30% of the victims $ for himself. Lawyers like him are the main reason why medical care costs are so high.

Get it?

Oliver...

Pink_Dove
07-07-2004, 10:41 AM
[/QUOTE]He's a lawyer that took 30% of the victims $ for himself. Lawyers like him are the main reason why medical care costs are so high.

Get it?

Oliver...[QUOTE]

I might be wrong but isn't the 30% dictated by the bar...I'm not sure of the rules in terms of medical costs but for example when it comes to divorce, the bar states that a lawyer takes a certain percentage for himself...I believe it's the same for medical costs, I doubt Edwards was the only one who did it or who started it...

ohall
07-07-2004, 10:54 AM
He's a lawyer that took 30% of the victims $ for himself. Lawyers like him are the main reason why medical care costs are so high.

Get it?

Oliver...


I might be wrong but isn't the 30% dictated by the bar...I'm not sure of the rules in terms of medical costs but for example when it comes to divorce, the bar states that a lawyer takes a certain percentage for himself...I believe it's the same for medical costs, I doubt Edwards was the only one who did it or who started it...

Of course, he's not any worse than the rest of them, and I never said he was the only one.

From what I understand he quit making a living this way when his 1st son died. Of course he could stop working because he was now a multi-millionaire.

Oliver...

Clumpy
07-07-2004, 11:04 AM
I work in health care and legal expenses are not the main reason medical costs are so high. Many factors, but one of the most important reasons is the inefficiency built into the system. Institutional politics (i.e. emergency room gets what they want whenever they want it regardless of medical necessity and how much of a burden it places on other staff) plays a huge role in that inefficiency that drives up variable costs. I recommended changing a variable cost into a fixed cost: instead of issuing blood products in specially made zip-lock bags, I suggested using the same rubbermaid plastic containers that we use to transport blood specimens between hospitals for testing. This alone, system-wide (5 hospitals), would have saved nearly $25,000/yr and that is only 1 supply item. Nursing services said no because they felt that it was too much of a burden on the nurses and aides to carry the container :shakeno:

Do malpractice suits impact health care costs? Of course, but not as much as the many more examples I can describe

ohall
07-07-2004, 11:32 AM
I work in health care and legal expenses are not the main reason medical costs are so high. Many factors, but one of the most important reasons is the inefficiency built into the system. Institutional politics (i.e. emergency room gets what they want whenever they want it regardless of medical necessity and how much of a burden it places on other staff) plays a huge role in that inefficiency that drives up variable costs. I recommended changing a variable cost into a fixed cost: instead of issuing blood products in specially made zip-lock bags, I suggested using the same rubbermaid plastic containers that we use to transport blood specimens between hospitals for testing. This alone, system-wide (5 hospitals), would have saved nearly $25,000/yr and that is only 1 supply item. Nursing services said no because they felt that it was too much of a burden on the nurses and aides to carry the container :shakeno:

Do malpractice suits impact health care costs? Of course, but not as much as the many more examples I can describe

Some how I think if the REP's had picked a trial lawyer for President or for VP you'd be singing a different tune Clump.

Most ppl understand lawyers are the main reason medical care has gone through the roof. Doctors have to carry crazy amounts of insurance to cover their azz from those sharks.

Oliver...

PhinPhan1227
07-07-2004, 11:35 AM
He's a lawyer that took 30% of the victims $ for himself. Lawyers like him are the main reason why medical care costs are so high.

Get it?

Oliver...


I might be wrong but isn't the 30% dictated by the bar...I'm not sure of the rules in terms of medical costs but for example when it comes to divorce, the bar states that a lawyer takes a certain percentage for himself...I believe it's the same for medical costs, I doubt Edwards was the only one who did it or who started it...


I don't believe that's accurate. If it was, than lawyers couldn't do Pro-Bono work. Further, some lawyers charge more than 30%, so it's obviously not a set in stone figure. 30% is just an industry standard.

Clumpy
07-07-2004, 11:39 AM
Some how I think if the REP's had picked a trial lawyer for President or for VP you'd be singing a different tune Clump.

Most ppl understand lawyers are the main reason medical care has gone through the roof. Doctors have to carry crazy amounts of insurance to cover their azz from those sharks.

Oliver...


Malpractice premiums are just like any other insurance, the more mistakes, the higher the premiums. Also, the more the mistakes, the more "CYA" a doctor gets and he/she then shows no restraint on test ordering, blood transfusion utilization, etc.

Another example: Utilization of blood products is a killer on the budget. Our hospital system lost 6 figures (rumor was nearly $750,000) last year on unneeded transfusions and expired products (pooled platelets are good for only 4 hrs and heart surgeons are infamous for ordering, which means I must pool them, and then not using.....that's $1,000 gone wasted)

PhinPhan1227
07-07-2004, 11:39 AM
I work in health care and legal expenses are not the main reason medical costs are so high. Many factors, but one of the most important reasons is the inefficiency built into the system. Institutional politics (i.e. emergency room gets what they want whenever they want it regardless of medical necessity and how much of a burden it places on other staff) plays a huge role in that inefficiency that drives up variable costs. I recommended changing a variable cost into a fixed cost: instead of issuing blood products in specially made zip-lock bags, I suggested using the same rubbermaid plastic containers that we use to transport blood specimens between hospitals for testing. This alone, system-wide (5 hospitals), would have saved nearly $25,000/yr and that is only 1 supply item. Nursing services said no because they felt that it was too much of a burden on the nurses and aides to carry the container :shakeno:

Do malpractice suits impact health care costs? Of course, but not as much as the many more examples I can describe

Maybe not for an institution like a hospital, but for private practices? There are some specialties that are virtually disapearing in this country because the cost of malpractice insurance is so vastly out of proportion to the fee's they can charge for some common procedures.

Clumpy
07-07-2004, 11:41 AM
As to the first part, I disagree. I do not disparage trial lawyers. I do believe that fees should be capped but not necessary awards to victims

Clumpy
07-07-2004, 11:41 AM
Maybe not for an institution like a hospital, but for private practices? There are some specialties that are virtually disapearing in this country because the cost of malpractice insurance is so vastly out of proportion to the fee's they can charge for some common procedures.

OB/Gyn is one of them

PhinPhan1227
07-07-2004, 11:55 AM
OB/Gyn is one of them

Exactly!!! The only reason I know this is because our son was born a year ago and it's still fresh in my mind how limited our choices of OB's were for prenatal care.

Clumpy
07-07-2004, 12:22 PM
Exactly!!! The only reason I know this is because our son was born a year ago and it's still fresh in my mind how limited our choices of OB's were for prenatal care.


Some specialties are cyclical

PhinPhan1227
07-07-2004, 12:24 PM
Some specialties are cyclical

Lol...last time I checked, birth rates haven't gone down recently.

Clumpy
07-07-2004, 11:59 PM
Lol...last time I checked, birth rates haven't gone down recently.


That's true, but medical schools and medical trends create cyclical patterns in the number of doctorsa in each specialty. I didn't get a grad degree in Health Care economics for nothing

PhinPhan1227
07-08-2004, 12:16 PM
That's true, but medical schools and medical trends create cyclical patterns in the number of doctorsa in each specialty. I didn't get a grad degree in Health Care economics for nothing


I'm sure that's true, but what causes those trends? If a med student is deciding on a specialty and hears how OB/GYNS are paying out more in MedMAl than they are making in fees...think that might impact the decision?

themole
07-08-2004, 12:30 PM
I work in health care and legal expenses are not the main reason medical costs are so high. Many factors, but one of the most important reasons is the inefficiency built into the system. Institutional politics (i.e. emergency room gets what they want whenever they want it regardless of medical necessity and how much of a burden it places on other staff) plays a huge role in that inefficiency that drives up variable costs. I recommended changing a variable cost into a fixed cost: instead of issuing blood products in specially made zip-lock bags, I suggested using the same rubbermaid plastic containers that we use to transport blood specimens between hospitals for testing. This alone, system-wide (5 hospitals), would have saved nearly $25,000/yr and that is only 1 supply item. Nursing services said no because they felt that it was too much of a burden on the nurses and aides to carry the container :shakeno:

Do malpractice suits impact health care costs? Of course, but not as much as the many more examples I can describe

Clumpy...in pursuit of the "Demming". :D

themole
07-08-2004, 12:35 PM
I do believe that fees should be capped but not necessary awards to victims


I'm with ya on that one. :up:

Clumpy
07-09-2004, 12:16 AM
I'm sure that's true, but what causes those trends? If a med student is deciding on a specialty and hears how OB/GYNS are paying out more in MedMAl than they are making in fees...think that might impact the decision?

Availability of residency programs is a huge factor. If a med student wants to do his or her residency in a particular specialty, they may be prevented due to limited availablity. I do know for a fact that locally.

PhinPhan1227
07-09-2004, 11:34 AM
Availability of residency programs is a huge factor. If a med student wants to do his or her residency in a particular specialty, they may be prevented due to limited availablity. I do know for a fact that locally.


What limits the availability? Sticking with OB/GYN, what would limit the availability of residency programs in that field? Considering that it's getting harder and harder to find practitioners, I can't imagine it's because of a glut of current residents filling all the available slots.

Clumpy
07-21-2004, 02:10 AM
He's a lawyer that took 30% of the victims $ for himself. Lawyers like him are the main reason why medical care costs are so high.

Get it?

Oliver...

Of course, he's not any worse than the rest of them, and I never said he was the only one.

From what I understand he quit making a living this way when his 1st son died. Of course he could stop working because he was now a multi-millionaire.

Oliver...


I believe reading what's on this link will refute the misinformation about health care costs and trial lawyers

http://www.americanprogress.org/site/pp.asp?c=biJRJ8OVF&b=6228