Welcome to FinHeaven Fans Forums! We're glad to have you here. Please feel free to browse the forum. We'd like to invite you to join our community; doing so will enable you to view additional forums and post with our other members.



VIP Members don't see these ads. Join VIP Now
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: B.J. Cunningham overview and analysis nfl.com

  1. -1
    phinatic1399's Avatar
    Diehard Phinatic!

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Dec 2008
    Posts:
    2,896
    vCash:
    197
    Loc:
    Syracuse, NY
    Thanks / No Thanks

    B.J. Cunningham overview and analysis nfl.com

    Overview

    Cunningham has been a highly regarded prospect. He has size for the position and is a very polished, well-rounded receiver. He was a durable starter, making him a solid third-round value.
    Analysis

    Strengths

    Cunningham is very savvy off the ball when getting into his route, using his core strength to swat away hands and lean on corners. He has very quick feet and can get corners off balance in-route, and can burst and then snap routes off quickly, gaining separation. He is a good zone-feel receiver who likes to sit in holes, catch the ball and work upfield. He is a strong and physical player who makes his presence felt when blocking downfield. Weaknesses

    Cunningham can struggle if he doesn't get open quickly with his footwork. He can be physical in routes, which at times can allow defensive backs to run in-phase with him.

    http://www.nfl.com/draft/2012/profil...ham?id=2532824
    Quote Quote  

  2. -2
    Pro Bowler

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Apr 2010
    Posts:
    1,804
    vCash:
    4046
    Loc:
    Jersey
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Dolphins Homer1972 Dolphins Logo2013 Dolphins Logo
    Seems like a good pick, very solid ran a pro style offense at Michigan State. I think Philbin is putting an extremely high emphasis on route running for our receivers.
    Quote Quote  

  3. -3
    Scout Team

    Status:
    Online
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Apr 2010
    Posts:
    25
    vCash:
    1164
    Loc:
    Erie, PA
    Thanks / No Thanks
    he'll run slants all day long...very polished and not afraid of contact...hands look pretty good and plays a little faster than his 40 time. he should contribute...
    Quote Quote  

  4. -4
    Rookie

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Apr 2007
    Posts:
    10
    vCash:
    1042
    Thanks / No Thanks
    His highlights are very intriguing.
    Quote Quote  

  5. -5
    dr.jake's Avatar
    Rookie

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Oct 2008
    Posts:
    799
    vCash:
    1000
    Thanks / No Thanks
    well the marshall trade cost us two second rounders. are bj and rishard second round values?
    Quote Quote  

  6. -6
    tay0365's Avatar
    Hall Of Famer

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    May 2004
    Posts:
    7,949
    vCash:
    6080
    Loc:
    NJ
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by dr.jake View Post
    well the marshall trade cost us two second rounders. are bj and rishard second round values?
    Considering how many balls Marshall dropped last year(Especially all the early TDs he dropped), if both BJ and Rashard contribute, and are consistant (very little, to no drops) It will pretty much even out.

    I doubt niether will ever be as good as Marshall, but if you end up with as much or more production from both receivers combined, you can feel good at the end of the day, especially without all the off-field issues.
    Quote Quote  

  7. -7
    ckparrothead's Avatar
    Premium Member

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    May 2002
    Posts:
    47,122
    vCash:
    2610
    Loc:
    Tampa, FL
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Blog Entries:
    2
    I'm not as big a fan of the Cunningham pick.

    First, what he does well. He runs slants and drags/crossers really well. He has steady balance during his run which lets him see the ball and snatch it with his hands without breaking stride one bit, and this is one of the first things I noticed about him at Shrine practice. When he's not running a route where he can run through the catch, he stays balanced, gathers his feet under him very quickly, and that makes him ready to run after the catch immediately. He's pretty big at 6'1" and 211 lbs, and that helps him break marginal tackle attempts from smaller players. He gets north-south very quickly in his run after catch and his size helps him get an extra yard or two even after solid contact. He's a smart player that can recognize the leverage of his coverage on the run and knows how to adjust his route accordingly so that a quarterback can throw him open. His eyes and balance help him adjust to the ball in the air. He can execute a scramble drill.

    Now what he's not good at. He has no real lower body strength or explosion. He doesn't run outs, comebacks or curls with the kind of burst out of his break that you want to see because he's not a very explosive player and lacks the leg strength. He's not fast and he won't outrun anyone. His lack of leg strength and explosiveness means he can't make sharp cuts or get creative with his run after catch, so big plays will be at a minimum with him. That's why he's a no-nonsense north-south runner after the catch. He has no choice. His lack of lower body explosion means that he can't go up real strong for the football in contested/jump ball situations, nor are his hands very strong for those situations either. Getting off the jam will be a big test for him because he lacks both lower body and upper body strength (12 bench reps). He did this OK against smaller, non-physical corners at the college level, but bigger, more physical corners clearly gave him trouble at the jam, and when he gets to the NFL the players most likely to jam him will be those big and/or physical corners.

    That's the player I saw. I'll leave it to you to decide whether that's good enough. When I hear "he's just a great football player" that's often code for "he's productive but I don't know why". It's also usually an indication to me that a coach was involved in the pick. My guess is either Philbin or O'Keefe had a lot to do with the Cunningham pick, whereas Jeff Ireland had more to do with the Rishard Matthews pick.
    Twitter: @ckparrot
    Quote Quote  

  8. -8
    NUGap's Avatar
    Starter

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Mar 2012
    Posts:
    236
    vCash:
    1000
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by ckparrothead View Post
    Now what he's not good at. He has no real lower body strength or explosion. He doesn't run outs, comebacks or curls with the kind of burst out of his break that you want to see because he's not a very explosive player and lacks the leg strength. He's not fast and he won't outrun anyone. His lack of leg strength and explosiveness means he can't make sharp cuts or get creative with his run after catch, so big plays will be at a minimum with him. That's why he's a no-nonsense north-south runner after the catch. He has no choice. His lack of lower body explosion means that he can't go up real strong for the football in contested/jump ball situations, nor are his hands very strong for those situations either. Getting off the jam will be a big test for him because he lacks both lower body and upper body strength (12 bench reps). He did this OK against smaller, non-physical corners at the college level, but bigger, more physical corners clearly gave him trouble at the jam, and when he gets to the NFL the players most likely to jam him will be those big and/or physical corners.
    On the curls/comebacks, you'll have to excuse my ignorance because I'm certainly no expert on route running. I went and watched a solid chunk of his games, and I noticed on curls a lot of the time, he'd get a hard release up to the break point. Instead of getting a strong, hard cut back by planting his leg - he'd almost stop and just sort of turn around quickly. It wasn't so much a cut as a spin back to face the QB. The best example I can find is in this year's Michigan game in the 3rd quarter at 2:43 in the game. Is this something they would coach at Michigan State, is it just a technique I'm not familiar with, am I just crazy, or is this what you're talking about?

    I kind of informally counted drops when I watched about 4 games of Cunningham's. I came out with about 4 drops in 4 games. Based on the number of passes to him during those games, I came out to something like a 13% drop rate - which according to PFF is about the same as Brandon Marshall. I tried to make sure they were definite concentration drops, but doesn't mean Cousins wasn't just throwing a bad ball either. Something to think about, not sure if it was the size of his hands or just concentration problems.

    There were a few times, mostly in the Michigan and Ohio State games, where I saw him drag about two to three defenders after the catch on a slant route for a first down. Those plays reminded me of Bess about two or three years ago (I don't know if we saw it much last year) where he would stay up and push for more yards with his legs. Like you said, it could just be a product of smaller defenders. It's likely he can't translate that to the strength of the NFL, I'm not sure many can.

    I can't seem to find any cutups of the Nebraska game for Cunningham. I remember Cousins and MSU having an awful game, I'd be curious to see how Cunningham fared against Dennard (assuming Dennard wasn't on Keshawn Martin). I see that he had zero catches in that game, was that a product of Dennard or was Cousins just as bad as I remember him being then? If so, I'm not sure that bodes particularly well.
    Quote Quote  

  9. -9
    TedSlimmJr's Avatar
    Hartselle Tigers (15-0) 5-A State Champ

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Jul 2008
    Posts:
    8,901
    vCash:
    2771
    Thanks / No Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by NUGap View Post
    On the curls/comebacks, you'll have to excuse my ignorance because I'm certainly no expert on route running. I went and watched a solid chunk of his games, and I noticed on curls a lot of the time, he'd get a hard release up to the break point. Instead of getting a strong, hard cut back by planting his leg - he'd almost stop and just sort of turn around quickly. It wasn't so much a cut as a spin back to face the QB. The best example I can find is in this year's Michigan game in the 3rd quarter at 2:43 in the game. Is this something they would coach at Michigan State, is it just a technique I'm not familiar with, am I just crazy, or is this what you're talking about?

    I kind of informally counted drops when I watched about 4 games of Cunningham's. I came out with about 4 drops in 4 games. Based on the number of passes to him during those games, I came out to something like a 13% drop rate - which according to PFF is about the same as Brandon Marshall. I tried to make sure they were definite concentration drops, but doesn't mean Cousins wasn't just throwing a bad ball either. Something to think about, not sure if it was the size of his hands or just concentration problems.

    There were a few times, mostly in the Michigan and Ohio State games, where I saw him drag about two to three defenders after the catch on a slant route for a first down. Those plays reminded me of Bess about two or three years ago (I don't know if we saw it much last year) where he would stay up and push for more yards with his legs. Like you said, it could just be a product of smaller defenders. It's likely he can't translate that to the strength of the NFL, I'm not sure many can.

    I can't seem to find any cutups of the Nebraska game for Cunningham. I remember Cousins and MSU having an awful game, I'd be curious to see how Cunningham fared against Dennard (assuming Dennard wasn't on Keshawn Martin). I see that he had zero catches in that game, was that a product of Dennard or was Cousins just as bad as I remember him being then? If so, I'm not sure that bodes particularly well.


    Well, these are option routes, not curls/comebacks. Cunningham has to hitch up at the mark... if the ball isn't on him when he turns around, he has to drift inside or out from there to find the soft spot in the zone dependent upon how the defender is playing his zone.

    A curl is a turn towards the hash out of your break and works back towards the quarterback and back down the stem of the route. A comeback is a break away from the hash towards the sideline and works back towards the quarterback. A comeback doesn't work back down the stem.
    Quote Quote  

  10. -10
    phinnatic91's Avatar
    Rookie

    Status:
    Offline
    WPA:
    Join date:
    Dec 2010
    Posts:
    19
    vCash:
    1064
    Thanks / No Thanks
    JEFF Fuller should make it atleast on practice squad but like the Cunningham pick heard on finsider that Philbin was happy with the pick..thats what counts
    Quote Quote  

Similar Threads

  1. Am I the only one that really likes B.J Cunningham?
    By MiamiDolfan85 in forum Miami Dolphins Forum
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 04-30-2012, 09:42 PM
  2. B.J. Cunningham
    By FearTheBeard in forum NFL Draft Forum
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 04-28-2012, 06:30 PM
  3. Why no love for BJ Cunningham
    By JRoX85 in forum NFL Draft Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-18-2011, 01:53 AM
  4. Replies: 35
    Last Post: 07-08-2004, 01:39 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •