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Thread: 5 Reasons Legalized Marijuana Might Be Bad for Pot Smokers

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    5 Reasons Legalized Marijuana Might Be Bad for Pot Smokers

    It's a good time to be a marijuana smoker. Colorado and Washington have already enacted laws making weed legal for recreational use, and another 20 or so states allow it for medicinal use. With such a huge swath of the nation no longer harshing the mellow of their resident smokers, it appears the domino effect that marijuana proponents hope will lead to legalization at the federal level is finally gaining momentum.

    Translation: It's just a matter of time before you're able to walk into your local 7-Eleven and buy a fat sack of Marlboro Marijuana 100s

    If you're a smoker, it's the dream you've always dreamed of, but is it really going to be the stoner utopia some people are expecting? Probably not. Here are five reasons weed smokers shouldn't be looking forward to federally legalized marijuana.
    http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-reason...d-pot-smokers/

    A Cracked article, true, but a "serious" one. And sensible. These are all legitimate concerns, imo. I'm not sure I agree with the overall thesis, but I can't argue that commoditization doesn't have it's downsides. Look how it's taken since the end of prohibition to get where we are now with actual, quality American spirits and craft beers. Apparently the credit for the revolution of craft beer goes to Jimmy Carter, who deregulated it. But still, that's more than 30 years ago.
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    I can’t blame the people who already have their weed card & feel the current system works well enough as is, but I can’t find a good reason why this drug in particular should be treated any differently than alcohol, tobacco, or even caffeine for that matter, when it’s more benign than all three of them. I wouldn't mind if every state stopped at the Medical level (if every state’s program was as expansive as California’s, which most are nowhere near), but again I think most people view the whole getting “prescribed weed” as a charade anyway, & there’s also a lot of Doctors who don’t feel comfortable prescribing it and wish they’d legalize it already so they wouldn't have to deal with those type of visits. Let’s just admit what’s going on here and cut the middle-man out. If you want to buy cannabis and are of legal-age, you should be able to buy cannabis just like you can buy beer, cigarettes, or coffee.

    The legalization of Medical-marijuana also doesn't end cannabis related arrests. In 2012 in California --the most cannabis friendly state in the country-- there were over thirteen-thousand felony arrests for marijuana related offenses. That’s thirteen-thousand too many in my opinion. I imagine those per-capita rates are even higher in other medical-marijuana states.

    As far as Big-Business edging out smaller dispensaries that might be true to some degree, but we are after all a capitalistic society. It’s very possible that with legalization you could have your “Starbucks of pot” type of mega-franchises, but smaller dispensaries and smaller growers are always going to have a place just like craft-beer will always have a place. You could argue that complete legalization opens the door for even more smaller scale Mom-&-Pop growers. Maybe the guy who was too apprehensive about growing pot in his house decides to use that spare-room to grow 20 plants in.

    There’s also the issue of the increased amount of tax-revenue it would bring in to the state. I think most states are realizing that now and are moving in that direction. Not to mention the increase in jobs that would accompany a full-scale legalization.

    No offense to the author, but the rest of it reads kind of like a hipster who’s upset her favorite band got “too mainstream”.
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    I agree with you rob. Thats putting a lot of pressure on the prescribing physician, who could get in trouble for handing out prescriptions when there shouldnt have been any given. These doctors will be getting visitors every day, and sure they will be making money off the visit, but if one of those patients get in some sort of legal trouble for having improper medical clearance it will be traced back to the prescribing physician.

    I think the main issue is the age. It should not be 18 like tabacco, it should at least be 21. I smoke weed quite often, but I didnt start until last year, when I was about 23. Our neural network isnt fully formed until we are 23-26 and I'm afraid of the effects it would have on a younger kids smoking. I consider myself a successful person and weed hasnt changed my motivation or mental function but for those people I know that started smoking when they were in high school, they seem a bit slower and demotivated to achieve greatness. Of course, alcohol also interferes with neuroplasticity which is why I agree with the 21+ drinking age, among the many other reasons.

    Besides the physiology of it all, the psychological aspects must be considered. Many people, including myself, are impressionable and had a more addictive personality at that age because we aren't fully in tune with the consequences of complacency. Weed is amazing and it has many great uses but, in my opinion, that classic deadbeat/lazy/unmotivated pothead stereotype arises from those individuals who started smoking too early. I'm not saying smoking weed is going to make you retarded if you smoke at an early age, but it's ability to become habit-forming and detrimental is much greater.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob19 View Post
    I can’t blame the people who already have their weed card & feel the current system works well enough as is, but I can’t find a good reason why this drug in particular should be treated any differently than alcohol, tobacco, or even caffeine for that matter, when it’s more benign than all three of them. I wouldn't mind if every state stopped at the Medical level (if every state’s program was as expansive as California’s, which most are nowhere near), but again I think most people view the whole getting “prescribed weed” as a charade anyway, & there’s also a lot of Doctors who don’t feel comfortable prescribing it and wish they’d legalize it already so they wouldn't have to deal with those type of visits. Let’s just admit what’s going on here and cut the middle-man out. If you want to buy cannabis and are of legal-age, you should be able to buy cannabis just like you can buy beer, cigarettes, or coffee.

    The legalization of Medical-marijuana also doesn't end cannabis related arrests. In 2012 in California --the most cannabis friendly state in the country-- there were over thirteen-thousand felony arrests for marijuana related offenses. That’s thirteen-thousand too many in my opinion. I imagine those per-capita rates are even higher in other medical-marijuana states.

    As far as Big-Business edging out smaller dispensaries that might be true to some degree, but we are after all a capitalistic society. It’s very possible that with legalization you could have your “Starbucks of pot” type of mega-franchises, but smaller dispensaries and smaller growers are always going to have a place just like craft-beer will always have a place. You could argue that complete legalization opens the door for even more smaller scale Mom-&-Pop growers. Maybe the guy who was too apprehensive about growing pot in his house decides to use that spare-room to grow 20 plants in.

    There’s also the issue of the increased amount of tax-revenue it would bring in to the state. I think most states are realizing that now and are moving in that direction. Not to mention the increase in jobs that would accompany a full-scale legalization.

    No offense to the author, but the rest of it reads kind of like a hipster who’s upset her favorite band got “too mainstream”.
    If these substances are all being lumped in the same category then the category is too broad to be useful. Marijuana only has a positive effect on your long term health (and is a short term mood elevator) but it should be regulated because of it's short term ability to impair. Caffeine and especially tobacco can have negative health effects (caffeine only at extremely high levels, at least according to what I've read about), but one does not get into car accidents because coffee or cigars. It's a completely different discussion altogether.

    As for the "small time growers will always have their place" bit, history says it will be more dicey than that. Craft beer did not always have it's place, as I said in my original post. After the end of prohibition the making and sale of alcohol was tightly controlled, controls which benefited the mega beer makers. It took until 1979 for the regulations to be undone and another 30 years for craft beer to really hit it's stride. The natural force of capitalism will absolutely take a hand here. I'm not saying it's going to be worse than it is now only that it's a consequence that people don't seem to be considering.

    The most interesting aspect of the article was about whether it's better for marijuana to be considered medicine. I suppose it would be a more interesting discussion if we were a country with a universal health care system and prescriptions of marijuana could be potentially covered by your insurance. But in our price bloated free market ****storm it's probably better left out.
    Last edited by TheWalrus; 09-21-2013 at 12:43 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWalrus View Post
    If these substances are all being lumped in the same category then the category is too broad to be useful. Marijuana only has a positive effect on your long term health (and is a short term mood elevator) but it should be regulated because of it's short term ability to impair. Caffeine and especially tobacco can have negative health effects (caffeine only at extremely high levels, at least according to what I've read about), but one does not get into car accidents because coffee or cigars. It's a completely different discussion altogether.
    Absolutely it should be regulated. My biggest problem with the war on drugs in general is that the government should regulate them. Alcohol is a legal commodity and it impairs. I can't think of any reason why you would treat cannabis any different and require one to have a medical need for it.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheWalrus
    As for the "small time growers will always have their place" bit, history says it will be more dicey than that. Craft beer did not always have it's place, as I said in my original post. After the end of prohibition the making and sale of alcohol was tightly controlled, controls which benefited the mega beer makers. It took until 1979 for the regulations to be undone and another 30 years for craft beer to really hit it's stride. The natural force of capitalism will absolutely take a hand here. I'm not saying it's going to be worse than it is now only that it's a consequence that people don't seem to be considering.
    Cannabis does have an advantage in that regard in that I can grow good quality marijuana if I have the right seeds, but I'm not sure that you can make a batch of Fat Tire. Or if you could, at least not as easily as I could grow it. Again I understand the concern, but it is after all the nature of capitalism.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheWalrus
    The most interesting aspect of the article was about whether it's better for marijuana to be considered medicine. I suppose it would be a more interesting discussion if we were a country with a universal health care system and prescriptions of marijuana could be potentially covered by your insurance. But in our price bloated free market ****storm it's probably left out.
    It can have undeniable medicinal value (as does cocaine for example in certain applications), so outside of the highly-unlikely but awesome possibility of insurance coverage, whether one would want to consider it a medicine or a drug would be somewhat of a semantical issue. To quote Neil Tyson, "The human body is an assembly of chemicals, as is all food & all medicine. So what we label as a drug is a social construct".
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob19 View Post
    Absolutely it should be regulated. My biggest problem with the war on drugs in general is that the government should regulate them. Alcohol is a legal commodity and it impairs. I can't think of any reason why you would treat cannabis any different and require one to have a medical need for it.



    Cannabis does have an advantage in that regard in that I can grow good quality marijuana if I have the right seeds, but I'm not sure that you can make a batch of Fat Tire. Or if you could, at least not as easily as I could grow it. Again I understand the concern, but it is after all the nature of capitalism.



    It can have undeniable medicinal value (as does cocaine for example in certain applications), so outside of the highly-unlikely but awesome possibility of insurance coverage, whether one would want to consider it a medicine or a drug would be somewhat of a semantical issue. To quote Neil Tyson, "The human body is an assembly of chemicals, as is all food & all medicine. So what we label as a drug is a social construct".
    Well, that's kind of the thing. Home brewing didn't become legal until 1978, and states are still permitted to regulate the issue as they please. Utah didn't make home brewing legal until just a few years ago, for example. Part of the "deal" on making marijuana legal could be the continued prohibition of growing it for your own use, a provision I'm sure the nation's farmers would heartily support.

    As a public relations issue if you're trying to sell it to Skeptical Soccer Mom it might work better to go at it from the medical benefits angle than the "it's fun and hurts no one" angle. But I suppose there's very little logic in what's legal and what isn't. Skeptical Soccer Mom doesn't hate marijuana, per se. She hates the people who smoke it, especially since in her mind so many of them are, you know, black.

    Issues of patents get in the way of a lot broader drug policy, too. There are plenty of drugs that should be deregulated and sold at grocery stores only the FDA is massively underfunded -- leading to backlogs on testing, etc -- and drug companies work like mad to extend patents even after they've recouped their initial investment. I get that some of these drugs have harmful side effects if used the wrong way but, you know, so does Aspirin. Taking too much aspirin can cause your stomach to bleed (leading to a little thing called ****ting blood) and cause micro perforations in the small intestine (leading to **** in your blood).
    Last edited by TheWalrus; 09-21-2013 at 02:43 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWalrus View Post
    Well, that's kind of the thing. Home brewing didn't become legal until 1978, and states are still permitted to regulate the issue as they please. Utah didn't make home brewing legal until just a few years ago, for example. Part of the "deal" on making marijuana legal could be the continued prohibition of growing it for your own use, a provision I'm sure the nation's farmers would heartily support.

    As a public relations issue if you're trying to sell it to Skeptical Soccer Mom it might work better to go at it from the medical benefits angle than the "it's fun and hurts no one" angle. But I suppose there's very little logic in what's legal and what isn't. Skeptical Soccer Mom doesn't hate marijuana, per se. She hates the people who smoke it, especially since in her mind so many of them are, you know, black.
    I suppose it could possibly help with the initial stages of legalization from a public-relations standpoint, but truthfully I don't see it as a realistically enforceable law. Most states with medical programs allow you to grow a certain number of plants, but I would venture to guess the number of people who outgrow their allotment is fairly substantial.

    California State Senate Bill 420 authorizes card-holding medical marijuana users to possess up to six (6) mature plants, twelve (12) immature plants, and eight ounces (8 oz.) of dried cannabis. (Some counties allow more. For instance, San Diego medical marijuana users may keep up to one pound (1 lb.) of cannabis and twenty-four (24) indoor plants.)
    It's just something you recognize & accept that comes with the territory for either medical, or full legalization. Even with it currently being federally illegal, the underground marijuana market is alive and well in every state in the country. There's already a countless amount of people growing it in their homes and selling it on the black-market. I don't think it's something you're going to stop no matter what you do, nor do I believe it should be stopped.

    It's also not like allowing people to grow their own will completely render the growers unnecessary. California still has a booming marijuana industry despite allowing people to grow their own. A vast majority of the people do not grow it themselves.
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    5 Reasons Legalized Marijuana Might Be Bad for Pot Smokers

    I have cousin in Michigan who has his medical card. He is allowed to grow 12 plants at different stages of development.

    This is the much cheaper option. Once the government gets involved you can bet it will cost more than the black market.

    He occasionally goes to the state dispensary but the price is twice the price of black market and much more than growing your own.

    I'd be happy with medical weed passing in Ohio.
    I have a greenhouse on my property and could convert it to be able to grow my own and save myself some decent money.

    By growing it would also help save my lungs. I have been experimenting with using weed to cook. You get the same effect but lasts a lot longer. The only problem is you need larger quantities and even with black market prices it can get rather expensive. Growing it would eliminate it

    If it is legalized and controlled by the fed I think it could totally screw it up. Once the big corps get involved they will want to take away your ability to grow so that you have to buy from them. JMO.
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    LOl. There is an age ol' adage, be careful what you wish for.

    Legalization is a good thing from the standpoint of the government, not necessarily the people who use marijuana. It saves the government money on several fronts, you reduce the enforcement side of the law and increase the revenue side but it comes at a cost, if you allow it, big business will exploit it. That means blending, additives, fillers etc...to increase the profitability.

    You'd like to think that they learned a lesson from Tobacco but truth be told, it will be governed, marketed, regulated and taxed the exact same way.
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