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Clark Kent
08-07-2005, 12:20 AM
You know those things you didn't read in school. What kind of **** was that anyway? Pfft, Great Gatsby... **** him. I need some suggestions. I just finished "the Bible", and boy was it a mind blower. Really, if you're into fiction and suspense... OK, that might get offensive, and I'm just joking around. Actually, I finished reading "lifeguard" because it was a top seller (don't fall for that). It was really ****ty, and I recommend you ignore it all together.

Anyone read anything they really enjoyed? Any type of genre is fine, except books that suck (This includes Harry Potter). Please, none of those. Oh, and something cheap... I don't want to spend 20 bucks. Maybe something a little older, that's sold at wal-mart... for $5. You get the point.

I was thinking about "The Five People You Meet in Heaven" as it is as quicker read (don't suggest something "easy" for the sake of it being easy. I can read believe it or not...). Some people really like it, others don't. It has some philosophical bull**** and what have you (so I hear).

Maybe Ann Coulter's book. She's a narcissistic twit and I love her for it. She's always good for a laugh. I think her newest book is "how to speak to a liberal if you must."

Suggest away (give a little synopsis if you have time).

NaboCane
08-07-2005, 12:27 AM
Try The Man Who Turned Into Himself, by David Ambrose. It's from about 10 years ago - but what a premise. Mind-blowing.

And don't **** around with the chain bookstores, dig around and find the independent used bookstores in your area - much more rewarding, and cheap-cheap way to read a lot.

Check this out, from a used bookstore online:
http://dogbert.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bx=off&sts=t&ds=30&bi=s&an=david+ambrose&tn=the+man+who+turned+into+himself&sortby=2

...with a 30-second effort, you can buy this book for $1 online; a lot of sellers have free shipping if you order more than a certain amount.

Have at it.

Clark Kent
08-07-2005, 12:53 AM
Try The Man Who Turned Into Himself, by David Ambrose. It's from about 10 years ago - but what a premise. Mind-blowing.

And don't **** around with the chain bookstores, dig around and find the independent used bookstores in your area - much more rewarding, and cheap-cheap way to read a lot.

Check this out, from a used bookstore online:
http://dogbert.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bx=off&sts=t&ds=30&bi=s&an=david+ambrose&tn=the+man+who+turned+into+himself&sortby=2

...with a 30-second effort, you can buy this book for $1 online; a lot of sellers have free shipping if you order more than a certain amount.

Have at it.Thanks for the site. I love things that cost $1. I wish everything did, in fact. Just checked out the back cover on Amazon, and it does sound pretty good. I think I'll buy it.

WeVie
08-07-2005, 12:56 AM
Well.........if you like fantasty and want to commit several months into an epic story I suggest you check out The Wheel Of Time". It Is a wonderful story but a very long one. So far there are ten books and one prequel and book eleven to come out in October. All of these books is one story. One starts where the other one stops. You cant' even call them sequels. Right now I am about 100 pages into book ten.

Vol&dolfan
08-07-2005, 12:57 AM
I always like the Deathlands series of books.

WeVie
08-07-2005, 01:10 AM
I was looking at some of them on amazon. Now that is alot of books!!!!

Alien
08-07-2005, 09:43 PM
ive replaced books... with playstation 2!!!

spydertl79
08-08-2005, 02:39 PM
Anything by Dan Brown

zephon
08-08-2005, 05:00 PM
Anything by Hermann Hesse (he's my favorite writer): try Siddartha or the Glass Bead Game (he won a pulitzer for that one) although he has many others those are the 1st two I'd start you off with. Siddartha is a shorter book (if you have time issues) where The Glass Bead Game is fairly long..He does a great job a characterizations, basically he fully developes all the characters in his books.

I also like W.Somerset Maugham....check out The Razor's Edge----he's another writer who developes his characters well. It's a farily short book dealiing with sef-introspection.

There you go. Let me know what you think if you end up reading any of them. .....Oh, heck....this is kinda important (especially if you only read one type of book) :) All the books I mentioned are FICTION.

NaboCane
08-08-2005, 05:03 PM
Anything by Hermann Hesse (he's my favorite writer): try Siddartha or the Glass Bead Game (he won a pulitzer for that one) although he has many others those are the 1st two I'd start you off with. Siddartha is a shorter book (if you have time issues) where The Glass Bead Game is fairly long..He does a great job a characterizations, basically he fully developes all the characters in his books.

I also like W.Somerset Maugham....check out The Razor's Edge----he's another writer who developes his characters well. It's a farily short book dealiing with sef-introspection.

There you go. Let me know what you think if you end up reading any of them. .....Oh, heck....this is kinda important (especially if you only read one type of book) :) All the books I mentioned are FICTION.

:) One of my all-time favorites. Brilliant piece of work.

zephon
08-08-2005, 05:59 PM
:) One of my all-time favorites. Brilliant piece of work.


Is Try The Man Who Turned Into Himself along those lines...perhaps as something I would like?


You know, if that is one of your all time favorites...you'll really enjoy Hesse. Siddartha is likely my all time favorites...it's one of the few books I've kept over the years (I nomally donate a book after reading it a few times ) and The Glass Bead Game, because I just finished it for the 1st time about 2 weeks ago, seems like it'll be right up there, in other words, I'll actually keep the thing and look for a hardback.

other Hesse books to look into are Demian and Damon and Steppenwolf (another on the was highly acclaimed for). He also has a book of called Assorted Fairy Tales that I've only just cracked the spine on. It's ineresting and not your typical children type shot stories.

Another great book (well, its a translation of the priciple texts) is The Upanishads as translated from the orginal Sanskit by Swami Prabhavananda and Fredrick Manchester. If that sounds familiar to you, it should. I 1st heard reference to it in The Razor's Edge, looked it up a number of years ago and found this consise versioin for $5 in softback. It's also small and easy to carry around, jamming into a back pocket if needed. If you've never read it or any form of The Upanishads....IT IS A MUST for anyone who found The Razor's Edge even slightly good.

Happy Reading.

finataxia24
08-08-2005, 07:24 PM
The great shark hunt


by Hunter S Thompson


http://www.finheaven.com/images/imported/2005/08/050807_rickwilliams_hmedhmedium-1.jpg


GAME TIME

he has something to prove everytime he walks on the field...

NaboCane
08-08-2005, 08:33 PM
Is Try The Man Who Turned Into Himself along those lines...perhaps as something I would like?


You know, if that is one of your all time favorites...you'll really enjoy Hesse. Siddartha is likely my all time favorites...it's one of the few books I've kept over the years (I nomally donate a book after reading it a few times ) and The Glass Bead Game, because I just finished it for the 1st time about 2 weeks ago, seems like it'll be right up there, in other words, I'll actually keep the thing and look for a hardback.

other Hesse books to look into are Demian and Damon and Steppenwolf (another on the was highly acclaimed for). He also has a book of called Assorted Fairy Tales that I've only just cracked the spine on. It's ineresting and not your typical children type shot stories.

Another great book (well, its a translation of the priciple texts) is The Upanishads as translated from the orginal Sanskit by Swami Prabhavananda and Fredrick Manchester. If that sounds familiar to you, it should. I 1st heard reference to it in The Razor's Edge, looked it up a number of years ago and found this consise versioin for $5 in softback. It's also small and easy to carry around, jamming into a back pocket if needed. If you've never read it or any form of The Upanishads....IT IS A MUST for anyone who found The Razor's Edge even slightly good.

Happy Reading.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0312131194/qid=1123547585/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3848037-0334328?v=glance&s=books

see what you think

ABrownLamp
08-08-2005, 09:40 PM
Rule of the Bone by Russell Banks

The only book I ever liked. Won lots of awards in the mid nineties. A modern day Catcher in tthe Rye...which means it is a lot more graphic.

NaboCane
08-08-2005, 10:31 PM
Is Try The Man Who Turned Into Himself along those lines...perhaps as something I would like?


You know, if that is one of your all time favorites...you'll really enjoy Hesse. Siddartha is likely my all time favorites...it's one of the few books I've kept over the years (I nomally donate a book after reading it a few times ) and The Glass Bead Game, because I just finished it for the 1st time about 2 weeks ago, seems like it'll be right up there, in other words, I'll actually keep the thing and look for a hardback.

other Hesse books to look into are Demian and Damon and Steppenwolf (another on the was highly acclaimed for). He also has a book of called Assorted Fairy Tales that I've only just cracked the spine on. It's ineresting and not your typical children type shot stories.

Another great book (well, its a translation of the priciple texts) is The Upanishads as translated from the orginal Sanskit by Swami Prabhavananda and Fredrick Manchester. If that sounds familiar to you, it should. I 1st heard reference to it in The Razor's Edge, looked it up a number of years ago and found this consise versioin for $5 in softback. It's also small and easy to carry around, jamming into a back pocket if needed. If you've never read it or any form of The Upanishads....IT IS A MUST for anyone who found The Razor's Edge even slightly good.

Happy Reading.

Problem with The Upanishads is: What are you getting? if you get one volume, how much can that convey the meaning contained in the dozens of books in the original works...I haven't found anyone yet who can answer that, so haven't got it yet.

NorthFloridaFin
08-09-2005, 05:42 AM
Lonesome Dove (Larry McMurtry)

Probably the best book I have ever read.

unifiedtheory
08-09-2005, 12:19 PM
Any fans of horror/detective novels should give "Headhunter" by Michael Slade a read.

It's an older work but, well worth the time...the ending will blow your mind.

Slade is my fave author (although his latest stuff has been a little weak).

Like I said though, if you like this genre then grab (and read in order) Headhunter, Ghoul, Cut Throat, Ripper and Primal Scream....you won't be disappointed.

Jimi
08-09-2005, 08:40 PM
Im a big Stephen King fan myself. I dont read a whole lot but ive liked what ive read from him.

Altho im not sure it would be considred a great piece of litterature, "And Then There Was None" is a great mystery. I liked it for the most part. As far as the element of mystery i found myself changing my oppion many times throughout the book.

Quelonio
08-10-2005, 01:34 AM
I just finished reading Anthills of the Savannah, by Chinua Achebe and found it to be amazing, it is about a small fictional african country and how it moves from a democracy into a military dictatorship, viewed throught the eyes of the people involved. It is really really good, Achebe is one of the best writers now.

Also you should check out Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie, a beautiful book, or also you can try Momo by Michael Ende (the same guy that wrote the never ending story)