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Orange FinFan
06-16-2005, 05:44 PM
I'm trying to break into coaching, but am not exactly sure of what I need todo. I currently coach my sons soccer team ( by default ) and I'm planning on coaching football in the fall. What I what to know is about plays, techniques, especially for postions I nevered played and where I can info about things like that. So I was wondering if any of you would be able to help me out. I appericate it.

SCall13
06-16-2005, 06:42 PM
I'm trying to break into coaching, but am not exactly sure of what I need todo. I currently coach my sons soccer team ( by default ) and I'm planning on coaching football in the fall. What I what to know is about plays, techniques, especially for postions I nevered played and where I can info about things like that. So I was wondering if any of you would be able to help me out. I appericate it.



I have been coaching Pop Warner football for 7 years. I'm about to enter my 8th season. I have coached different age levels. I have been asked to help coach Middle School football. But the pay isn't very much and definetly not enough to quit my regular job for and I also enjoy the kids at the Pop Warner level too much to give it up. If you have any questions, ask away....

Orange FinFan
06-16-2005, 06:53 PM
Did you play football? I never played on the lines, so I dont know anything about the stances and things of the nature. At what age are children able to really start focusing on the techinques. Do you make your own plays? Do you get paid? Ever thought about coaching for a career? Thats it for now, I appericate your response.

FinsNYanksFan13
06-16-2005, 07:59 PM
The hardest thing I learned as a player was gap numbers and assignments. Kids know how to run, catch, throw, ect. but they don't know the intricacies (sp) and little things that go into the game. That's the toughest part, really teaching the kids the game because most kids think it's run, throw, catch, tackle, and that's it. Good luck man!

Prime
06-16-2005, 09:27 PM
I am an assistant coach for my High School football team. Pretty much what i did was i went up to the coaches and ask for a interview like things. So they gave me one and they liked what i had to say, and they wanted me to be an assistant and i accepted it. I am hoping to be a coach to the college i will be going to.

SCall13
06-16-2005, 09:42 PM
Did you play football? I never played on the lines, so I dont know anything about the stances and things of the nature. At what age are children able to really start focusing on the techinques. Do you make your own plays? Do you get paid? Ever thought about coaching for a career? Thats it for now, I appericate your response.


I Played football from pop warner to college to semi pro. Never played line. I played QB. That is me in my avatar. THe youngest group, the Mitey Mites, can learn anything the Pee Wees or Midgets do. It's a question of how difficult it is to learn it. THe idea is to make as simple for them to understand as possible. Your biggest challenge with the younger ones is keeping thier attention so yell and scream and let them know that you and the other coaches will be respected or their will be consequences: Laps, Up/Downs, Jump Squats, Hill Drills...anything that they hate would be consequences. THis builds discipline and builds character. Let them know you mean business early on. Do not give them an inch.
Blocking techniques can be taught at any level. Let me start by saying that the WRONG way to teach a O-lineman is to simply try to over power his opponent. THat is wrong and all you do at that point, at best, is creat a stalemate. Stalemates don't open holes. Always remember that the linemens heads HAVE to be on the side of the defender that the runner is going to. HE will use this to achieve leverage, allow a small lane to open and push the player away from the play. (THat's basically that in a nutshell). The most effective blocks are the ones the defense don't see coming: Crack back blocks by your recievers are devastating. The DE is the prime target for this block and it;s usually thrown on a sweep. When the DE goes into the backfield, the slot Reciever will meet him with nasty intentions. BUT HE MUST MAKE SURE HIS HEAD IS IN FRONT OF THE DEFENDER. My teams always use this block well and it intimidates the ends and ends up opening some huge sweeps for us. It also helps open off tackle traps. Which is the next block. TRAPS. Trap blocking effectively at this age level can open some incredible holes that can send your back the distance. Your outside lineman blocks down then your guard will come in behind the tackles down block and seal the end lineman out. If you do this with a lead blocker out of the back field and he can seal the middle LB away from the play and you WR or slot can get to the safety, HUGE GAIN baby.
One more block...another one you don't see coming ios the peel back block. A player is moving away but with the flow of the play then peels back and crashes a pursuing pplayer. Devasting block that can take a players heart right out of the game.

I do not get paid to do it. NOT a dime. In fact, I pay $75 a year to be a member of the organization. There are some places that will pay their coaches but you have to climb the ladder to be a paid coach. I wouldn't take the money even if our organization offered it.


BY the way. If anyone is in the Charlotte area and has Children, Ricky Manning Jr. is doing a one day camp here on July 25th. If you want more info, PM me.

SCall13
06-16-2005, 09:43 PM
The hardest thing I learned as a player was gap numbers and assignments. Kids know how to run, catch, throw, ect. but they don't know the intricacies (sp) and little things that go into the game. That's the toughest part, really teaching the kids the game because most kids think it's run, throw, catch, tackle, and that's it. Good luck man!


Yeah and they all come in thinking they are all QBs and WRs and RBs. LOL...when most of them are LINEMEN!!

Orange FinFan
06-17-2005, 09:56 AM
I really appericate it. I will try to use some of those blocks. I cant wait till I can get in there and really start working with the kids. What do you guys suggest for plays? Did you create your own or did you have some sort of reference to go off of? I will be coaching 6 and 7 yr olds. Coaching soccer I think helps a little because it gives me the opp to work with kids and kind of get a feel for how its going to be. You said to yell and scream to keep the kids attention....Do the childrens parents attend practice? Have you ever had confrontations with any of them in regards to the yelling? Thanks again

SCall13
06-17-2005, 12:31 PM
I really appericate it. I will try to use some of those blocks. I cant wait till I can get in there and really start working with the kids. What do you guys suggest for plays? Did you create your own or did you have some sort of reference to go off of? I will be coaching 6 and 7 yr olds. Coaching soccer I think helps a little because it gives me the opp to work with kids and kind of get a feel for how its going to be. You said to yell and scream to keep the kids attention....Do the childrens parents attend practice? Have you ever had confrontations with any of them in regards to the yelling? Thanks again


Parents are harder to deal with than the kids most of the time. I have had plenty of confrontations with parents. Believe me, you'll get used to it. A little advice: Every year, the first day of practice, I give all of the parents a letter that tells them what is expected from the kids and what to expect from myself. I do tell them that football is a rough sport and that their children's focus is very important - and to keep them focused, it takes lots of yelling. Be sure to let them know you have no intentions of belittling any children, but you will do whatever is necassary to be sure they are attentive. Football is too physical for a child not to be completely focused.
As far as plays: WOW, there are just so many ways to go. I run mulit-formations. I've done it form Mitey-Mites all the way up. I think it's a good idea to have mulitple sets just to keep the defense guessing and off balance-especially at this age. MORE ADVICE: Use lots of misdirection and reverses and hammer the ball off-tackle. If you open the hole off tackle and seal the Outside LB inside, you are ususually in for a big gain. The misdirection and reverses are good because at this age level, the kids are typical undisciplined and are easy to get out of position, thus allowing for more big gains and TDs. Take this advice to the defensive side too and really hammer it in the kids heads to know and perform their assignments because it's easy to get burned if they don't do their jobs. For example: If your Defensive ends crash and don't contain, they will get smoked wide on sweeps and reverses. Your defensive ends and corners will be key to stopping the big gains so they HAVE to be good tacklers and discplined/smart players. Your ends MUST take on the blocks and not back peddle. They need to take on the blocker at the shoulder deepest to the backfield to force the ball carrier to turn inside to the pursuit. If the ball carrier gets around your defensive end, your last man to stop him will be the corner. If he doesn't tackle him, then you better hope your outside LB and safeties are there to make the stop.
Another word of advice: Kids are sponges. Don't let their ages fool you. They can learn alot. You just have to be patient and teach. It isn't all about yelling. It's about being detailed and making sure each kid understands his responsibilties on each play.
Another thing: After the initial 2 weeks of conditioning that is usually mandatory, don't waste 30 minutes of practice time exercising. Just running around in practice with all that equipment on will keep the kids in shape. You need to spend as much time as possible on DETAILS. If the kids are talking, send them on laps or give them grass drills or roadwork. Tell them that their two choice are either to listen and become good football players or not pay attention and get in really good shape by running laps and doing grass drills. You'll find that they will decide on being good football players. The boys hate laps! OBVIOUSLY. :D
Make sure to teach good tackling technique. kids have a tendency to want to drop to thier knees and tackle or dive or arm tackle. You have to break them of these habits EARLY.

Orange FinFan
06-17-2005, 12:48 PM
This is all really good information. How did you get your start in coaching? I just love football and like most people on this forum are too old to play anymore(work), so I figured I would coach and it gives me the opp to spend time with my son. I thought that the parents were going to be the difficult ones, so I like the idea of giving them a letter at the beginning of the season. Do you have any children that you coached? How did you deal with being questioned about favoritism if you did? How living thru the children and how to deal with that. Thanks for taking the time to help me out.

SCall13
06-17-2005, 04:13 PM
This is all really good information. How did you get your start in coaching? I just love football and like most people on this forum are too old to play anymore(work), so I figured I would coach and it gives me the opp to spend time with my son. I thought that the parents were going to be the difficult ones, so I like the idea of giving them a letter at the beginning of the season. Do you have any children that you coached? How did you deal with being questioned about favoritism if you did? How living thru the children and how to deal with that. Thanks for taking the time to help me out.


I got started coaching by contacting the local Recreation Dept. and finding out who was over the football program. Talked to our football commisioner, and was assigned as head coach of the Mitey Mites. I was like, "Geez throw to the wolves so quickly?" But it turned out great. The commissioner actually told me I should only run between 6 and 8 plays at the Mitey Mite level and I was a little surprised at how few he suggested. Well, by the 5th game of the season, my Mitey Mites were running 28 plays. The following year I had them at over 35. My third and final year at the Mitey Mites we had over 50 plays. Mind you, these included "I" formation plays which are pretty basic and the best way to teach the kids the holes and back numers. For example: Tailback (#3) through the 2 hole. Would be a "32 Lead" with the FB leading through the hole. They get comfortable with what they are doing with the "I" Formation then you can start implementing other formations. Don't take a long time teaching the "I". They should pick it up quickly and those that don't will pcik up the rest of their understanding as you go. The ones who will be starting will be the ones who pick it up because it's usually the smarter, most athletic ones that learn the fastest because they are simply more interested.

As for having a child play: No, I haven't. I have a son who is 5 so he wasn't even born yet when I started coaching. He played flag football this past year. That's all they have for 5 year olds here. I helped coach his team, but didn't get any complaints about favoritism. I have had a nephew play for me. He was my QB for a few years. I didn't get any favoritism complaints because he was awesome. He did have an advantage. Before he ever even played, I was working with him and teaching him all the plays. So when he started playing, he was MORE than ready and very good. We had a great passing attack. His first year, we passed for more yards than any team in organization ever had and every year we beat our old record. I like to pass, but you definetly have to have the right personnel. It's helpful when the group has played a few years together.
Another play you can run (I just thought of this) is the swing pass. Run a reciever deep from whatever side you choose to. Have your QB drop and look down field at the streaking reciever. Have your half back run a swing route. IT is almost always open and will net you some huge gains. Typically when you complete a swing pass, the last line of defense is the safety because the corner went with the reciever and the LBs are licking thier chops to sack the QB so they bum rush into the backfield. So you can see why it can be such a big play even though it's really simple. The KEY is making sure the QB stares down the reciever who is streaking. **NOTE** If you can get your QB to read what the corner does, you could actually let him have an option to throw to the reciever. Alot of times, if not most of the time, at a young age the corners are slow to react to the reciever taking off and he will be open. But your QB has to have the arm to get it to him-obviously. We've gianed some huge chunks that way.
Anyway, i could go on and on and on but I'll stop babbling. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. i love to talk X's and O's.

Orange FinFan
06-17-2005, 04:29 PM
Do you plan on moving up thru the ranks, as far as coaching goes? I think that I'll do okay, I think that I'm just a little too anxious to start. But I want to make sure that the kids really learn the fundmentals of football. Do you make most of your own plays? I have been trying to come up with my own, but sometimes I not that creative. Do you run alot of tricks plays? How do you teach the kids the rules of the game, holding etc.? Is there something that you have found that works for you.

SCall13
06-17-2005, 06:01 PM
Do you plan on moving up thru the ranks, as far as coaching goes? I think that I'll do okay, I think that I'm just a little too anxious to start. But I want to make sure that the kids really learn the fundmentals of football. Do you make most of your own plays? I have been trying to come up with my own, but sometimes I not that creative. Do you run alot of tricks plays? How do you teach the kids the rules of the game, holding etc.? Is there something that you have found that works for you.


I've been asked for three years in a row to coach Middle School. But the pay sucks and is definetly not worth quitting my job for which is what I'd have to do to be able to coach there. If I were offered a high school job, I might take it. But most schools prefer, and sometimes require, a coach to also be a teacher. So for now, I'll be sticking with Pop Warner. I love it with the young kids and honestly would prefer it. The cool thing is that alot of the kids I coached in my first year are in there 1st and second years of high school now. It's really cool to see them playing at that level and knowing I had a hand in their development. There is one kid in particular that I feel sure will be in the NFL. His name is Charles Johnson. To give you an example of how awesome this kid is: In his first year starting (Running Back) he ran for 2136 yards and 26 touchdown. In that same year he caught 27 psses for over 600 yards and 7 ouchdowns. He is a mini Barry Sanders. He is incredible. It's amazing to watch this boy run. The way he can change directions on a dime and not slow down a bit and leave people grasping for nothing but air and already be 5 to 10 yards down field.

I do make a lot of my own plays now.I started off, believe it or not, using a pared down offense like the one we ran when I was playing Semi-pro. I would recommend studying up on some plays, how they are designed and how the blocking scheme works for each play and get familiar with how all that works together. I say I make my own plays, but in reality any play you run is going to be, in some way, related to plays that are already used. BUt you can add your own little touches to them.
I do like to run trick plays. They are very effective in the Pop Warner level. Reverses are good. I run a play called "Wing Right-49 inside reverse" The wing is the 4 back. The FB is behind the QB and the tailback is offset left. The QB turns out left as the FB runs into the 3 hole. The QB continues to rotate 360 degrees. The TB runs to the right, holding his arms as if he's getting the ball. THis creates two fakes. The FB in the 3 gap and the TB taking it for a sweep around the right end. THe Wing man runs between the QB and the line of scrimmage. The QB completes his turn and hands the ball to the wing back who is running FULL THROTTLE around the end. Also the Left guard will pulls to the left. The FB fills the gap left by the guard. Make sure the FB knows that he is to lay the hammer on that poor defensive lineman oe LB when he fills the gap. The pulling guard takes on the defensive end, attacking the shoulder that is closest to the line and forcing him into the backfield. The Wing back explodes around the end and usually has a lot of room because your safety and LBs are usually follwoing the flow of the Tailback who went on the fake 38 sweep. Make sure to run the 38 sweep and 23 fullback dive out of this same formation to set up the inside reverse. I hope this made sense. Oh yeah, there is two tight ends in this set. You want your play side TE to seal the OLB inside. THis will be made easier for him because the LBs initial reactions is going to be to chase the sweep. When he realizes where the play is really going, the TE should be all over his @$$.

TEaching the kids the rules of the game is just a repitition thing. To keep them from holding, just constantly remind them to keep there hands inside of the defender. If his arms ever reach around the outside of the defender, whether he grabs him or not, he could and probably will be, called for holding. To teach them from jumping offsides and learn to pay attention to snap counts there are several things you can do. Of course, when you first start, you want to warn them a few times. After you've exhausted the warnings, make them do 10 pushups if they do it again. 15 after that, 20 after that. And so on. THey will learn to pay attention quick. ALso, at the end of practive we run wind sprints. I start off telling them they will run 3 times down and three times back. I tell them what to go on and call the Cadence. DOWN, SET, HUT...HUT. If they jump before the right count, they run the sprint, but it doesn't count. So they run and they still have 3 sprints up and 3 sprints down. They will start paying attention REAL quick. This also teaches teamwork and you will find out who your team leaders are because they will be the ones getting on to their teammates for jumping offsides.
There is some more info. Hope it helps...