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Thread: Draft Prospects

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    24. Kawann Short DT Purdue 6'3" 310
    Skill-Set Summary: Short has a nice combination of quickness and strength. He is strong at the point of attack and is a stout run defender. Offensive linemen can't push Short around, as he holds his ground. Off the snap of the ball, Short has impressive initial quickness to fire into his gap. He is capable of beating guards with his quickness and commands extra blocking attention on the interior of the line. He has natural pad level and leverage with his height, so NFL teams won't have to worry about him playing too high. If Short had a quality end next to him, they could provide a tough combo pass rush from the inside and outside.

    Short looks like a first- or second-round pick. He has one big thing going for him, and that is his interior pass-rushing skills. It is hard for NFL teams to find good pass-rushers from the defensive tackle position. Constantly, 4-3 defenses are in dire need of a interior pass rushers. Short would be a good fit as a three-technique pass-rusher in a 4-3 scheme like a Tampa 2. Even though he hasn't been a superstar, Short's consistency in terms of getting to the quarterback could easily push him well into the first round.

    Short could possibly be a five-technique in a 3-4 defense, but that doesn't look like a natural fit. There are plenty of 4-3 teams that will need tackle help, so if Short stays consistent, he has a good shot to be a first-rounder and shouldn't be any worse than a second-round pick.
    http://walterfootball.com/scoutingreport2013kshort.php
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 09:50 AM.
    "It happens all the time," Taylor said. "It's not an exact science and personnel guys aren't the end-all, be-all. " Jason Taylor,2011
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    25. Chase Thomas OLB Stanford 6'4" 245
    If you're looking for a pro comparison, Thomas' game is similar to Chicago Bears rookie Shea McClellin and Packers outside linebacker Clay Matthews. Thomas is a dangerous edge rusher who has a knack for producing sack-fumbles. He is quick off the snap with good athleticism to dodge linemen and get to the quarterback.

    Thomas is good in space, too. He does well dropping into coverage and is a solid pass defender. Thomas flows to the ball well and is a good tackler in run defense. He needs to improve his ability to shed blocks. That is his biggest weakness right now.

    Like McClellin and Matthews, Thomas is extremely instinctive. He is around the ball and has a knack for producing big plays. Thomas should go to a 3-4 defense in the NFL. He would probably be a Sam (strongside) linebacker in a 4-3 defense. Thomas would be a quality defender in a 4-3, but his pass-rushing in a 3-4 defense is his greatest strength. He also has the flexibility to play some inside linebacker in the 3-4.

    Thomas has the frame to add weight. In the NFL, it would be ideal if he was playing in the 250-260 range.
    http://walterfootball.com/scoutingreport2013cthomas.php
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 09:51 AM.
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    26. T.J. McDonald FS USC 6'3" 205
    T.J. McDonald, following in his father's footsteps as an All-American safety at USC, is a top safety prospect for the 2012 NFL Draft. That family pedigree shows up on the field in an athlete with a very high football IQ. While many free safeties in today's NFL are a touch undersized, with the new breed of high-flying passing games, safeties need to get bigger to take away tight ends and take away the deep ball. McDonald fits in that role at 6'2" and a frame that could still add at least another 10 pounds of mass.
    McDonald really plays well in man-to-man coverage whether he's shadowing a tight end or lined up at or near the line against a slot receiver. His fluid hips and long frame will help him break up a great number of pass plays in his area. McDonald isn't great against the run, but plays intelligently with instincts in his assignment. He won't blow up many runners like LaRon Landry or Troy Polamalu, but he is a willing tackler with a knack for being around the ball.
    His all-around game should carry him to be in the mix as one of the best safety prospects in this draft class.
    http://www.fftoolbox.com/nfl_draft/p...ospect_id=3026
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 09:53 AM.
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    27. Manti Te'o ILB Notre Dame 6'2" 255
    This highly-regarded linebacker from Notre Dame can do just about anything he wants on a football field. Whether it is his run defense, pass coverage, tackling or ability to read and react to offenses, he has the potential to make the play. Te'o plays downhill, showing a great burst in getting after the ball carrier. His high football IQ will have him in the mix on nearly every play. If there is one particular skill set that will need to get better fast it is his pass coverage and ability to run sideline to sideline. He does not have great speed, which shouldn't hurt his draft stock too badly. What adds to his value though is his ability to play all three downs. Many linebackers do not play every down. Te'o can flash play-making ability against tight ends in man or zone coverage.
    He is a clean tackler with great technique. He drives through the ball carrier regularly, stays low and looks to stay lower than his opponent. Te'o had surgery two offseasons ago. It caused him to miss most of spring practice this year.
    The 6'2", 255 lb. ILB is expected to be drafted in the first half of the first round in the 2013 NFL Draft.
    http://www.fftoolbox.com/nfl_draft/p...ospect_id=3043
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 10:32 AM.
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    28. Kenny Vaccaro SS Texas 6'1" 215
    The thing that stands out the most about Vaccaro is his instincts. He does a good job of staying around the ball in the passing attack and ground game. Vaccaro has good range, too, and covers a lot of ground; posessing the quickness to cover the deep part of the field. He has good size to defend the run and is a nice form tackler.

    Vaccaro should look to improve his ball skills and takeaways as a senior. If he can produce a nice total of interceptions and forced fumbles, that will really help his draft stock. Vaccaro looks like a strong safety type for the NFL. He also could be a core contributor to special teams units.
    http://walterfootball.com/scoutingre...13kvaccaro.php
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 10:35 AM.
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    29. Bacarri Rambo FS Georgia 6'0" 218
    Rambo really can do it all. He is a tough run defender and an instinctive coverage safety who has a real presence in all levels of the field.

    It is clear that Rambo is a physical specimen. When playing in the tackle box, he looks like a linebacker. Rambo is thickly built and clearly comfortable playing near the point of attack. He has an aggressive style that makes him a hard-nosed defender.

    The Bulldogs line Rambo up all over the field. He flies around the field and finds ways to be around the ball. Rambo has a big impact in the run and pass game due to his instincts.

    Rambo has phenomenal ball skills. He has good hands to make tough catches and also does a nice job of slapping passes away when he can't make an interception.

    Rambo is a real ballhawk who does a good job of reading a quarterback's eyes. He jumps routes and has a real burst to close gaps between his landmark and receivers. There aren't many safeties that have Rambo's ball skills and ability to create interceptions.

    Sometimes Rambo can overpursue and be too aggressive. That leads to him getting caught out of position or taking a bad angle. Once he expands his football knowledge and gains experience, he should get better in this regard.

    The senior also needs to continue to work on his tackling technique. Overall, these are minor and correctable issues that should be resolved by NFL coaches.

    Rambo is a complete package should fit any NFL defensive scheme. He can work as a strong safety or free safety in run-defense or pass-coverage. The only thing holding Rambo back is Rambo himself. His off-the-field issues and drug-related incidents are going to cause teams to move him down their draft boards. He needs to show more maturity and better decision-making.
    http://walterfootball.com/scoutingreport2013brambo.php
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 10:36 AM.
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    30. Brad Sorensen QB Southern Utah 6'4" 235
    Positives:
    +Strongest arm of the draft class
    +Composure
    +Escapability in the pocket
    +Release
    +Footwork
    +Accuracy
    +Decision making
    +Keen sense of the blitz
    +Production
    +Makes solid pre-snap reads
    Negatives:
    -FCS competition
    -Remarkably heavy feet
    -Struggles to repeat his mechanics
    -Constantly locks onto receivers
    -System offense
    -Never done a 3 step drop
    -When he misses, he misses high (more likely to cause interceptions)

    Southern Utah quarterback Brad Sorensen (transfer from BYU) is one of the more underrated prospects of this draft class. I want to start off by admitting Iíve only seen him play one game. In most cases, I donít feel comfortable writing a scouting report on a player unless I see him play two or three times, but I have to make exceptions for FCS prospects, because it isnít easy for me to get game film on them.
    Sorensen has good size but poor speed. At 6í4, he has solid height (although he looks a bit closer to 6í2 on film), he has ideal bulk at 235lbs (big enough to avoid injury, but not excessive), but he has very poor speed, evidence by his film as well as his 4.96 40 yard dash. Sorensen has a solid body for an NFL quarterback.
    Sorensen has excellent stats. In 2011, he completed 67.8% of his passes while throwing for 3143 yards in only 11 games (short schedule in the FCS), while throwing 17 touchdowns but 11 interceptions. 3143 yards in only 11 games is terrific, but the 11 interceptions are reason for concern. On the other hand, he got stronger as the season went on, having a quarterback rating of 146 in his last 3 games (compared to 137 on the season), and he was clearly a bit unlucky from a touchdown standpoint last season. In the FBS, no quarterback threw for over 3100 yards, had less than 14 interceptions, yet still had less than 23 touchdowns. But Sorensen only had 17 touchdowns, so the numbers were clearly unusual. Sorensen has solid stats.
    Sorensen has phenomenal throw power, probably the best throw power of any quarterback in this yearís draft class. Sorensen also puts excellent zip on his passes, and he makes sure to have a nice touch on his deep ball. Sorensen has a cannon for an arm and is really the only gunslinger in this draft class.
    Sorensen has excellent accuracy. There are times when he has very poor mechanics, but he can be surprisingly accurate even when his mechanics are poor. He throws a beautiful deep ball, he has a keen instinct for knowing how much zip he should put on his passes, and he rarely misses his targets. He also is remarkably accurate on the run and during roll outs. On the downside, when he misses, he misses high, which is a major red flag, since throwing above your target (especially over the middle) can lead to lots and lots of interceptions. He also has a tendency to throw behind receivers that are running horizontal routes, the result of a footwork problem I will delve into later.
    Something I canít help but love with Sorensen is his coolness and composure with every aspect of playing quarterback. Something Iíve always hated are quarterbacks who ďplay like their hair is on fire,Ē i.e. Kyle Boller, Blaine Gabbert, etc. These quarterbacks usually make crazy decisions when faced with the blitz, often string lots of interceptions consecutively, are very inconsistent, pull their hands out too early when taking the snap under center, drop lots of snaps when in the shotgun, and really rush their dropbacks, causing bad footwork in the pocket. Sorensen doesnít match any of these descriptions. He doesnít allow pressure to influence him to make crazy decisions, he has a short memory when it comes to interceptions, he is very relaxed and comfortable in the pocket, he constantly catches inaccurate snaps, and his dropbacks always keep him in a good position to make a throw. Speaking of which, he has a nice front shoulder drop at the end of his dropback, which can stabilize his shoulders heading into the throw.
    Sorensen is a solid decision maker, but there are flaws here. He never really makes bad decisions or forces his throws, but, at the same time, he has a tendency to lock onto receivers. Although he makes excellent pre-snap reads, considering the offense he plays in, he needs to do a better job of not locking onto those reads as soon as he gets the ball. Most plays that Southern Utah runs take a long time to develop, because they donít incorporate any kind of West Coast offense like quick passing game, and routes like the dig, post, and fly take a long time to be completed. For example, on the dig route, it generally takes a receiver about 3 seconds to get 12 yards downfield and then make a sharp cut inside and get open. But, in the NFL, if a quarterback stares down a receiver for 3 seconds waiting for him to get open, someone on the defense in going to notice the QB staring at him and make sure the receiver canít get the ball. Luckily, if he realizes his primary receiver isnít open, Sorensen is smart enough to not force the throw, but he still needs to do a better job of hiding his intentions. Again, Sorensen never forces throws, but he needs to learn not to lock onto receivers.
    Sorensen has pretty good mechanics, but there are flaws here. The biggest flaw is that he struggles to repeat his delivery (a phrase usually seen in the scouting reports of baseball pitchers), especially on the follow through. When the ball is out of the quarterbackís hands, his hips should be facing the target, his back foot should be dragging toward the target, and his front foot should be pointed toward the target. Sorensen has a tendency not to open up his hips enough on the follow through, which often causes passes to be thrown to far to the right and be thrown a bit too low. The funny thing is that his arm and feet have adjusted to this flaw in his mechanics. On many throws, Sorensenís feet are angled in a way where the ball should theoretically go to the left of the target, but problems with his follow through make the ball go to the right of the target, and, on most plays (especially over the middle), these flaws cancel each other out resulting in a perfect throw. The problem is that, on all throw to receivers running routes that arenít completely vertical and are 12 to 30 yards down the field (the post is a good example), Sorensen has to follow through just to get enough zip on his passes so no one can jump the route. Again, his footwork and his arm mechanics are adjusted so that he is accurate when he doesnít follow through enough. When he does follow through, the ball sails high and to the left, and it is often an interception. There arenít a lot of quarterbacks that have perfect mechanics, and these throws, though not uncommon, donít need to be made on every play in the NFL, but it is still a reason for concern. Normally, the lack of a follow through also results in slow passes, but Sorensenís arm is strong enough that he can get away with it on most passes. He also has a quick release. Sorensen has solid, although no perfect, mechanics.
    Sorensen has some incredibly heavy feet. Iím pretty sure he has cinder blocks tied around his cleats that make it hard for him to pick up his feet on most throws. His feet are so heavy that much of Southern Utahís offense is designed around his heavy, heavy feet. They donít allow him to make 3 step drops or throw quick passes, simply because he canít adjust his feet to the position of the receiver in a short time. His heavy feet make it nearly impossible for him to make throws to receivers who are at an angle <30 degrees relative to the line of scrimmage, so hitch routes and outs are nearly out of the question (when they are used, he consistently throws it behind the receiver). To be frank he canít ďmake all the throwsĒ because of his heavy feet. But, if he goes to an offense similar to that of Southern Utah, he could still have success in the NFL.
    Itís rare that you see the phrases ďheavy feetĒ and ďlots of escapability in the pocketĒ used in the same sentence, but thatís honestly a good description of Sorensen. Sorensen can really evade the blitz well in the pocket, namely because he is fantastic at ducking under tacklers when under pressure (he ducks under guys all the time. It never stops. I donít know how he does it), plus Iím 99% sure he has eyes in the back of his head that tell him when pressure is coming from his blindside. He seems to put himself in the only position in the pocket not surrounded by penetrating pass rushers, he stays low and ducks under potential tacklers better than any quarterback I have ever seen, he is very poised under pressure, and he seems to know where every defensive linemen is on the field as the play is going on. I canít help but wonder if offensive linemen on Southern Utah are told to yell something when someone is penetrating their block, because Sorensen seems to have an unbelievable knowledge of where pass rushers are coming from, and he always finds a way to buy some time in the pocket and make a throw right before getting sacked. Itís truly spectacular.
    Ultimately, I like Sorensen. I think his combination of throw power, accuracy, and good decision making will take him very far in the NFL
    NFL Comparison: John Skelton, except he is a much better decision maker and he gets high marks on everything mentioned in paragraph 6 (composure, calmness, etc.).
    http://nflmocks.com/2012/07/17/brad-...outing-report/
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 10:39 AM.
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    31. Terrance Williams WR Baylor 6'3" 205
    It is clear that Williams has an excellent physical skill set: tall, fast, athletic. Baylor could have gotten more out of him if the team had given him more opportunities, but with a prolific connection of Griffin to Wright, the Bears didn't need to force more passes to Williams. If Wright wasn't at Baylor, it could have been Williams who was a first-round pick last April.

    The trait that really makes the senior unique is his speed. Williams' straight-line speed is superb. He had a lot of success running just straight go routes down the field last year. Williams is able to sprint down the field, which catches defensive backs by surprise considering how tall he is. Williams' lanky frame makes him look more like a possession receiver, but if defenses aren't ready, he can burn them for long touchdown receptions.

    Williams also operates comfortably in the short and intermediate part of the field. Baylor has had success with him running slants and digs; the staple routes of an NFL West Coast offense. He can catch the ball well in traffic and uses his big frame to shield defensive backs from the ball.

    On the more shallow and intermediate routes, Williams doesn't display the burner speed that he has when running a straight go route. However, the tall wide out has enough quickness in and out of his breaks to get separation from defensive backs and get open.

    Williams projects to being a fabulous red-zone weapon. His height and leaping ability make him a mismatch against most defensive backs, so NFL teams will like his potential on fade routes. He also does well to sit down in soft spots in zone. Griffin used that to Baylor's advantage in the red-zone last season.

    The thing that Williams could use some more work on is his hands. He can drop some catchable balls. While his hands aren't bad, they aren't above average. More development with NFL wide receivers coaches and time on the jugs machine could rectify that flaw.
    The skill that will help Williams win over NFL teams this spring is his ability to make plays in the red zone. He's a big-bodied (6'1", 205 pounds) receiver with the ability to elevate and high point the ball, and he excels at using his frame to shield the ball from defensive backs. Williams' upper-body strength and hand usage is also a big asset for him inside the 20-yard line, as it's very difficult to muscle him off his initial route.
    http://www.thephinsider.com/2013/1/2...w-jarvis-jones

    http://walterfootball.com/scoutingre...3twilliams.php
    Last edited by DKphin; 01-22-2013 at 12:13 PM.
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    32. Zach Ertz TE Stanford 6'6" 252
    The first pass catcher off the board next year could be Stanford tight end Zach Ertz. Heís not a freak of nature like Jimmy Graham, Rob Gronkowski or Vernon Davis. But at 6-6 and around 250lbs, heís a big target and will make plays. Ertz is a terrific run blocker and made several key plays in Stanfordís big 17-14 win over Oregon. He consistently puts his body on the line to break big gains and teams can use him for any play call. He and fellow tight end Levine Toilolo regularly lined up as Stanfordís only receivers against the Ducks, including in the games biggest play for a Cardinal touchdown with 90 seconds to go. Quarterback Kevin Hogan threw a fade to the left and Ertz made an acrobatic catch in tight coverage.
    Losing Andrew Luck to the NFL was an inevitable blow for Stanford, but one of the main reasons theyíve stayed competitive is due to guys like Ertz. Heís been a reliable pass catcher all year, recording 11 catches for 106 yards against the Ducks to take him to 747 yards for the year with six scores. If youíre the Miami Dolphins and looking to build around Ryan Tannehill, you have to consider this guy. There isnít a canít-miss receiver option early in round one, while some of the better offensive lineman might be off the board by the the time the Dolphins pick. With his ability to line up outside and as a key blocker, Ertz could be a top-15 choice next April.

    http://seahawksdraftblog.com/week-12...-a-top-15-pick
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 10:43 AM.
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    33. Jake Matthews OT TAMU 6'5" 305
    University of Texas A&M offensive tackle Jake Matthews, along with high-profile teammate OT Luke Joeckel, has been a key cog in the Aggies' surprising 2012 resurrection. Although he is not as talented on paper as the aforementioned Joeckel, Matthews could join him in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft. Matthews lacks the prototypical bulk that most NFL offensive tackles require, but that can come from time invested in the weight room. Since he likely will begin his career on the right side, his below average foot quickness can be masked to some degree by his solid hand-placement. Pass protection is not his strong suit and will need some grooming in his technique. Learning to sink through his hips and knees and thrust into his opponent's chest more consistently will be important to his development.
    The 6'5" junior plays best as a physically imposing run blocker. He brings a lot of effort and can be very scrappy. Keeps his pad level low and looks to maul defenders out of the play through the whistle. If anything, he can be over-aggressive by allowing his upper body to be overextended, which can allow defenders to catch him off-balance. He is an intelligent player though and displays good awareness when defenders stunt or come off the edge on a blitz.
    Matthews could sneak into the first round, but his current value places him as a second round pick in the 2013 NFL Draft.
    http://www.fftoolbox.com/nfl_draft/p...ospect_id=3414
    Last edited by DKphin; 12-31-2012 at 10:44 AM.
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