Welcome to FinHeaven Fans Forums! We're glad to have you here. Please feel free to browse the forum. We'd like to invite you to join our community; doing so will enable you to view additional forums and post with our other members.



VIP Members don't see these ads. Join VIP Now
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37

Thread: What were former Dolphins greats like? Historical Dolphins Info Wanted.

  1. -1
    PhinsPhan's Avatar
    Pro Bowler

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Sep 2004
    Posts:
    2,006
    vCash:
    1000
    Loc:
    Calgary, Canada
    Thanks / No Thanks

    What were former Dolphins greats like? Historical Dolphins Info Wanted.

    A question to all of you blessed with watching the No Name defense of the 70's or the Killer B's and Mark's Brothers of the early 80s. It is kind of an odd request but seeing as how hard it is to find info on these players can you help me out. I started watching in the 90s and missed out on all of these players.

    What were they like? Share your memories, thoughts and opinions. I have a lot of questions and I wish America's game would run more footage of them.

    If you don't want to go in depth just comment on their most important attributes and who you would best compare them to in the NFL today.

    QB's
    - Griese
    - Earl Morrall

    RB's
    - Csonka
    - Morris
    - Kiick
    - Nathan
    How did the 72 Dolphins run their offense with Csonka. Did he always play FB with Kiick and Morris rotating at HB? Was it primarily the I Form? Was Csonka a good run blocker?


    WR's
    - Nat Moore
    - Mark Clayton
    - Mark Duper

    RT
    - Norm Evans
    LG
    - Bob Keuchenberg
    Both of these guys were not the biggest. Were they strong none the less? Hall of fame worthy? Pass blockers or run blockers or excellent at both? Were they leaders at all or perform best when it counted?

    DE
    - Bill Stanfill
    - Doug Betters
    - Kim Bokamper
    - Bob Matheson
    I am always surprised to hear such accolades for Stanfill and to find out Betters was a DPOY. How good were these guys? What kind of pass rushers were they? Did they have any sort of special moves think Reggie with the Club or Freeney with the Spin or Taylor with the Swim. Were they effective against the run? Anyone know how many sacks they actually have (before sacks became an official stat)?

    DT
    - Bob Baumhauer
    - Manny Fernandez
    How were two guys so undersized so dominant. Which one was better? Baumhauer seemed to put up the numbers but I read Fernandez got 17 tackles in a Superbowl game. An incredible accomplishment let alone done while playing NT.

    ILB
    - A.J. Duhe
    Part of the problem is the lack of sack stats or for that matter tackles. Was this guy fast? A pass rusher? Tough? A leader? He is quite well known and yet I haven't a clue as to how he played.

    Safeties
    - Jake Scott (Hall of fame worthy?)
    - Lyle Blackwood
    - Glenn Blackwood
    Did the Blackwoods play CB at all?

    How did the 53 defense differ from the 3-4. Did they only use it on passing downs?

    What sort of defense did the Killer B's run?

    For those like me NFL.com has video of some players on their website if they appeared in NFL Films footage.

    Thanks in advance.
    Quote Quote  

  2. -2
    FinAtic8480's Avatar
    FinHeaven Elite

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Jul 2004
    Posts:
    14,760
    vCash:
    1640
    Loc:
    Miami
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Dude go to ebay and did what I did. I started collecting videos of the Miami Dolphin Seasons. You will get all your questions answered.

    Guys like Griese Morrall, Czonka, Kick, Morris, Warfield, Fernandez and Anderson and Scott were the real deal. Just bu as many videos as you can watch them and you will get the much wanted answers. Wikipedia is also a good place to research for former Phins.
    Follow me at www.twitter.com/robi2184, always updating Dolfans with the latest Miami Dolphins news.

    Zach Thomas: I played against New England twice a year every year my whole career. I learned to not like that team. I wasn't going to join them.
    Quote Quote  

  3. -3
    Roman529's Avatar
    Moon Runner / The 3 AM Crew

    Status:
    Online
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Jul 2004
    Posts:
    33,733
    vCash:
    10858
    Loc:
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Manny Fernandez was one of my favorite Phins ever. He seemed to be a guy who really loved life. He use to ride those hovercrafts out in the swamps and go after alligators. They said his eyesight was really bad but he always seemed to be around the football.....kind of like a bigger version of Zach Thomas. I saw a story about him that on the morning of one of the big games, I can't remember if it was a Superbowl or an AFC Championship Game, but his girlfriend was a flight attendant, and a plane crashed in Florida that morning and Manny thought his girlfriend was on the plane. He didn't find out until later that she was working another flight. Manny had a wild haired afro but today he is totally bald and wears glasses. He truely played for the love of the game and hated to lose. I would put him right up there with Nick Buonoconti.
    Quote Quote  

  4. -4
    elliott's Avatar
    Sheffield Fin

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Mar 2006
    Posts:
    249
    vCash:
    1000
    Loc:
    Sheffield UK
    Thanks / No Thanks
    when will bob kuechenburg make it to the HOF?

    Little and Langer are there. it's a disgrace that Kooch isn't...
    Elliott Josypenko:

    Sheffield Sabres (UK) - #75 LT 2005-2010

    Quote Quote  

  5. -5
    PhinsPhan's Avatar
    Pro Bowler

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Sep 2004
    Posts:
    2,006
    vCash:
    1000
    Loc:
    Calgary, Canada
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by FinAtic8480 View Post
    Dude go to ebay and did what I did. I started collecting videos of the Miami Dolphin Seasons. You will get all your questions answered.

    Guys like Griese Morrall, Czonka, Kick, Morris, Warfield, Fernandez and Anderson and Scott were the real deal. Just bu as many videos as you can watch them and you will get the much wanted answers. Wikipedia is also a good place to research for former Phins.
    Problem is I can only find 90s videos. For some reason the early 80s is especially tough to find footage on.
    Quote Quote  

  6. -6
    Awsi Dooger's Avatar
    Hall Of Famer

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Feb 2005
    Posts:
    6,590
    vCash:
    10748
    Loc:
    Las Vegas
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Stick to the '70s specifically early to mid '70s. That's my ultimate advice. Too many Miami fans want to blend the Dolphins of the early to mid '80s into the discussion but those teams were comparative mush.

    Agreed, it's incomparably frustrating that videos of the glory era are not readily available. Extremely difficult to acquire, or get a full feel for what that team was like. Luckily I have a great memory so I can picture all the key plays and games, when Miami was captivated by a sports team unlike anything before or since, but I can understand how it must be vague and elusive to a younger fan.

    Incredibly resourceful team with ultra dedicated players. After a loss the WIOD radio coverage would be stunned deflated silence, players in no mood to speak. A wandering goofball like today's Channing Crowder would have been jettisoned on the first day of camp, no place for him.

    Will McDonough of the Boston Globe always said it was the smartest team in NFL history. That's an excellent base summary. Scott and Anderson were not only great safeties who communicated openly throughout the game, but they were the two dual punt returners, a practice that I'm amazed has been discontinued in the league, or football in general. Anderson was the kamikaze up man who refused to let the punt drop to the cement Poly Turf. He'd gobble up every short punt to prevent the 20 yard roll. Miami got great field position so many times due to that strategy. Scott was the cool customer deep man. He was very dangerous, particularly in his early years as a returner. I remember a circling TD return in the great 34-17 home win over Baltimore in 1970. That was the first major Orange Bowl eruption of the love affair with the newly competitive Dolphins.

    Similarly, Miami was very resourceful on blocking place kicks. Lloyd Mumphord was the outside rusher, flanked inside by Curtis Johnson. If the opponent overplayed Johnson on the inside it gave Mumphord a free dash around the corner. Just the opposite if the flank blocker picked up Mumphord. In that case, Johnson would sneak inside.

    Scott also advised Shula to surrender the safety late in the famous 30-26 win over Pittsburgh on Monday Night in '73, a move that no one saw coming, including Cosell and the ABC booth. Giving up that safety is somewhat common today but at the time it was very, very rare, and never discussed.

    I haven't seen anything in 25+ years that even threatened the smarts and advantage positioning of that early '70s team. That's why it's so frustrating and laughable when I see the Marino era heralded, here or elsewhere. I've got to shake my head and try not to post in disgust. A guy who was too bothered to play fake, a masochistically low number of rushing attempts every year, and we want to claim it was the heyday of Dolphin football. Believe whatever you want.

    Keuchenberg is Hall of Fame worthy but he played in a great era for offensive lineman and routinely was described as no better than 3rd best lineman on his own team. The two guys were who terrific, and Hall of Fame caliber if not for serious injuries shortening their careers, were Bill Stanfill and Dick Anderson.
    Quote Quote  

  7. -7
    al711's Avatar
    Starter

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Apr 2008
    Posts:
    288
    vCash:
    1113
    Thanks / No Thanks
    I've been watching Dolphins games since the early seventies too,and while I think the early seventies teams are the best overall,you can't say the early eighty's teams were mush. Don Strock,Bob Buamhower,Tony Nathan,Don Mcneal,Dwight Stevenson just to name a few and don't forget two Super Bowl appearances in three years,the early eighties were a great time to be a Dolphins fan.

    I agree with the poster that said to get all the video you can, good luck!!
    Quote Quote  

  8. -8
    dolfanmark's Avatar
    Seasoned Veteran

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Feb 2005
    Posts:
    975
    vCash:
    1000
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Griese was a technician. He was sort of like Pennington, but with a better arm. And in his younger days, he could scramble pretty good. And in those days, Griese called all his own plays.

    Csonka was just amazing. He weighed 255 lbs. The thing was, at that time, most linemen were about 250. There's really no one to compare him to. He was bigger than your average lineman, and he was just a beast. One of my favorite clips has him being stood up in a pile, held by the legs, and he's just swinging forearms at every defender who tries to finish him off. He also once got called for unnecessary roughness for basically punching a DB in the face as he ran him over.

    Mercury Morris was a real jitterbug with amazing speed. When he retired, he had the 3rd highest average yards per carry in league history (behind Brown and Sayers). If you get the Miami Dolphins Silver Anniversary video, there are just some amazing highlights. No one could turn the corner like Merc.

    Kiick was sort of a 3rd down back. They used him to catch passes, and they liked to run him inside the 10. He was known as a "money" back.

    Nathan was a great receiver out of the backfield, and a better runner than given credit for. He had a great average per carry. He just had to share carries for his whole career because Shula liked to share the workload.

    You didn't mention Warfield, but I will. He was Jerry Rice before Jerry Rice. The only WR to average better than 20 yards per catch for his entire career. And he averaged a TD once every 5 catches.

    Nat Moore was a RB coming out of college. He was a quality WR. We threw the ball a lot in 1977, and he had a great year. When Duper and Clayton came along, he moved to the 3rd WR spot where he really excelled.

    Nobody was tougher than Mark Clayton. Clayton would not be denied a catch or a TD. For a little guy, he was super scrappy. If he caught the ball inside the 10, he was getting a TD, regardless of how many DB were around.

    Duper was a world class sprinter. He ran the anchor for the NCAA record holders in the 4x100M relay. He had a gear that no one else had. And he was tough, too, just not as tough as Clayton.

    Bill Stanfill was an absolute monster. He was just a dominant, dominant pass rusher. Sacks weren't even an offical stat back then, so he really didn't get the recognition he deserved.

    Betters was a very good player, another good pass rusher.

    Kim Bokamper was a LB that moved to DE. He was a good pass rusher, but teams ran right at him because he was undersized.

    Bob Baumhower was a perennial Pro Bowl guy. He was great on the nose. He stuffed the run, and could collapse the pocket.

    Bob Matheson wasn't really anything special. The 53 defense was named for him. We had a bunch of injuries one game at DE. So, they put in their biggest LB at DE, and it was Matheson. He kept jumping offsides, and he told the coaches he couldn't get used to the stance. So, they told him to stand up, just stop jumping offide. And the 3-4 defense was born (we called it the 53, for Matheson). He did a good job rushing the passer, but didn't really have an outstanding career.

    Manny Fernandez was an animal. You never saw more big plays from a DT.

    AJ Duhe was a great talent. He would line up at DT, DE, OLB, and ILB, all in the same game. It created total chaos for opposing offenses.

    Jake Scott was a great player. Not only at safety, but he was a good punt returner too. And he was the MVP of Super Bowl VII with 2 picks. Personally, I always felt Dick Anderson was more HOF worthy. Anderson always seemed to make the big play when you needed it. And who could forget his 4 INT game against Pitt on MNF? Or his big INT return for TD against the Colts in the playoffs?

    Glenn Blackwood was a good run stuffer at SS. We got his brother Lyle out of retirement when we had a bunch of injuries. Both were slow, but smart. They always managed to be in the right spot at the right time. Lyle had the big pick in a great MNF game against Philly. That was the game where Don Strock led a furious rally, and Duriel Harris blew out his knee celebrating a TD.

    The Killer B's ran a 3-4. It was Bokamper-Baumhower-Betters across the front. Bob Brudzinski was the big run stuffing LB on the strong side, with AJ Duhe next to him, tackling machine Earnie Rhone next to him, and the dynamic Larry Gordon on the weakside. Gordon tragically died of a heart attack at age 29. Don McNeal and Gerald Small were both very good corners, especially McNeal. McNeal had a world of talent and was taking his place among the game's elite when injuries ruined his career. And of course, the Bruise Brothers at safety.
    Quote Quote  

  9. -9
    finboss's Avatar
    Starter

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Jul 2007
    Posts:
    321
    vCash:
    1000
    Loc:
    Guymon, Oklahoma
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Fantastic thread. It is a pleasure to read such intelligent and well-written material on this subject. Many thanks.
    Finboss
    Quote Quote  

  10. -10
    hemidemon's Avatar
    Starter

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Mar 2008
    Posts:
    1,770
    vCash:
    1272
    Loc:
    Miami
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Dooger and dolfanmark are right. I hope they don't mind if I add on a little. Miami used to run a sweep with guard Larry Little and Larry Czonka as the lead blockers and Morris running the ball. Little was a big guard that could run. They struck fear in defenses with that play. They used to swallow up defenders with it. Larry even commented that they could see the fear in the eyes of defenders thay faced. Not to take anything away for the 80s Dolphins, but the early 70s team was unique. Both on and off the field. If you really want a good idea of the characters on that team just take a look at my avatar. It's from the Sports Illustrated cover dated August 7, 1972. Look at Czonka's right hand. He's shooting the camraman a bird. Jim Kiick knew it and was laughing. SI missed it and the cover was published. It's currently the most famous cover in SI's history. Czonka and Kiick once put an alligator in Shula's shower. Shula loved Czonka so much he even named his dog Zonk. Jim Mandich describes Larry as a freak of nature. He said he even knew then that Larry Czonka was an indistructable force. To this day Larry is the only running back in NFL history to be called for unnessary roughness. I still laugh about that Bills defender that got punched in the jaw and was laid out flat as Czonka kept running down the sideline. Yeah, that early 70s team was unique. They hated to lose, they loved football, and they loved life. They played that way and they lived thay way.
    Quote Quote  

Similar Threads

  1. Historical Dolphins Moments
    By Dsteve in forum Miami Dolphins Forum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-13-2012, 05:31 PM
  2. Miami Dolphins: Historical kings of the AFC East
    By BAMAPHIN 22 in forum Miami Dolphins Forum
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 06-15-2009, 10:17 AM
  3. Some info for those who wanted Rod Gardner
    By PhinPhreak in forum Miami Dolphins Forum
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 07-27-2005, 11:47 PM
  4. 1974 Dolphins Historical Tidbit
    By TXFinFan in forum Miami Dolphins Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-28-2005, 07:28 PM
  5. Muck: here's that info you wanted
    By Scrap in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-17-2003, 11:08 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •