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Thread: Haha, Ok. Part III of my "Lists": The Top 10 WORST Miami Dolphins of all Time

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Gift received at 03-18-2014, 10:36 PM from DisturbedShifty

    Haha, Ok. Part III of my "Lists": The Top 10 WORST Miami Dolphins of all Time

    First I put my top 30 Greatest Dolphins List up. Then I decided to increase it a little bit more by going from 30 to 50. Then I got to thinking. We argue alot about who the greatest Dolphins were. But what about the worst. For every great player we ever had, there was another that was a huge detrement, distraction, disgrace, or waste for our football team. With some help of a website I found called www.thedolphinsmakemecry.com , and some more research and decision making, I composed a list of what I believe are the top 10 worst Miami Dolphins of all time. If you read this, enjoy but don't enjoy too much. You might need a box or tissues reading these. And oh by the way, I know I am going to get a TON of criticism for "one particular player" that I put on this list, but you know what, I dont care. I dont know why his supporters dont realize what a waste he is. So here is my list, if you can think of any other players, make a suggestion. And one more thing, i will not increase this list like I did the other one. These ARE my top ten!!

    10. A.J. Feeley 7...Quarterback (2004-2005)...Isn't it amazing how a certain player can be absolutely amazing for one team, than come to the Dolphins and absolutely suck? A.J. Feeley is a perfect example. This prettyboy wannabe pretty much saved the Eagles season in 2003 going 5-1 as a starter in replace of Donovan McNabb when he broke his leg, than was brought over to Miami thanks to our genious GM Rick Spielman at the time. He gave up a second round draft choice for this guy. A SECOND ROUND DRAFT CHOICE. A.J. Feeley was not even drafted in the first four rounds. I know it was not his total fault for the 2004 season, but he was god awful and proofed to himself, and more imporatntly the NFL, that he is not a starting QB in this league. He threw 15 Interceptions in 2004, 6 of them were returned for TDs. One good memory I do have with A.J. Feeley as our starter. Remember our miracle one point 29-28 Monday Night win over the Patriots in 2004? I was so happy that night I cried. But one good memory does not excuse an entire season of awfulness when the entire organization gave up a second round choice on you because they thought you were special. Again, 2004 was not totally his fault. You all KNOW whos fault it is for the 2004 season, and I know I am going to get scrutinized for this, but he is further down this list if you want to see.

    9. John Avery 20...Running Back (1998-1999)...John Avery is the complete opposite of A.J. Feeley. Another first round bust for Miami, who did not put in his best effort with Miami. He was absoultely worthess in Miami, never gaining more than 600 yards and scoring only 2 TDs. He was traded to Denver for wide reciever Marcus Nash in 1999, did not do much there in Denver, than went to the Canadian Football League had became a huge success going to two Grey Cup Championship games and winning one of them. One of those years, he was the CFL MVP. Avery even had a successful one year stint in the XFL when he was the XFL's only leading rusher. Not that it means anything, it appears to me that Avery did not put forth his best effort when he was drafted by Miami. Miami yet wasted another first round draft choice and got nothing in return for it. Instead they got a guy who is more noted for being a success elsewhere.

    TIE - 8. Dave Wannstedt / Rick Spielman...Head Coach / General Manager (2000-2004)...Maybe I'm a bit premature in putting Dave Wannastedt on this list, but when you put one on, either Rick or Dave, you have to put the other. Dave Wannstedt did take our team to four consecutive winning seasons including a division title in 2000, but he coaching style was very ineffective and predictable. Its the reason why our offense was so inept, and too reliable on Ricky Williams when he had him. A perfect example of this was the 2002 season ender at New England. Remember Miami's last offensive possession before the OT period, they were on their own side of the field, and went run, run, pass, punt...LITERALLY!! It cost us the game and the Division to those damn Jets. Dave Wannstedt was a great defensive coordinator, but he is not head coach material (just like Norv Turner). His partner in crime Rick Spielman was not so innocent either. He made so many dumb moves for our team during his tenure with the team, and pretty much left it a mess. Giving up a second round pick for A.J. Feeley, giving up a third round pick for Lamar Gordan (who was put on IR) in order to replace Ricky, and most notably, the way he poorly handled the whole Ricky Williams fiasco, and being responsible for having some of the worst drafts in team history. If you look back at his, or should I say "their" drafts (im talking about both Rick and Wanny), there lack of acquiring talent from college was evident. Only WR Chris Chambers and TE Randy McMichael are the most noted or recognized players that wound up at least decent for us. Notice I said "decent". Not great, and not awful...just decent. Both these two had so many negeative impacts on this team, its hard to even remember them all. We must appreciate what Dave did for us, getting us to four consecutive winning seasons, and a division title in 2000, however with each passing year, we went one step backwards:

    2000 - 11-5 Division Champs / Divisional Round Loss
    2001 - 11-5 2nd in Division / Wildcard loss
    2002 - 9-7 Third in Division / No Playoffs
    2003 - 10-6 2nd in Division / Became first AFC team in 17 years to have 10 wins and not make playoffs
    2004 - Started 1-8 - Lead to his resignation - Last in Division / Worst season in franchise history

    A lot of Dolphin fans claim (and agree) that the only reason why Wanny had those four somewhat good years was the fact he was winning with "Jimmy Johnson's" players. The players he drafted like Thomas, Taylor, Surtain, and Madison. From what I hear, and watch, he is not doing to good in Pittsburgh either. As for Rick Spielman, his resignation quickly followed. Both of them were going to get fired anyway, but their negative impact will always be remembered. It certainly was one of the most turbulent times in the history of this franchise.

    7. & 6. John Bosa 97 & Eric Kumerow 90...Defensive Ends (1987-1989 / 1988-1990)...Undoubtedly, the two biggest first round defensive draft busts in the history of this franchise. It’s quite rare for two players’ negative impact on the team to be linked, but such was the case in Miami in the late ‘80s. In the 1987 and 1988 drafts, the Dolphins used their first round picks on a pair of defensive ends that were to strengthen a lackluster defense, and provide balance for an explosive offense. Coaches expected the two players to immediately step in and compete for starting jobs. Instead, both would go down in history as some of Miami’s biggest draft busts. When selecting my Top 10 worst Dolphins of all time, career data is usually used to support the choice. However, in the case of Bosa and Kumerow, it is their noticeable lack of any statistics that warrants their selection. Had either player been selected outside of the first round, they would’ve faded into obscurity and been long forgotten. However, when you have consecutive first round picks at the same position, with no considerable stats on their play, it speaks volumes.

    Bosa - Drafted 1st Round (16th overall) in 1987, Played 3 years (31 Games), 7 career sacks
    Kumerow - Drafted 1st Round (16th overall) in 1988, Played 3 years (36 Games), 5 career sacks

    While the above illustrates some staggering similarities, it's the intangibles that really connect the two players. Both were considered draft reaches. Bosa was projected to go in the early second round, while Kumerow was expected to fall to the middle rounds. Both players were "tweeners" -- too small for the defensive line, yet too big and slow to play linebacker. Both were seen as finesse players, taken for potential, despite concerns that their abilities might not match an NFL system. Even their exits were alike, as both were out of football within three years of their acquisition, after suffering knee injuries. In six combined years, neither started an NFL game. But finally, and most importantly, both were drafted by Don Shula at a time when the Miami defense was in desperate need of impact players. In hindsight, it's easy to see just how crippling these two selections proved for Miami. With Marino at the helm, the Dolphin offense was dominating opposing defenses, but as good as it was, it couldn't compensate for the dismal play on the other side of the ball. A glaring example of this came in a 1986 game against the rivaled New York Jets. Marino bolstered the team with 450 yards through the air and 6 touchdowns...only to lose 51-45 in overtime. Miami needed a couple of sure things to help turn around a dismal defense, but what they got was a duo of duds, eternally known to Dolphin fans as "the Bust Brothers". It's important to note that Bosa and Kumerow's tenure came at time when the league had no salary cap or free agency. Teams were built primarily through the draft, and poor decisions often had long term impact. Taken back-to-back, the pair crippled the Miami defense for a decade, as the team was eventually forced to draft for other areas of need.

    5. Ray Lucas 6...Quarterback (2001-2002)...I'm telling you all right now, if I ever run into Ray Lucas on the street, I am going to prison because I will freakin kill him. Since Marino’s retirement after the 1999 season, mediocre QB play had haunted the Miami Dolphins. In 2002, a hungry young player waited in the wings for his chance to bring back glory to the position. Though he humbled himself through the media, proclaiming himself as the team’s backup, his confidence and swagger were undeniable. Dolphins fans ate it up, wishing to see him get his opportunity. There’s an old saying: "Be careful what you wish for; you just might get it." And boy did we ever. Lucas didn’t get his opportunity due to the poor play of the team’s starter, Jay Fielder. In a odd twist of fate, Lucas’ number was instead called after one of Jay’s gutsiest performances as a Dolphin, where he brought the team from behind in a last second victory against the Broncos. But that victory came at a cost: a broken thumb on Fiedler’s throwing hand. Lucas had shown poise and potential in 4 years as a backup with the Jets under Bill Parcels (including sweeping us in 1999), and had one year under his belt, learning Miami’s system. Fans thought that, unlike Fiedler, Lucas would be able to be more than just a game manager. ...that he could win games, where Fiedler could simply not lose them. Lucas took a 5 - 1 record and two game lead in the AFC East to Buffalo to face a struggling Bills team, ranked 25th in defense and giving up an average of 35 points per game. ...and what unfurled was worse than any Dolphins fan could have ever imagined. Against a backdrop of almost guaranteed success, Lucas took less than one quarter to show his true colors, turning in the single worst QB performance in Dolphins history. Lucas was responsible for 6 turnovers: 4 interceptions and 2 fumbles. He completed only 13 passes to Dolphin receivers. His leading receiver was Nate Clements, with 3 catches. Unfortunately, Nate played for the Bills. Lucas started a total of 6 games for Miami, going 2 - 4. In each of the losses, Lucas was the reason. Despite a dominating defense, Lucas found ways to lose. He fumbled 8 times (losing 4) and threw 6 interceptions. His QB rating was an ugly 69. Just how bad was Lucas? One announcer asked after the Buffalo game:

    "Do you think Fiedler can throw with his left hand?"

    That season, Dolphins fans learned an important lesson concerning the value of a viable backup quarterback. In 6 short weeks, Lucas took a front runner with Super Bowl hopes and turned them into a middle of the pack team. Jay Fielder returned to get off a couple of quick wins, but faded down the stretch and missed the playoffs by one game, losing in overtime at New England to close out the season. Lucas was cut that off-season. So thank you Ray Lucas for single handedly ruining our 2002 season, and dashing our Super Bowl hopes that year.

    4. Ricky Williams 34...Running Back (2002-current)...I know I am going to get a lot of heat from a bunch of Ricky Williams lovers, but I do not care. You all want to know why I did not put Ricky on my top 50 list? Well here you go. I love all fans of the Dolphins. I love all supporters of the Dolphins because this is one of the few sports franchises that I care about. But I am not supporters of Ricky Williams supporters, and until you people wake up and realize EXACTLY what he has done to this team, then I will be supporters of you. Ricky was unhappy in New Orleans, mainly because he was not their main guy any more by getting Duece McCalister. Ricky was simply bizarre down in New Orleans, doing interviews with his helmet on, wearing a gown as a bride with Mike Ditka as his groom, among other things. Yes I know he has depression problems, and right fully so. Mike Ditka gave up an ENTIRE DRAFT for him, so I can understand all the pressure that was put on him. Plus football was the only thing down in New Orleans when it came to sports. So what did Ricky want? A second chance. Well Miami gave it to him. Dave Wannstedt, Rick Spielman, and Miami front offices and management gave up 3 draft picks (two of them first rounders) for Ricky to come down to Miami and start off with a clean slate. In two seasons, yes he did alot for Miami rushing for almost 3,300 yard and recording almost 30 total TDs, but lets be honest, WHERE DID THAT GET US??!!! It appeared that we would get to a Super Bowl with him carrying the load. But what he did to this team before the 2004 season, I DONT CARE WHAT ANYONE SAYS, no Dolphin fan should ever forgive him for. He left us for his so called "retirement", so he could travel the world, take yoga classes, and smoke marijuana. HE DID THIS 3 WEEKS BEFORE CAMP STARTED!! Not 3 months, 3 WEEKS. I can understand him doing it 5 months before the season, or even 3 months, but not 3 weeks. Because of that, 3 weeks before the season started, Miami had to act quickly by getting a running back in free agency or a trade (which they did: Rick traded a 3rd round pick for the Rams Lamar Gordon, who than was put on IR cause of an injury and a waste of a draft pick), and they had to adjust their ENTIRE offense in three weeks since Ricky did not show up. Because of Ricky, and Ricky alone, Miami was not prepared going into the season. They started 0-6 en route to a 4-12 record, our worst record in franchise history. Ricky's departure caused Dave Wannstedt's resignation (he was going to get fired anyway), Rick Spielman's resignation as well (he to was going to get fired anyway), and caused Miami to use their 2nd overall pick in the 2005 draft on Ronnie Brown when they needed to address other needs even more. You think it ends there. Turns out Ricky was in a breach of contract, and now was forced to pay back $8.4 million dollars. And what did he decide...TO COME BACK...HEY...just to pay off his ****ing debt. So enter our lying, hypocrite of a coach Nick Saban, who granted to give Ricky Williams yet another chance. This was Ricky Williams second "second" chance from Miami. Ricky came back, served his four game suspension because of a third failed drug test, and split carries with Ronnie Brown. Ricky did not do bad at all, helping us to a 9-7 record. It appeared he looked like he was getting his life together again, but when all appeared right with the world, he pretty much let us down again. He failed his fourth drug test and now was suspended for the year, hurting us yet again. I don't care if it was a false positive or not. If you failed three previous tests, you know they are going to keep testing you, so you cant put yourself in a position where you might fail again. Ricky is a great ball player, but he is not a smart man. Now yet again, heading into another off season, we have this distraction to deal with. I wish Miami would rid themselves of this clown and move on. I dont care if he is in debt, let him go and let him do whatever he wants. He has single handedly changed the course of this franchise in a negative way, as one of the causations of us having a losing record in two of the last three years. In my book, that puts you in my Top 10 worst of all time, especially after the team giving you not one, but TWO second chances. For all you Ricky Williams supporters out there, you better wake up and smell the seaweed, because until Miami rids themselves of this clown, we are going to get nothing but more of the same.

    3. Yatil Green 87...Wide Reciever (1997-1999)...This one was a tough one. This player had no character issues, he was not a bad guy, and he did everything in his power to become the player he wanted to be. But Yatil Green is probably the perfect example on how cruel life can be. Whether it was his fault or not for his long term negative impact towards the Dolphins, it is certainly evident. Yatil came to the Dolphins as the first-round draft choice in 1997 out of the University of Miami (Fla.), with the highest pick that Miami had had in several years. With a string of 1st round draft busts (John Bosa, Eric Kumerow, Sammie Smith, Billy Milner), the front office was looking for a sure thing. At the NFL scouting combine, Green had scouts and coaches salivating over his size and speed. Green was the lone top receiver to run at the combine, showing no fear of a poor running surface. Here's what the scouts were saying:

    Tremendous Athlete with Great Size / Runs a 4.3/40 with a 35.5 inch Vertical Jump / Speed and Agility make him Dangerous After the Catch:

    Green looked to be a perfect fit for the Fins, and the weapon that would finally help Marino take the Dolphins back to the Super Bowl. Green even signed early so that he could get into camp and start practicing right away. Expectations among Dolphin fans were sky high, but sadly, Green never played a down in 1997. On the first day of training camp, he suffered a devastating injury, tearing his quadriceps muscles, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and cartilage in his right knee. Before it had even started, it looked like Green's NFL career was over. ...and as bad as that sounds, what happened instead was far worse. Yatil refused to go down without a fight. He began an aggressive rehabilitation program, and it wasn't long before there were rumors coming out of Miami about Green being ahead of schedule. Miami had to make a tough decision: stick with Green in hopes that he could fully recover, or draft another WR. Miami gambled on Green, passing up the chance to grab Randy Moss. At first it looked like the gamble would pay off. By the start of camp, Green was looking good, showing that he hadn't lost much of his speed. He wasn't 100 percent yet, but with several months to go before the team hit the field, the staff was confident that Yatil Green would finally line up in the aqua and orange. Unfortunately, disaster struck again. While running a pass route in non-contact drills, Green tore his ACL in his right knee for the 3rd time, leaving the Dolphins with a WR corps anchored by OJ McDuffie and Charles Jordan. Miami signed Willie Green, an unrestricted free agent from the Broncos to fill the number 3 spot. It was hardly adequate. For 2 years, Miami had been forced to patch together a receiving corps. Certainly, 1999's draft would be different. Conventional wisdom stated that Miami address their wide receiver needs early, despite having traded away their first round pick. Never one to follow conventional wisdom, Jimmy Johnson surprised everyone by not drafting a single wideout, leaving the door open for Green one more time. On opening day in 1999, Yatil Green made his debut against the Denver Broncos. After 3 years of waiting, watching, and rehabilitating, the Dolphins were rewarded with 1 catch for 6 yards. Green made appearances in 7 more games that year, never as a starter. He ended the season with 18 catches and 0 TDs. Unbelievably, Green averaged a shocking 1.25 surgeries per NFL game played:

    8 surgeries - 10 games played:

    There was no story book ending for Green; he never played another down. Whether it was his fault or not, Green's negative impact on the franchise is undeniable. Miami gave up a first round draft choice and got nothing in return. Green's contract and signing bonus cost the Dolphins millions and forced the contracts of Richmond Webb, Trace Armstrong and Tim Bowens to be renegotiated. And most importantly, his continued presence on the roster kept the front office and coaching staff from aggressively addressing the holes at wide receiver, a situation from which the organization has yet to recover.

    2. Tom Olivadotti...Defensive Coordinator (1987-1995)...This guy was a complete and total moron. Olivadotti joined the Dolphins as the Defensive Coordinator in 1987. For the next nine years, the team was christened the "Olfans", because they had no "D". For 7 years of his 9 year tenure, Olivadotti led a defense that was ranked in the bottom half of the NFL. What makes this even more painful is the knowledge that these years coincided with Marino's prime. The Dolphins consistently put up big numbers. Unfortunately, so did every team they played. It's nauseating to think of how far the Dolphins might have been able to go with even an average defense. Ironically, Olivadotti's best season statistically was also his last. Jimmy Johnson fired Olivadotti after a humiliating 37 - 22 defeat to the Buffalo Bills in the playoffs. More significant than the big points total, was the AFC record 341 yards that Buffalo gained on the ground. What made this a particularly unacceptable beating was the fact that Miami had lost to this same Bills team only 2 weeks earlier when the Bills totaled over 200 yards rushing. Olivadotti's game plan was not adjusted in the slightest. An especially fitting tribute to Olivadotti was written by a jubilant Bills fan shortly after the 1995 playoff game:

    "We have to thank everyone's favorite defensive coordinator, Tom Olivadotti. Lets give it up for the bonehead that couldn't figure out why the Bills were running all over the Dolphins."

    Thank you Tom Olivadotti for being one of the primary factors for Dan Marino never getting his ring, you ****ing bonehead!!!

    1. Sammie Smith 33...Running Back (1989-1991)...This should surprise no one. Sammie Smith is by far, the most hated player in the history of this franchise. Guaranteed, mention his name and emotion bordering on hatred will emerge from any Dolfan. A first round draft pick in 1989 (9th overall) it appeared that Miami would finally be put with a great running game to complement Marino's passing. It was never meant to be. In three undistinquished seasons, Sammie never gained 1,000 yards, never averaged more than 3.7 yards a carry, and never had more TDs than fumbles. Sammie was not considerably worse than most of Miami's running backs like Lamar Smith, Andra Franklin, and J.J. Johnson. He even did not fumble as much as Ricky Williams. What seperates Sammie from the others was his uncanny ability to fumble at the most inopportune times. Smith's career is defined by one play. Without it, he might just be one more 1st round draft bust, instead of being a pariah to Dolphin fans. In a game against the Houston Oilers in 1991, the Dolphins were trailing late in the 4th quarter. Marino drove the team to the goal line. With time running out, Smith took the hand-off, went over the top and fumbled the ball away. Houston recovered and held on to win 17 - 13. It was a carbon copy of a play from the previous week, where Smith fumbled into the end zone against the Chiefs. That one was run back for a touchdown. The back to back fumbles were labeled the "Double Whammy on Sammie". Fans had seen enough of Sammie Smith and what followed was one of the ugliest scenes in professional sports. The entire stadium erupted in chants of "Sammie Sucks". Smith needed a police escort from the stadium. ...his own stadium. He said after the game that he doubted he could ever play for this team again. He was right. Smith would be traded to Denver, where he would play a total of 3 games before being released. With no other teams interested, Smith slipped out of football and the public spotlight, at least for a while. He turned into quite a scumbag after he left football. Like so many retired athletes, Sammie wanted to give something back to the community. By "give", I mean "sell" and by "something", I mean "drugs". In 1995, Sammie was convicted of selling 12 ounces of crack, while in possession of 37.4 pounds of cocaine. He was invited to spend the next 7 years as a guest of the federal prison system. So congradulations Sammie Smith for being the number #1 worst Miami Dolphin in my eyes.
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    Brown42000's Avatar
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    Even after what Ricky Williams has done and he is without a doubt a top 50 Dolphin player of all time and does not deserve to be in this category and is one of the best backs in the league when he is playing.
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    Cecil "THE DIESEL" Collins and Lawrence Phillips.........
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    1972 Dolphins Logo
    no jamar fletcher?
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    Geforce's Avatar
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    There is one coach you are missing...Chuck Studley, defensive coordinator 1984-86. He was supposed to turn the Dolphins defensive into a top 10 unit but instead made it worse over his 3 year tenure.
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    painnotpleasure's Avatar
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    Even despite the threat, I still say Ray Lucas got off easy. Interesting read though, nonethless. Well written, good job.
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    DolphinDevil28's Avatar
    I like boobs.

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    Reggie Howard.

    No "worst" list is complete without Reggie Howard. I have never seen a Dolphins DB get burnt more than him.

    And yes, I have seen J.B. Brown.


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    Decent list.

    Bosa's name dosen't belong anywhere near Kumerow's name. Bosa was a damn good player. Got Defensive rookie of the year. He just had very bad luck in health issues.

    Kumerow on the other hand was just a flat out bust.

    I don't think Feeley should be on that list as his negative impact was negligible and a direct result of the Wanny disaster.

    Wanny should hold top honors hands down.
    He is the top disaster in Phins history without challenge.

    Olivadotti is a great pick but should share the number 2 spot with DC Chuck Studley. Both were monumental screw ups and crippled our defenses.

    Sammy Smith would follow these up to form the top 3 worst ever IMO.

    Other considerations....


    Cecil Collins has to be there. Guy had tremendous talent but just could'nt help himself in crawling into neighbors bedrooms to watch them sleep and fondle himself.

    Billy Milner was a disastrous OL pick.

    Jackie Shipp, another huge 1st round blunder.
    Had all the physical tools but just didn't have it mentally.

    Jerry Wilson may be the worst CB ever on this team.
    He was almost singlehandedly responsible for the "miracle in the meadowlands" and was regularly targeted with huge success by opposing offenses.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob19 View Post
    no jamar fletcher?


    Don't know how I forgot that one.
    The bust we skipped over Drew Brees for wasn't it?
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    Dolphins Homer1972 Dolphins LogoXbox Logo
Gift received at 03-18-2014, 10:36 PM from DisturbedShifty
    Quote Originally Posted by Coral Reefer View Post
    Decent list.

    Bosa's name dosen't belong anywhere near Kumerow's name. Bosa was a damn good player. Got Defensive rookie of the year. He just had very bad luck in health issues.

    Kumerow on the other hand was just a flat out bust.

    I don't think Feeley should be on that list as his negative impact was negligible and a direct result of the Wanny disaster.

    Wanny should hold top honors hands down.
    He is the top disaster in Phins history.

    Olivadotti is a great pick but should share the number 2 spot with DC Chuck Studley. Both were monumental screw ups and crippled our defenses.


    Cecil Collins has to be there. Guy had tremendous talent but just could'nt help himself in crawling into neighbors bedrooms to watch them sleep and fondle himself.

    Billy Milner was a disastrous OL pick.

    Jackie Shipp, another huge 1st round blunder.
    Had all the physical tools but just didn't have it mentally.

    Jerry Wilson may be the worst CB ever on this team.
    He was almost singlehandedly responsible for the "miracle in the meadowlands" and was regularly targeted with huge success by opposing offenses.
    Oh wow, I forgot about Billy Milner and Jackie Shipp. Those WERE two all time worst. Good call. Bosa, I thought was a bust period, and Jerry Wilson, surprisingly I do not remember him.
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