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Thread: Blackfish

  1. -1
    Daytona Fin's Avatar
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    Cam Wake 91Tannehill 171972 Dolphins Logo2013 Dolphins Logo

    Blackfish

    Just watched the documentary Blackfish on netflix. It's centers around the relationship between sea world , the orca whale and the trainers. It was an eye opening experience for me. I will never visit sea world or any other aquatic life park ever again. It's very saddening to learn how the whales have been treated so inhumane for so many years. I never realized how uneducated I was on this subject. I know most documentaries of this type can be biased but it's hard for sea world to hide from the facts in this one. Hopefully one day before I die , I will get to see Tilikum released back into the wild.

    http://blackfishmovie.com/
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    GoonBoss's Avatar
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    How do you think that whale will do when released "back into the wild"?

    The locals down that way have repeatedly resisted an expansion of Seaworld to enable better surroundings,
    for the first pat. For the second part, at this point releasing that whale into the wild would be horribly
    inhumane.

    Thanks Shifty!

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    rob19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoonBoss View Post
    How do you think that whale will do when released "back into the wild"?
    Just fine. They're goddamn Orca. They have virtually no natural predators, and instinct will kick in when it comes to catching fish and migratory patterns.

    The only killer whale known to be put back into the wild after human intervention was spotted with her first baby last week.

    In 2002, a young killer whale named Springer was reintroduced to her pod in northern Vancouver Island (map), Canada, after she was found orphaned in Puget Sound (map), about 300 miles (480 kilometers) south of her home.

    No one knew if the move would hurt the whale or her chances for reintegrating back into the pod and one day becoming a healthy mother. (See National Geographic's whale pictures.)

    Finding Springer with her baby is "the ultimate sign that this whole reintroduction was a success.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...imals-science/
    I haven't seen the documentary, nor am I necessarily advocating a sudden wide-spread release of all 'intelligent' aquatic life, but it's something I'd like to see eventually phased out. Not only sea world, but I don't think we should be keeping Lions, Tigers, Elephants, Orangutans, Chimpanzees, and so forth, locked up in cages.

    I enjoyed the Zoo as a child, but as an adult it's just depressing for me.
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  4. -4
    Daytona Fin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoonBoss View Post
    How do you think that whale will do when released "back into the wild"?

    The locals down that way have repeatedly resisted an expansion of Seaworld to enable better surroundings,
    for the first pat. For the second part, at this point releasing that whale into the wild would be horribly
    inhumane.
    Can't be any worse than his current conditions. They had to isolate him because of constant damaging attacks from the other females. Now he spends his days floating lifeless in his area, like a slow, dying fish in an aquarium.
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    GoonBoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daytona Fin View Post
    Can't be any worse than his current conditions. They had to isolate him because of constant damaging attacks from the other females. Now he spends his days floating lifeless in his area, like a slow, dying fish in an aquarium.
    Well, I guess if being killed and eaten is better, I'd agree with you. Perhaps it is.

    ---------- Post added at 11:43 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:41 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by rob19 View Post
    Just fine. They're goddamn Orca. They have virtually no natural predators, and instinct will kick in when it comes to catching fish and migratory patterns.



    I haven't seen the documentary, nor am I necessarily advocating a sudden wide-spread release of all 'intelligent' aquatic life, but it's something I'd like to see eventually phased out. Not only sea world, but I don't think we should be keeping Lions, Tigers, Elephants, Orangutans, Chimpanzees, and so forth, locked up in cages.

    I enjoyed the Zoo as a child, but as an adult it's just depressing for me.
    Well, Ron McGill on the LeBetard show has said repeatedly that he opposes critters like this in captivity, but also
    points out that upon release, it's a death sentance for an animal that has no sense of survival in the wild. I trust his opinion
    over "It's a goddamn Orca"
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    rob19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoonBoss View Post
    Well, I guess if being killed and eaten is better, I'd agree with you. Perhaps it is.

    Well, Ron McGill on the LeBetard show has said repeatedly that he opposes critters like this in captivity, but also
    points out that upon release, it's a death sentance for an animal that has no sense of survival in the wild. I trust his opinion
    over "It's a goddamn Orca"
    "Killer whales are regarded as apex predators, lacking natural predators". Of all the concerns to have about releasing these animals back into the wild, I imagine getting eaten would be least among them. I'm not a marine biologist, so I have no earthly idea how well something like this would fare on a mass scale. We only have one such case, and it seemed to be a success.

    Daytona does have a point that captivity is inherently unhealthy for these animals, but there's a story on CNN that offers an compromise.

    (CNN) -- The film "Blackfish" compellingly describes many of the reasons why keeping orcas in captivity is -- and always has been -- a bad idea.

    The main premise of the film is that these large, intelligent, social predators are dangerous to their trainers. But orcas are also directly harmed by being confined in concrete tanks and the science is growing to support this common sense conclusion.

    The latest data show that orcas are more than three times as likely to die at any age in captivity as they are in the wild. This translates into a shorter life span and is probably the result of several factors. First, orcas in captivity are out of shape; they are the equivalent of couch potatoes, as the largest orca tank in the world is less than one ten-thousandth of one percent (0.0001%) the size of the smallest home range of wild orcas.

    Second, they are in artificial and often incompatible social groups. This contributes to chronic stress, which can depress the immune system and leave captive orcas susceptible to infections they would normally fight off in the wild.

    Third, they often break their teeth chewing compulsively on metal gates. These broken teeth, even drilled and cleaned regularly by irrigation, are clear routes for bacteria to enter the bloodstream. These are the obvious factors; there are almost certainly others contributing to the elevated mortality seen in captivity.
    These factors boil down simply to this: Captivity kills orcas.

    Yes, they may survive for years entertaining audiences, but eventually the stressors of captivity catch up to them. Very few captive orcas make it to midlife (approximately 30 years for males and 45 for females) and not one out of more than 200 held in captivity has ever come close to old age (60 for males, 80 for females). Most captive orcas die while they are still very young by wild orca standards.

    There is a win/win solution to both the trainer safety and orca welfare dilemmas facing marine theme parks around the world, including SeaWorld in the United States.

    These facilities can work with experts around the world to create sanctuaries where captive orcas can be rehabilitated and retired. These sanctuaries would be sea pens or netted-off bays or coves, in temperate to cold water natural habitat. They would offer the animals respite from performing and the constant exposure to a parade of strangers (an entirely unnatural situation for a species whose social groupings are based on family ties and stability -- "strangers" essentially do not exist in orca society). Incompatible animals would not be forced to cohabit the same enclosures and family groups would be preserved.

    Show business trainers would no longer be necessary. Expert caretakers would continue to train retired whales for veterinary procedures, but would not get in the water and would remain at a safe distance (this is known in zoo parlance as "protected contact"). And the degree to which they interact directly with the whales would be each whale's choice.
    A fundamental premise of these sanctuaries, however, is that eventually they would empty. Breeding would not be allowed and captive orcas would no longer exist within the next few decades.
    http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/24/opinio...cas-solutions/
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    MAYHEM's Avatar
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    But if it wasn,t for SeaWorld no one would know what an Orca is.
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  8. -8
    Daytona Fin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoonBoss View Post
    Well, I guess if being killed and eaten is better, I'd agree with you. Perhaps it is.

    Well, Ron McGill on the LeBetard show has said repeatedly that he opposes critters like this in captivity, but also
    points out that upon release, it's a death sentance for an animal that has no sense of survival in the wild. I trust his opinion
    over "It's a goddamn Orca"
    Having that whale released is not the main issue I was trying to convey. In all likelihood, he will never be released because he is orlando sea world's cash cow. The orca program at all aquatic parks around the globe is the real problem. They said there hasn't been one instance of an orca attacking a human in the wild but yet there have been numerous deaths and maiming of humans by orcas in captivity. Sea world continues to inseminate females with tilikum's sperm and selling these and sending these baby whales across the globe. Tilikum has became a dangerous orca to man, so to keep breeding from a psychotic whale is a recipe for disaster. Not to mention that when they steal these babies from birth it isn't much different from kidnapping a baby from a human at birth, it's a horrendous sight to watch. I hope they are right when they said in the film, in 50 years we will look back on this and say how could they have been so barbaric.

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    Dolfan3773's Avatar
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    Yeah it's pretty sad and eye opening.

    Just a warning...you see a whale get jerked off and it eats a dudes penis.
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    I have seen the movie and I have a pass to sea world...

    let me explain something to you, you will never understand just how big and impressive that whale is until you see him up close. They had him start performing again in the middle of this year although I didnt see him until a few weeks ago. he is monstrously big. his fins are taller than me (they curl under now but you get the point).

    I am torn on the subject of keeping those whales in the tanks that they do...they are animals that travel hundreds of miles a day to look for food and they have them in what would equate to being a tiny percentage of that...

    at the same time I have never seen a killer whale in the wild and unless i go specifically looking for one i probably never will...I have seen dolphins in the wild and they amaze me, they play with the boats and keep up and know you are up there...I am amazed by them because I have seen them up close, it is much easier to want to protect an animal that you could reach out an touch on your own...if you only see a killer whale on TV its much less personal, and you do not get the whole scope and scale of them...the fact that they can do what they do in that tank is pretty cool...and this is what seaworld does that is important, out of the thousands of people that go to see the shamu show some will want to learn more, some will want to do something to protect them, and some will want to free them.

    Lets be honest, sea worlds number one job is to make money.

    but in the back of seaworld they have animals that are to injured to even be shown off...they have a pilot whale back there that has scoliosis (sher spine was like an S when they found her and how its at a 45ish degree angle) and will probably never be put back into the wild, but one day she might be healthy enough and able to swim enough to be put in the tank with the other pilot or beluga whales. as it is now she is in extremely shallow water. they have injured turtles that can never go back to the wild, but they can be put into educational shows. they treat tens of thousands of birds a year. they are more equipped to help sea life than any other place in the USA other than the other sea world.



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